Encyclopedia Of American Indian Literature

Author by : Jennifer McClinton-Temple
Languange : en
Publisher by : Infobase Learning
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 72
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Description : Presents an encyclopedia of American Indian literature in an alphabetical format listing authors and their works.


American Indian Literature

Author by : Alan R. Velie
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
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Total Read : 54
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Description : A collection of Native American literature features myths, tales, songs, memoirs, oratory, poetry, and fiction from the present as well as the past


American Indian Literature Environmental Justice And Ecocriticism

Author by : Joni Adamson
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Arizona Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 94
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Description : Although much contemporary American Indian literature examines the relationship between humans and the land, most Native authors do not set their work in the "pristine wilderness" celebrated by mainstream nature writers. Instead, they focus on settings such as reservations, open-pit mines, and contested borderlands. Drawing on her own teaching experience among Native Americans and on lessons learned from such recent scenes of confrontation as Chiapas and Black Mesa, Joni Adamson explores why what counts as "nature" is often very different for multicultural writers and activist groups than it is for mainstream environmentalists. This powerful book is one of the first to examine the intersections between literature and the environment from the perspective of the oppressions of race, class, gender, and nature, and the first to review American Indian literature from the standpoint of environmental justice and ecocriticism. By examining such texts as Sherman Alexie's short stories and Leslie Marmon Silko's novel Almanac of the Dead, Adamson contends that these works, in addition to being literary, are examples of ecological criticism that expand Euro-American concepts of nature and place. Adamson shows that when we begin exploring the differences that shape diverse cultural and literary representations of nature, we discover the challenge they present to mainstream American culture, environmentalism, and literature. By comparing the work of Native authors such as Simon Ortiz with that of environmental writers such as Edward Abbey, she reveals opportunities for more multicultural conceptions of nature and the environment. More than a work of literary criticism, this is a book about the search to find ways to understand our cultural and historical differences and similarities in order to arrive at a better agreement of what the human role in nature is and should be. It exposes the blind spots in early ecocriticism and shows the possibilities for building common groundÑ a middle placeÑ where writers, scholars, teachers, and environmentalists might come together to work for social and environmental change.


Masterpieces Of American Indian Literature

Author by : Willis Goth Regier
Languange : en
Publisher by : U of Nebraska Press
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Total Read : 37
Total Download : 275
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Description : The five complete and unabridged works collected here are parts of a long and passionate testimony about American Indian culture as related by Indians themselves. Deep emotions and life-shaking crises converge in these pages concerning identity, family, community, caste, gender, nature, the future, the past, solitude, duty, trust, betrayal, leadership, war, and apocalypse. Each work is also regarded as a classic of Native literature and has much to teach. ø The Life of Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh (1847) by George Copway, a Canadian Ojibwe writer and lecturer, describes his unique and difficult cultural journey from the tiny village of his youth to the legislatures of the world, speaking for the rights and sovereignty of Indians. ø The Soul of the Indian (1911) by Charles Eastman, a physician and mixed-blood Sioux, depicts ?the religious life of the typical American Indian as it was before he knew the white man.? ø American Indian Stories (1921) by Zitkala-?a, one of the most famous Sioux writers and activists of the modern era, includes legends and tales from oral tradition, childhood stories, and allegorical fiction. ø Coyote Stories (1933) by Mourning Dove, an Okanagan writer, retells the popular trickster tales of Coyote, the most resilient character in all of American literature. ø Black Elk Speaks (1932) as told through John G. Neihardt, is the spacious religious vision and candid life story of a Lakota holy man. Neihardt and Black Elk collaborated to produce a unique and inspirational work.


American Indian Literary Nationalism

Author by : Jace Weaver
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNM Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 27
Total Download : 754
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Description : A study of Native literature from the perspective of national sovereignty and self-determination.


