An Autobiography Of Black Chicago

Author by : Dempsey Travis
Languange : en
Publisher by : Agate Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 63
Total Download : 909
File Size : 42,6 Mb
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Description : Few were more qualified than Dempsey Travis to write the history of African Americans in Chicago, and none would be able to do it with the same command of firsthand sources. This seminal paperback reissue, An Autobiography of Black Chicago, emulates the best works of Studs Terkel — portraying the African American Chicago community through the personal experiences of Dempsey Travis, his family, and his fellow Chicagoans. Through his family's and his own experiences, plus those of the book's numerous well-respected contributors, Travis tells a comprehensive, intimate story of African Americans in Chicago. Starting with John Baptiste Point du Sable, who was the first non–Native American to settle on the mouth of the Chicago River, and ending with Travis's successes providing equal housing opportunities for Chicago African Americans, An Autobiography of Black Chicago acquaints the reader with the city's most prominent African American figures — told through their own words.


An Autobiography Of Black Jazz

Author by : Dempsey Travis
Languange : en
Publisher by : Chicago, Ill. : Urban Research Institute
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 48
Total Download : 923
File Size : 40,8 Mb
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Description : Black singers, musicians, comedians, and performers reminisce about their lives and careers, their fellow entertainers, and famous jazz clubs


The Rise Of Chicago S Black Metropolis 1920 1929

Author by : Christopher Robert Reed
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Illinois Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 238
File Size : 48,6 Mb
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Description : During the Roaring '20s, African Americans rapidly transformed their Chicago into a "black metropolis." In this book, Christopher Robert Reed describes the rise of African Americans in Chicago's political economy, bringing to life the fleeting vibrancy of this dynamic period of racial consciousness and solidarity. Reed shows how African Americans rapidly transformed Chicago and achieved political and economic recognition by building on the massive population growth after the Great Migration from the South, the entry of a significant working class into the city's industrial work force, and the proliferation of black churches. Mapping out the labor issues and the struggle for control of black politics and black business, Reed offers an unromanticized view of the entrepreneurial efforts of black migrants, reassessing previous accounts such as St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton's 1945 study Black Metropolis. Utilizing a wide range of historical data, The Rise of Chicago's Black Metropolis, 1920–1929 delineates a web of dynamic social forces to shed light on black businesses and the establishment of a black professional class. The exquisitely researched volume draws on fictional and nonfictional accounts of the era, black community guides, mainstream and community newspapers, contemporary scholars and activists, and personal interviews.


From The Bullet To The Ballot

Author by : Jakobi Williams
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNC Press Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 66
Total Download : 125
File Size : 40,9 Mb
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Description : In this comprehensive history of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party (ILBPP), Chicago native Jakobi Williams demonstrates that the city's Black Power movement was both a response to and an extension of the city's civil rights movement. Williams focuses on the life and violent death of Fred Hampton, a charismatic leader who served as president of the NAACP Youth Council and continued to pursue a civil rights agenda when he became chairman of the revolutionary Chicago-based Black Panther Party. Framing the story of Hampton and the ILBPP as a social and political history and using, for the first time, sealed secret police files in Chicago and interviews conducted with often reticent former members of the ILBPP, Williams explores how Hampton helped develop racial coalitions between the ILBPP and other local activists and organizations. Williams also recounts the history of the original Rainbow Coalition, created in response to Richard J. Daley's Democratic machine, to show how the Panthers worked to create an antiracist, anticlass coalition to fight urban renewal, political corruption, and police brutality.


Urban Green

Author by : Colin Fisher
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNC Press Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 53
Total Download : 725
File Size : 48,5 Mb
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Description : In early twentieth-century America, affluent city-dwellers made a habit of venturing out of doors and vacationing in resorts and national parks. Yet the rich and the privileged were not the only ones who sought respite in nature. In this pathbreaking book, historian Colin Fisher demonstrates that working-class white immigrants and African Americans in rapidly industrializing Chicago also fled the urban environment during their scarce leisure time. If they had the means, they traveled to wilderness parks just past the city limits as well as to rural resorts in Wisconsin and Michigan. But lacking time and money, they most often sought out nature within the city itself--at urban parks and commercial groves, along the Lake Michigan shore, even in vacant lots. Chicagoans enjoyed a variety of outdoor recreational activities in these green spaces, and they used them to forge ethnic and working-class community. While narrating a crucial era in the history of Chicago's urban development, Fisher makes important interventions in debates about working-class leisure, the history of urban parks, environmental justice, the African American experience, immigration history, and the cultural history of nature.


