A New History of Kentucky

A New History of Kentucky
Author: Lowell Hayes Harrison
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 533
Release: 1997-03-27
ISBN: 9780813120089
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A New History of Kentucky Book Excerpt:

"[B]rings the Commonwealth [of Kentucky] to life."-cover.

A New History of Kentucky

A New History of Kentucky
Author: James C. Klotter,Craig Thompson Friend
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 560
Release: 2018-11-26
ISBN: 0813176506
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A New History of Kentucky Book Excerpt:

When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state. With new discoveries and findings, the narrative continues to evolve, and so does the telling of Kentucky's rich history. In this second edition, authors James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend provide significantly revised content with updated material on gender politics, African American history, and cultural history. This wide-ranging volume includes a full overview of the state and its economic, educational, environmental, racial, and religious histories. At its essence, Kentucky's story is about its people -- not just the notable and prominent figures but also lesser-known and sometimes overlooked personalities. The human spirit unfolds through the lives of individuals such as Shawnee peace chief Nonhelema Hokolesqua and suffrage leader Madge Breckinridge, early land promoter John Filson, author Wendell Berry, and Iwo Jima flag--raiser Private Franklin Sousley. They lived on a landscape defined by its topography as much as its political boundaries, from Appalachia in the east to the Jackson Purchase in the west, and from the Walker Line that forms the Commonwealth's southern boundary to the Ohio River that shapes its northern boundary. Along the journey are traces of Kentucky's past -- its literary and musical traditions, its state-level and national political leadership, and its basketball and bourbon. Yet this volume also faces forthrightly the Commonwealth's blemishes -- the displacement of Native Americans, African American enslavement, the legacy of violence, and failures to address poverty and poor health. A New History of Kentucky ranges throughout all parts of the Commonwealth to explore its special meaning to those who have called it home. It is a broadly interpretive, all-encompassing narrative that tells Kentucky's complex, extensive, and ever-changing story.

A History of Education in Kentucky

A History of Education in Kentucky
Author: William E. Ellis
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 546
Release: 2011-06-17
ISBN: 0813140234
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A History of Education in Kentucky Book Excerpt:

Kentucky is nationally renowned for horses, bourbon, rich natural resources, and unfortunately, hindered by a deficient educational system. Though its reputation is not always justified, in national rankings for grades K-12 and higher education, Kentucky consistently ranks among the lowest states in education funding, literacy, and student achievement. In A History of Education in Kentucky, William E. Ellis illuminates the successes and failures of public and private education in the commonwealth since its settlement. Ellis demonstrates how political leaders in the nineteenth century created a culture that devalued public education and refused to adequately fund it. He also analyzes efforts by teachers and policy makers to enact vital reforms and establish adequate, equal education, and discusses ongoing battles related to religious instruction, integration, and the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). A History of Education in Kentucky is the only up-to-date, single-volume history of education in the commonwealth. Offering more than mere policy analysis, this comprehensive work tells the story of passionate students, teachers, and leaders who have worked for progress from the 1770s to the present day. Despite the prevailing pessimism about education in Kentucky, Ellis acknowledges signs of a vibrant educational atmosphere in the state. By advocating a better understanding of the past, Ellis looks to the future and challenges Kentuckians to avoid historic failures and build on their successes.

Hidden History of Kentucky Political Scandals

Hidden History of Kentucky Political Scandals
Author: Robert Schrage and John Schaaf
Publsiher: Arcadia Publishing
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2020-08-17
ISBN: 1467145823
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Hidden History of Kentucky Political Scandals Book Excerpt:

At various points in history, Kentucky's politics and government have been rocked by scandal, and each episode defined the era in which it happened. In 1826, Governor Desha pardoned his own son for murder. In a horrific crime, Governor Goebel was assassinated in 1900. James Wilkinson was branded a traitor against Kentucky and the nation. "Honest Dick Tate" ran away with massive amounts of money from the state treasury. In modern times, Operation BOPTROT resulted in perhaps the biggest scandal in the state. Authors Robert Schrage and John Schaaf offer a fascinating account of Kentucky's history and its many unique and scandalous characters.

