Screening Asian Americans

Author by : Peter X. Feng
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rutgers University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 86
Total Download : 904
File Size : 51,7 Mb
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Description : This innovative essay collection explores Asian American cinematic representations historically and socially, on and off screen, as they contribute to the definition of American character. The history of Asian Americans on movie screens, as outlined in Peter X Feng's introduction, provides a context for the individual readings that follow. Asian American cinema is charted in its diversity, ranging across activist, documentary, experimental, and fictional modes, and encompassing a wide range of ethnicities (Filipino, Vietnamese, Indian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Taiwanese). Covered in the discussion are filmmakers—Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Ang Lee, Trinh T. Minh-ha, and Wayne Wang—and films such as The Wedding Banquet, Surname Viet Given Name Nam, and Chan is Missing. Throughout the volume, as Feng explains, the term screening has a twofold meaning—referring to the projection of Asian Americans as cinematic bodies and the screening out of elements connected with these images. In this doubling, film representation can function to define what is American and what is foreign. Asian American filmmaking is one of the fastest growing areas of independent and studio production. This volume is key to understanding the vitality of this new cinema.


Distinguished Asian Americans

Author by : Dorothy C. L. Cordova
Languange : en
Publisher by : Greenwood Publishing Group
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 93
Total Download : 587
File Size : 48,9 Mb
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Description : Profiles distinguished Asian Americans ranging from historical figures to athletes and including both prominent and less familiar individuals who have made significant contributions in their fields.


Asian Americans

Author by : Sucheng Chan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Twayne Publishers
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 68
Total Download : 126
File Size : 49,6 Mb
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Description : Traces the history of Asian immigration from the California gold rush to Vietnamese boat people, describes patterns of work, social adaptation, and family formation, and explains how they coped with discrimination


Asian Americans

Author by : James Robert Flynn
Languange : en
Publisher by : Psychology Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 98
Total Download : 281
File Size : 53,8 Mb
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Description : This authoritative book shows how the gap between a group's mean IQ and achievement can be precisely measured, and then partitioned between two factors -- an important methodology with potential application for all ethnic groups. In this case, the author shows that Chinese Americans' occupational achievements are generally far beyond their IQ -- as if they had a mean IQ 21 points higher than they actually do. This unique approach to explaining group achievement emphasizes non-IQ factors such as historical origins, family, work ethic, educational tradition, personality traits, and social institutions.


Asian Americans

Author by : Lin Zhan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Jones & Bartlett Learning
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 48
Total Download : 168
File Size : 55,8 Mb
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Description : "Chapters of this book focus on issues, needs, and assets of underserved, underresearched Asian Americans populations-refugees, Vietnam veterns, battered women, immigrant elders, Asian Americans with disabilities, Cambodian and Vietnamese youth, gays and lesbians, and Chinatown residents. Contributors to this book critically analyze the interplay of culture, immigration, and social and political contexts in relation to the vulnerability of Asian Americans. From the preface.


Asian Americans In New England

Author by : Monica Chiu
Languange : en
Publisher by : UPNE
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 69
Total Download : 506
File Size : 47,8 Mb
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Description : The first interdisciplinary contribution to studies about Asian Americans in New England


Emerging Voices

Author by : Huping Ling
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rutgers University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 46
Total Download : 978
File Size : 45,6 Mb
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Description : While a growing number of popular and scholarly works focus on Asian Americans, most are devoted to the experiences of larger groups such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, and Indian Americans. As the field grows, there is a pressing need to understand the smaller and more recent immigrant communities. Emerging Voices fills this gap with its unique and compelling discussion of underrepresented groups, including Burmese, Indonesian, Mong, Hmong, Nepalese, Romani, Tibetan, and Thai Americans. Unlike the earlier and larger groups of Asian immigrants to America, many of whom made the choice to emigrate to seek better economic opportunities, many of the groups discussed in this volume fled war or political persecution in their homeland. Forced to make drastic transitions in America with little physical or psychological preparation, questions of "why am I here," "who am I," and "why am I discriminated against," remain at the heart of their post-emigration experiences. Bringing together eminent scholars from a variety of disciplines, this collection considers a wide range of themes, including assimilation and adaptation, immigration patterns, community, education, ethnicity, economics, family, gender, marriage, religion, sexuality, and work.