Louis Armstrong Master Of Modernism

Author by : Thomas Brothers
Languange : en
Publisher by : W. W. Norton & Company
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 32
Total Download : 621
File Size : 46,9 Mb
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Description : Finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Biography. "Profoundly evocative and altogether admirable…The writing and detail are so brilliant that I found the volume revelatory." —Tim Page, Washington Post Nearly 100 years after bursting onto Chicago’s music scene under the tutelage of Joe "King" Oliver, Louis Armstrong is recognized as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. A trumpet virtuoso, seductive crooner, and consummate entertainer, Armstrong laid the foundation for the future of jazz with his stylistic innovations, but his story would be incomplete without examining how he struggled in a society seething with brutally racist ideologies, laws, and practices. Thomas Brothers picks up where he left off with the acclaimed Louis Armstrong's New Orleans, following the story of the great jazz musician into his most creatively fertile years in the 1920s and early 1930s, when Armstrong created not one but two modern musical styles. Brothers wields his own tremendous skill in making the connections between history and music accessible to everyone as Armstrong shucks and jives across the page. Through Brothers's expert ears and eyes we meet an Armstrong whose quickness and sureness, so evident in his performances, served him well in his encounters with racism while his music soared across the airwaves into homes all over America. Louis Armstrong, Master of Modernism blends cultural history, musical scholarship, and personal accounts from Armstrong's contemporaries to reveal his enduring contributions to jazz and popular music at a time when he and his bandmates couldn’t count on food or even a friendly face on their travels across the country. Thomas Brothers combines an intimate knowledge of Armstrong's life with the boldness to examine his place in such a racially charged landscape. In vivid prose and with vibrant photographs, Brothers illuminates the life and work of the man many consider to be the greatest American musician of the twentieth century.


Toward An Intellectual History Of Black Women

Author by : Mia E. Bay
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNC Press Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 69
Total Download : 833
File Size : 42,5 Mb
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Description : Despite recent advances in the study of black thought, black women intellectuals remain often neglected. This collection of essays by fifteen scholars of history and literature establishes black women's places in intellectual history by engaging the work of writers, educators, activists, religious leaders, and social reformers in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean. Dedicated to recovering the contributions of thinkers marginalized by both their race and their gender, these essays uncover the work of unconventional intellectuals, both formally educated and self-taught, and explore the broad community of ideas in which their work participated. The end result is a field-defining and innovative volume that addresses topics ranging from religion and slavery to the politicized and gendered reappraisal of the black female body in contemporary culture. Contributors are Mia E. Bay, Judith Byfield, Alexandra Cornelius, Thadious Davis, Corinne T. Field, Arlette Frund, Kaiama L. Glover, Farah J. Griffin, Martha S. Jones, Natasha Lightfoot, Sherie Randolph, Barbara D. Savage, Jon Sensbach, Maboula Soumahoro, and Cheryl Wall.


Black Writing From Chicago

Author by : Richard Guzman
Languange : en
Publisher by : SIU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 41
Total Download : 152
File Size : 40,6 Mb
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Description : Ranging from 1861 to the present day, an anthology of works by many of Chicago's leading black writers includes poetry, fiction, drama, essays, journalism, and historical and social commentary, by W. E. B. Du Bois, Gwendolyn Brooks, Lorraine Hansberry, Langston Hughes, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, Charles Johnson, and many others. Simultaneous.


Visionary Women Writers Of Chicago S Black Arts Movement

Author by : Carmen L. Phelps
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 11
Total Download : 346
File Size : 46,6 Mb
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Description :


Reading African American Autobiography

Author by : Eric D. Lamore
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Wisconsin Pres
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 36
Total Download : 652
File Size : 55,5 Mb
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Description : From the 1760s to Barack Obama, this collection offers fresh looks at classic African American life narratives; highlights neglected African American lives, texts, and genres; and discusses the diverse outpouring of twenty-first-century memoirs.