New History of Lexington Kentucky A

New History of Lexington  Kentucky  A
Author: Foster Ockerman, Jr.
Publsiher: Arcadia Publishing
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2021-10-11
ISBN: 1467146854
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

New History of Lexington Kentucky A Book Excerpt:

Lexington is known as the "Horse Capital of the World," but the city's history runs much deeper. Learn about the mayor who refused the Ku Klux Klan permission to march and organize in the city. Meet one of the nation's foremost advocates for voting rights for women who was a native of the city. Visit the many small hamlets around Lexington that were settlements for the formerly enslaved. Lexington was the state's first capital and the nation's first community to establish an urban service boundary to regulate growth and preserve horse farms. Seventh-generation Kentuckian and Lexington native Foster Ockerman Jr. offers an updated history.

Kentucky Government Politics and Public Policy

Kentucky Government  Politics  and Public Policy
Author: James C. Clinger,Michael W. Hail
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 544
Release: 2013-10-08
ISBN: 0813143179
Category: Political Science
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Kentucky Government Politics and Public Policy Book Excerpt:

The cornerstone of the American republic is an educated, active, and engaged citizenry; however, the multifaceted inner workings of government and the political forces that shape it are incredibly complex. Kentucky Government, Politics, and Public Policy is the first book in nearly three decades to provide a comprehensive overview of the commonwealth's major governing and political institutions and the public policy issues that profoundly affect Kentuckians' daily lives. In this groundbreaking volume, editors James C. Clinger and Michael W. Hail have assembled respected scholars from across the state to inform citizens about their governing institutions, the consequences of their policy choices, and the intricacies of the political process. They provide clear and authoritative information on Kentucky's government and explain significant trends and patterns, exploring the legacy of the state's political history and illuminating the contributions of influential Kentucky politicians such as Henry Clay, Abraham Lincoln, and Jefferson Davis. The contributors also address essential topics such as the structure and function of the three branches of government, the constitution, and federalism and intergovernmental relations, as well as administration, budgeting, and finance. They analyze key issues in education policy, economic and community development, and health care in great detail, explaining persistently controversial topics such as campaign finance, the cost of elections, ethics, and the oversight of regulatory agencies. From the executive branch to the legislature, from the court system to political parties, there is no better primer on government in the commonwealth.

Hidden History of Kentucky in the Civil War

Hidden History of Kentucky in the Civil War
Author: Berry Craig
Publsiher: Arcadia Publishing
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2010-02-19
ISBN: 1614231036
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Hidden History of Kentucky in the Civil War Book Excerpt:

Kentucky's motto may be "united we stand, divided we fall," but during the civil war, brother fought brother to the bitter end. The Civil War sharply split the Bluegrass State. Kentuckians fought Kentuckians in some of the bloodiest battles of America's bloodiest war. The names and faces of the winning and losing generals of those battles are in most history books. But this book is not like most history books; it is about hidden history. Most of the stories are not found in other books. Some are proof that the Civil War was truly "a brother's war" in the home state of Lincoln and Davis. From the Graves County gun grab to pirates in Paducah to dueling gunboats on the Mississippi, this one-of-a-kind collection of little-known tales by Kentucky historian Berry Craig will captivate Civil War enthusiasts and casual readers alike.

Divided Loyalties

Divided Loyalties
Author: James W. Finck
Publsiher: Casemate Publishers
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2012-12-19
ISBN: 1611211034
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Divided Loyalties Book Excerpt:

On May 16, 1861, the Kentucky state legislature passed an ordinance declaring its neutrality, which the state’s governor, Beriah Magoffin, confirmed four days later. Kentucky’s declaration and ultimate support for the Union stood at odds with the state’s social and cultural heritage. After all, Kentucky was a slave state and enjoyed deep and meaningful connections to the new Confederacy. Much of what has been written to explain this curious choice concludes Kentucky harbored strong Unionist feelings. James Finck’s freshly written and deeply researched Divided Loyalties: Kentucky’s Struggle for Armed Neutrality in the Civil War shatters this conclusion. An in-depth study of the twelve months that decided Kentucky’s fate (November 1860 – November 1861), Divided Loyalties persuasively argues that the Commonwealth did not support neutrality out of its deep Unionist’s sentiment. In fact, it was Kentucky’s equally divided loyalties that brought about its decision to remain neutral. Both Unionists and Secessionists would come to support neutrality at different times when they felt their side would lose. Along the way, Dr. Finck examines the roles of the state legislature, the governor, other leading Kentuckians, and average citizens to understand how Kentuckians felt about the prospects of war and secession, and how bloodshed could be avoided. The finely styled prose is built upon a foundation of primary sources including letters, journals, newspapers, government documents, and published reports. By focusing exclusively on one state, one issue, and one year, Divided Loyalties provides a level of detail that will deeply interest both Kentuckians and Civil War enthusiasts alike. Kentucky’s final decision was the result of intrigue and betrayal within the Commonwealth while armies gathered around its borders waiting for any opportunity to invade. And it was within this heated environment that Kentuckians made the most important decision in their history.