Four Masterworks Of American Indian Literature

Author by : John Bierhorst
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Arizona Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 92
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Description : These stories represent the Aztec, Iroquois, Maya, and Sioux cultures


The Way

Author by : Shirley Hill Witt
Languange : en
Publisher by : Vintage
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 70
Total Download : 432
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Description : Reveals the way of life and culture of the American Indian through writings which convey his hopes, struggles, and despair


American Indian Literature And The Southwest

Author by : Eric Gary Anderson
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Texas Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 19
Total Download : 140
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Description : Culture-to-culture encounters between "natives" and "aliens" have gone on for centuries in the American Southwest—among American Indian tribes, between American Indians and Euro-Americans, and even, according to some, between humans and extraterrestrials at Roswell, New Mexico. Drawing on a wide range of cultural productions including novels, films, paintings, comic strips, and historical studies, this groundbreaking book explores the Southwest as both a real and a culturally constructed site of migration and encounter, in which the very identities of "alien" and "native" shift with each act of travel. Eric Anderson pursues his inquiry through an unprecedented range of cultural texts. These include the Roswell spacecraft myths, Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the Dead, Wendy Rose's poetry, the outlaw narratives of Billy the Kid, Apache autobiographies by Geronimo and Jason Betzinez, paintings by Georgia O'Keeffe, New West history by Patricia Nelson Limerick, Frank Norris' McTeague, Mary Austin's The Land of Little Rain, Sarah Winnemucca's Life Among the Piutes, Willa Cather's The Professor's House, George Herriman's modernist comic strip Krazy Kat, and A. A. Carr's Navajo-vampire novel Eye Killers.


Deep Waters

Author by : Christopher B. Teuton
Languange : en
Publisher by : U of Nebraska Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 82
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Description : Weaving connections between indigenous modes of oral storytelling, visual depiction, and contemporary American Indian literature,Deep Watersdemonstrates the continuing relationship between traditional and contemporary Native American systems of creative representation and signification. Christopher B. Teuton begins with a study of Mesoamerican writings, Dine sand paintings, and Haudenosaunee wampum belts. He proposes a theory of how and why indigenous oral and graphic means of recording thought are interdependent, their functions and purposes determined by social, political, and cultural contexts. The center of this book examines four key works of contemporary American Indian literature by N. Scott Momaday, Gerald Vizenor, Ray A. Young Bear, and Robert J. Conley. Through a textually grounded exploration of what Teuton calls the oral impulse, the graphic impulse, and the critical impulse, we see how and why various types of contemporary Native literary production are interrelated and draw upon long-standing indigenous methods of creative representation. Teuton breaks down the disabling binary of orality and literacy, offering readers a cogent, historically informed theory of indigenous textuality that allows for deeper readings of Native American cultural and literary expression.


Reconstructing The Native South

Author by : Melanie Benson Taylor
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Georgia Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 29
Total Download : 545
File Size : 45,8 Mb
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Description : In Reconstructing the Native South, Melanie Benson Taylor examines the diverse body of Native American literature in the contemporary U.S. South--literature written by the descendants of tribes who evaded Removal and have maintained ties with their southeastern homelands. In so doing Taylor advances a provocative, even counterintuitive claim: that the U.S. South and its Native American survivors have far more in common than mere geographical proximity. Both cultures have long been haunted by separate histories of loss and nostalgia, Taylor contends, and the moments when those experiences converge in explicit and startling ways have yet to be investigated by scholars. These convergences often bear the scars of protracted colonial antagonism, appropriation, and segregation, and they share preoccupations with land, sovereignty, tradition, dispossession, subjugation, purity, and violence. Taylor poses difficult questions in this work. In the aftermath of Removal and colonial devastation, what remains--for Native and non-Native southerners--to be recovered? Is it acceptable to identify an Indian "lost cause"? Is a deep sense of hybridity and intercultural affiliation the only coherent way forward, both for the New South and for its oldest inhabitants? And in these newly entangled, postcolonial environments, has global capitalism emerged as the new enemy for the twenty-first century? Reconstructing the Native South is a compellingly original work that contributes to conversations in Native American, southern, and transnational American studies.