Asian American

Author by : David Palumbo-Liu
Languange : en
Publisher by : Stanford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 225
File Size : 48,5 Mb
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Description : This book argues that the invention of Asian American identities serves as an index to the historical formation of modern America. By tracing constructions of "Asian American" to an interpenetrating dynamic between Asia and America, the author obtains a deeper understanding of key issues in American culture, history, and society. The formation of America in the twentieth century has had everything to do with "westward expansion" across the "Pacific frontier" and the movement of Asians onto American soil. After the passage of the last piece of anti-Asian legislation in the 1930's, the United States found it had to grapple with both the presence of Asians already in America and the imperative to develop its neocolonial interests in East Asia. The author argues that, under these double imperatives, a great wall between "Asian" and "American" is constructed precisely when the two threatened to merge. Yet the very incompleteness of American identity has allowed specific and contingent fusion of "Asian" and "American" at particular historical junctures. From the importation of Asian labor in the mid-nineteenth century, the territorialization of Hawaii and the Philippines in the late-nineteenth century, through wars with Japan, Korea, and Vietnam and the Cold War with China, to today's Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation group, the United States in the modern age has seen its national identity as strongly attached to the Pacific. As this has taken place, so has the formation of a variety of Asian American identities. Each contains a specific notion of America and reveals a particular conception of "Asian" and "American." Complicating the usual notion of "identity politics" and drawing on a wide range of writings—sociological, historical, cultural, medical, anthropological, geographic, economic, journalistic, and political—the author studies both how the formation of these identifications discloses the response of America to the presence of Asians and how Asian Americans themselves have inhabited these roles and resisted such categorizations, inventing their own particular subjectivities as Americans.


Asian Americans An Encyclopedia Of Social Cultural Economic And Political History 3 Volumes

Author by : Xiaojian Zhao
Languange : en
Publisher by : ABC-CLIO
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 160
File Size : 53,5 Mb
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Description : This is the most comprehensive and up-to-date reference work on Asian Americans, comprising three volumes that address a broad range of topics on various Asian and Pacific Islander American groups from 1848 to the present day. • Presents information on Asian Americans and individual Asian ethnic groups that provides comprehensive overviews of the respective groups • Includes special topic entries that contain source information regarding major historical events • Comprises work from a truly outstanding list of contributors that include scholars, journalists, writers, community activists, graduate students, and other specialists • Expands the boundaries of Asian American studies through innovative entries that address transnationalism, gender and sexuality, and inter- and cross-disciplinarity


Asian American History A Very Short Introduction

Author by : Madeline Y. Hsu
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 94
Total Download : 132
File Size : 51,8 Mb
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Description : A 2012 survey by the Pew Research Center reported that Asian Americans are the best-educated, highest-income, and best-assimilated racial group in the United States. Before reaching this level of economic success and social assimilation, however, Asian immigrants' path was full of difficult, even demeaning, moments. This book provides a sweeping and nuanced history of Asian Americans, revealing how and why the perception of Asian immigrants changed over time. Asian migrants, in large part Chinese, arrived in significant numbers on the West Coast during the 1850s and 1860s to work in gold mining and on the construction of the transcontinental Railroad. Unlike their contemporary European counterparts, Asians, often stigmatized as "coolies," challenged American ideals of equality with the problem of whether all racial groups could be integrated into America's democracy. The fear of the "Yellow Peril" soon spurred an array of legislative and institutional efforts to segregate them through immigration laws, restrictions on citizenship, and limits on employment, property ownership, access to public services, and civil rights. Prejudices against Asian Americans reached a peak during World War II, when Japanese Americans were interned en masse. It was only with changes in the immigration laws and the social and political activism of the 1960s and 1970s that Asian Americans gained ground and acceptance, albeit in the still stereotyped category of "model minorities." Madeline Y. Hsu weaves a fascinating historical narrative of this "American Dream." She shows how Asian American success, often attributed to innate cultural values, is more a result of the immigration laws, which have largely pre-selected immigrants of high economic and social potential. Asian Americans have, in turn, been used by politicians to bludgeon newer (and more populous) immigrant groups for their purported lack of achievement. Hsu deftly reveals how public policy, which can restrict and also selectively promote certain immigrant populations, is a key reason why some immigrant groups appear to be more naturally successful and why the identity of those groups evolves differently from others.