Bluegrass Renaissance

Bluegrass Renaissance
Author: James C. Klotter,Daniel Rowland
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 378
Release: 2012-08-31
ISBN: 0813140439
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Bluegrass Renaissance Book Excerpt:

Originally established in 1775 the town of Lexington, Kentucky grew quickly into a national cultural center amongst the rolling green hills of the Bluegrass Region. Nicknamed the "Athens of the West," Lexington and the surrounding area became a leader in higher education, visual arts, architecture, and music, and the center of the horse breeding and racing industries. The national impact of the Bluegrass was further confirmed by prominent Kentucky figures such as Henry Clay and John C. Breckinridge. Bluegrass Renaissance: The History and Culture of Central Kentucky, 1792-1852, chronicles Lexington's development as one of the most important educational and cultural centers in America during the first half of the nineteenth century. Editors Daniel Rowland and James C. Klotter gather leading scholars to examine the successes and failures of Central Kentuckians from statehood to the death of Henry Clay, in an investigation of the area's cultural and economic development and national influence. Bluegrass Renaissance is an interdisciplinary study of the evolution of Lexington's status as antebellum Kentucky's cultural metropolis.

A History of Eastern Kentucky University

A History of Eastern Kentucky University
Author: William E. Ellis
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2014-10-17
ISBN: 0813159601
Category: Education
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A History of Eastern Kentucky University Book Excerpt:

Eastern Kentucky University (EKU) in Richmond, Kentucky, was originally established as a normal school in 1906 in the wake of a landmark education law passed by the Kentucky General Assembly. One hundred years later, the school has evolved into a celebrated multipurpose regional university that is national in scope. The school was built on a campus that had housed Central University, a southern Presbyterian institution. In its early years, EKU grew slowly, buffeted by cyclical economic problems and the interruptions of two world wars. During that time, however, strong leadership from early presidents Ruric Nevel Roark, John Grant Crabbe, and Herman L. Donovan laid the groundwork for later expansions. President Robert. R. Martin oversaw the rapid growth of the institution in the 1960s. He managed an increase in enrollment and he had additional facilities built to house and educate the growing student population. A savvy administrator, he was at the forefront of vocational education and initiated programs in nursing and allied heath and in law enforcement education. His successor, J.C. Powell, built on Martin's work and saw EKU mature as a regional university. He reorganized its colleges to better balance the needs of general and technical education students and kept educational programs going despite decreases in state funding. In addition, Powell's years were a magical time for EKU's sports programs, as the Colonels captured national football championships in 1979 and 1982 and finished second in 1980 and 1981. Today, EKU continues to offer students a quality education and strives to meet the diverse needs of its student body. Three Eastern campuses, as well as distance learning programs through the Kentucky Telelinking Network, offer more options to students than ever before as EKU prepares them for the challenges of a new century. In A History of Eastern Kentucky University, William E. Ellis recounts the university's colorful history, from political quandaries surrounding presidential administrations and financial difficulties during the Great Depression to its maturing as a leading regional university. Interviews with alumni, faculty, staff, and political figures provide a personal side to the history of the school. Reflecting on the social, economic, and cultural changes in the region during the last century, Ellis's examination of the growth and development of EKU is an essential resource for alumni and for those interested in the progression of public higher education in Kentucky and the region.

Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South

Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South
Author: Melba Porter Hay
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 363
Release: 2009-04-24
ISBN: 0813139147
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South Book Excerpt:

A biography of the Kentucky women’s rights activist and progressive reformer, featuring personal interviews and recently discovered correspondence. Preeminent Kentucky reformer and women’s rights advocate Madeline McDowell Breckinridge (1872-1920) was at the forefront of social change during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A descendant of Henry Clay and the daughter of two of Kentucky’s most prominent families, Breckinridge had a remarkably varied activist career that included roles in the promotion of public health, education, women’s rights, and charity. Founder of the Lexington Civic League and Associated Charities, Breckinridge successfully lobbied to create parks and playgrounds and to establish a juvenile court system in Kentucky. She also became president of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, served as vice president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and even campaigned across the country for the League of Nations. In the first biography of Breckinridge since 1921, Melba Porter Hay draws on newly discovered correspondence and rich personal interviews with her female associates to illuminate the fascinating life of this important Kentucky activist. Deftly balancing Breckinridge’s public reform efforts with her private concerns, Hay tells the story of Madeline’s marriage to Desha Breckinridge, editor of the Lexington Herald, and how she used the match to her advantage by promoting social causes in the newspaper. Hay also chronicles Breckinridge’s ordeals with tuberculosis and amputation, and emotionally trying episodes of family betrayal and sex scandals. Hay describes how Breckinridge’s physical struggles and personal losses transformed her from a privileged socialite into a selfless advocate for the disadvantaged. Later as vice president of the National American Women Suffrage Association, Breckinridge lobbied for Kentucky’s ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, which gave women the right to vote in 1920. While devoting much of her life to the woman suffrage movement on the local and national levels, she also supported the antituberculosis movement, social programs for the poor, compulsory school attendance, and laws regulating child labor. In bringing to life this extraordinary reformer, Hay shows how Breckinridge championed Kentucky’s social development during the Progressive Era. Praise for Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South “An important contribution to American history, one that is of special significance to Kentucky history, the Progressive Era, and the women's rights movement.” —Paul Fuller, author of Laura Clay and the Women’s Rights Movement “Hay brings to life a multi-dimensional woman, emblematic of her times, with whom readers can identify and sympathize.” —Melanie Beals Goan, author of Mary Breckinridge: The Frontier Nursing Service and Rural Health in Appalachia

A Concise History of Kentucky

A Concise History of Kentucky
Author: James C. Klotter,Freda C. Klotter
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 238
Release: 2008-03-21
ISBN: 9780813191928
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A Concise History of Kentucky Book Excerpt:

To most people, the word "Kentucky" is likely to inspire thoughts of Derby Day, burley tobacco fields, feuding Appalachian families, coal mines, and Colonel Sanders' famous fried chicken. There is much more, however, to the Bluegrass State's rich but often unexplored history than mint juleps and the Hatfields and McCoys. In A Concise History of Kentucky, authors James C. Klotter and Freda C. Klotter introduce readers to a captivating story that spans 12,000 years of Kentucky lives, from Native Americans to astronauts. All facets of Kentucky history are explored -- geography, government, social structure, culture, education, and the economy -- recounting unique historic events such as the deadly frontier wars, the assassination of a governor, and the birth of Bluegrass music. The book features profiles of famous Kentuckians such as Daniel Boone, Abraham Lincoln, Loretta Lynn, and Muhammad Ali, as well as ordinary citizens. A joint collaboration of the state historian of Kentucky and an experienced educator, A Concise History of Kentucky is an authoritative, readable story that will educate and entertain newcomers to Kentucky history and those who simply want to learn more about the Commonwealth.

Unconditional Unionist

Unconditional Unionist
Author: Berry Craig,Dieter C. Ullrich
Publsiher: McFarland
Total Pages: 224
Release: 2016-09-26
ISBN: 1476663696
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Unconditional Unionist Book Excerpt:

When U.S. Congressman Lucian Anderson from Kentucky voted for the 13th Amendment to the Constitution in January 1865, abolishing slavery, he gambled more than his political career. Anderson was from Mayfield, one of the most rabidly secessionist towns in the Bluegrass State. During the Civil War, his political alignment changed from pro-slavery Union Democrat to Unconditional Unionist to Republican. Elected by Unionists in 1863, he soon received death threats and was kidnapped by Confederate raiders who held him for ransom (while he tried to convert them to the Union cause). He was a Kentucky delegate to the 1864 national convention that re-nominated President Abraham Lincoln. Knowing he could not win another term, Anderson did not seek reelection in 1865. Based on newspaper articles, letters and other contemporary sources, this book provides a detailed portrait of an overlooked but significant figure of the Civil War and Kentucky history.

The Fall of Kentucky s Rock

The Fall of Kentucky s Rock
Author: George G. Humphreys
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 390
Release: 2022-01-18
ISBN: 0813182352
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Fall of Kentucky s Rock Book Excerpt:

This in-depth study offers a new examination of a region that is often overlooked in political histories of the Bluegrass State. George G. Humphreys traces the arc of politics and the economy in western Kentucky from avid support of the Democratic Party to its present-day Republican identity. He demonstrates that, despite its relative geographic isolation, the region west of the eastern boundary of Hancock, Ohio, Butler, Warren, and Simpson Counties to the Mississippi River played significant roles in state and national politics during the New Deal and postwar eras. Drawing on extensive archival research and oral history interviews, Humphreys explores the area's political transformation from a solid Democratic voting bloc to a conservative stronghold by examining how developments such as advances in agriculture, the diversification of the economy, and the civil rights movement affected the region. Addressing notable deficiencies in the existing literature, this impressively researched study will leave readers with a deeper understanding of post-1945 Kentucky politics.

Thomas D Clark of Kentucky

Thomas D  Clark of Kentucky
Author: John E. Kleber
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2021-12-14
ISBN: 0813189586
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Thomas D Clark of Kentucky Book Excerpt:

Special numbered leatherbound edition, signed by Dr. Clark! By the flip of a coin, Thomas Dionysius Clark became intertwined in the vast history of Kentucky. In 1928, Clark received scholarships to both the University of Cincinnati and to the University of Kentucky. Kentucky won the coin toss and the claim to one of the South's eminent historians. In 1990, when the Kentucky General Assembly honored Clark by declaring him Kentucky's Historian Laureate for life, Governor Brereton Jones described Clark as "Kentucky's greatest treasure." Historian, advocate, educator, preservationist, publisher, writer, mentor, friend, Kentuckian—Dr. Clark has filled all these roles and more. Thomas D. Clark of Kentucky is a celebration of his life and careerby just a few of those who have felt his influence and shared his enthusiasm for his adopted home state of Kentucky.

Kentucky s Rebel Press

Kentucky   s Rebel Press
Author: Berry Craig
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 244
Release: 2018-01-05
ISBN: 0813174600
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Kentucky s Rebel Press Book Excerpt:

Throughout the Civil War, the influence of the popular press and its skillful use of propaganda was extremely significant in Kentucky. Union and Confederate sympathizers were scattered throughout the border slave state, and in 1860, at least twenty-eight of the commonwealth's approximately sixty newspapers were pro-Confederate, making the secessionist cause seem stronger in Kentucky than it was in reality. In addition, the impact of these "rebel presses" reached beyond the region to readers throughout the nation. In this compelling and timely study, Berry Craig analyzes the media's role in both reflecting and shaping public opinion during a critical time in US history. Craig begins by investigating the 1860 secession crisis, which occurred at a time when most Kentuckians considered themselves ardent Unionists in support of the state's political hero, Henry Clay. But as secessionist arguments were amplified throughout the country, so were the voices of pro-Confederate journalists in the state. By January 1861, the Hickman Courier, Columbus Crescent, and Henderson Reporter steadfastly called for Kentucky to secede from the Union. Kentucky's Rebel Press also showcases journalists who supported the Confederate cause, including editor Walter N. Haldeman, who fled the state after Kentucky's most recognized Confederate paper, the Louisville Daily Courier, was shut down by Union forces. Exploring an intriguing and overlooked part of Civil War history, this book reveals the importance of the partisan press to the Southern cause in Kentucky.

Creating a Confederate Kentucky

Creating a Confederate Kentucky
Author: Anne E. Marshall
Publsiher: Univ of North Carolina Press
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2010-12-01
ISBN: 9780807899366
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Creating a Confederate Kentucky Book Excerpt:

In Creating a Confederate Kentucky, Anne E. Marshall traces the development of a Confederate identity in Kentucky between 1865 and 1925, belying the fact that Kentucky never left the Union. After the Civil War, the people of Kentucky appeared to forget their Union loyalties and embraced the Democratic politics, racial violence, and Jim Crow laws associated with former Confederate states. Marshall looks beyond postwar political and economic factors to the longer-term commemorations of the Civil War by which Kentuckians fixed the state's remembrance of the conflict for the following sixty years.

The Kentucky State Constitution

The Kentucky State Constitution
Author: Robert M. Ireland
Publsiher: Oxford University Press, USA
Total Pages: 280
Release: 2011
ISBN: 0199778825
Category: Law
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Kentucky State Constitution Book Excerpt:

The Kentucky State Constitution provides an outstanding constitutional and historical account of the state's governing charter. In addition to an overview of Kentucky's constitutional history, it provides an in-depth, section-by-section analysis of the entire constitution, detailing the many significant changes that have been made since its initial drafting. This treatment, along with a table of cases, index, and bibliography provides an unsurpassed reference guide for students, scholars, and practitioners of Kentucky's constitution. Previously published by Greenwood, this title has been brought back in to circulation by Oxford University Press with new verve. Re-printed with standardization of content organization in order to facilitate research across the series, this title, as with all titles in the series, is set to join the dynamic revision cycle of The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States. The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States is an important series that reflects a renewed international interest in constitutional history and provides expert insight into each of the 50 state constitutions. Each volume in this innovative series contains a historical overview of the state's constitutional development, a section-by-section analysis of its current constitution, and a comprehensive guide to further research. Under the expert editorship of Professor G. Alan Tarr, Director of the Center on State Constitutional Studies at Rutgers University, this series provides essential reference tools for understanding state constitutional law. Books in the series can be purchased individually or as part of a complete set, giving readers unmatched access to these important political documents.

Kentucky s Last Cavalier

Kentucky s Last Cavalier
Author: Peter J. Sehlinger
Publsiher: University Press of Kentucky
Total Pages: 309
Release: 2004-05-07
ISBN: 9780916968335
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Kentucky s Last Cavalier Book Excerpt:

"As this biography shows, Preston was Kentucky's last cavalier, the beau ideal of the Old South, a dashing defender of the old aristocracy both in the political realm and on the battlefield. His is a multidimensional story of power and privilege, family connections and gender roles, public service and proslavery politics. As Kentucky state historian James C. Klotter declares in the foreword, Preston's life "reveals much about his entire generation and his world.""--BOOK JACKET.

The Rivers Ran Backward

The Rivers Ran Backward
Author: Christopher Phillips
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 135
Release: 2016-04-22
ISBN: 0199720177
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Rivers Ran Backward Book Excerpt:

Most Americans imagine the Civil War in terms of clear and defined boundaries of freedom and slavery: a straightforward division between the slave states of Kentucky and Missouri and the free states of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Kansas. However, residents of these western border states, Abraham Lincoln's home region, had far more ambiguous identities-and contested political loyalties-than we commonly assume. In The Rivers Ran Backward, Christopher Phillips sheds light on the fluid political cultures of the "Middle Border" states during the Civil War era. Far from forming a fixed and static boundary between the North and South, the border states experienced fierce internal conflicts over their political and social loyalties. White supremacy and widespread support for the existence of slavery pervaded the "free" states of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, which had much closer economic and cultural ties to the South, while those in Kentucky and Missouri held little identification with the South except over slavery. Debates raged at every level, from the individual to the state, in parlors, churches, schools, and public meeting places, among families, neighbors, and friends. Ultimately, the pervasive violence of the Civil War and the cultural politics that raged in its aftermath proved to be the strongest determining factor in shaping these states' regional identities, leaving an indelible imprint on the way in which Americans think of themselves and others in the nation. The Rivers Ran Backward reveals the complex history of the western border states as they struggled with questions of nationalism, racial politics, secession, neutrality, loyalty, and even place-as the Civil War tore the nation, and themselves, apart. In this major work, Phillips shows that the Civil War was more than a conflict pitting the North against the South, but one within the West that permanently reshaped American regions.