Black Power And Black Religion

Author by : Richard Newman
Languange : en
Publisher by : Locust Hill Pr
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 28
Total Download : 632
File Size : 54,5 Mb
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The Religion Of Black Power

Author by : Vincent Harding
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 32
Total Download : 630
File Size : 48,5 Mb
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Black Religion And Black Radicalism

Author by : Gayraud S. Wilmore
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 78
Total Download : 648
File Size : 41,9 Mb
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Description : Since its first publication 25 years ago Black Religion and Black Radicalism has established itself as the classic treatment of African American religious history. Wilmore shows to what extent the history of African Americans can be told in terms of religion, and to what extent this religious history has been inseparably bound to the struggle for freedom and justice. From the story of the slave rebellions and emancipation, to the rise of Black nationalism and the freedom struggles of recent times, up through the development of Black, womanist, and Afrocentric theologies, Wilmore offers an essential interpretation of African American religious history.


Exodus

Author by : Eddie S. Glaude
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 28
Total Download : 999
File Size : 43,9 Mb
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Description : No other story in the Bible has fired the imaginations of African Americans quite like that of Exodus. Its tale of suffering and the journey to redemption offered hope and a sense of possibility to people facing seemingly insurmountable evil. Exodus! shows how this biblical story inspired a pragmatic tradition of racial advocacy among African Americans in the early nineteenth century—a tradition based not on race but on a moral politics of respectability. Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., begins by comparing the historical uses of Exodus by black and white Americans and the concepts of "nation" it generated. He then traces the roles that Exodus played in the National Negro Convention movement, from its first meeting in 1830 to 1843, when the convention decided—by one vote—against supporting Henry Highland Garnet's call for slave insurrection. Exodus! reveals the deep historical roots of debates over African-American national identity that continue to rage today. It will engage anyone interested in the story of black nationalism and the promise of African-American religious culture.


Black Theology 1966 1979

Author by : James H. Cone
Languange : en
Publisher by : Black Theology
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 38
Total Download : 242
File Size : 54,9 Mb
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Description : First published in 1979, this is the classic sourcebook for the emergence of Black Thelogy in the United States. Born out of the Civil Rights Movement and the emerging demand for Black Power, Black Theology has tried for 25 years to relate the gospel to the African-American experience of oppression and struggle for liberation. This revised volume contains a new introduction, many additional essays, and a revised bibliography .


Peoples Temple And Black Religion In America

Author by : Rebecca Moore
Languange : en
Publisher by : Indiana University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 51
Total Download : 804
File Size : 54,6 Mb
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Description : The Peoples Temple movement ended on November 18, 1978, when more than 900 men, women, and children died in a ritual of murder and suicide in their utopianist community of Jonestown, Guyana. Only a handful lived to tell their story. As is well known, Jim Jones, the leader of Peoples Temple, was white, but most of his followers were black. Despite that, little has been written about Peoples Temple in the context of black religion in America. In 10 essays, writers from various disciplines address this gap in the scholarship. Twenty-five years after the tragedy at Jonestown, they assess the impact of the black religious experience on Peoples Temple.


Kwanzaa

Author by : Keith A. Mayes
Languange : en
Publisher by : Taylor & Francis
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 71
Total Download : 513
File Size : 42,8 Mb
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Description : Kwanzaa: Black Power and the Making of the African-American Holiday Tradition explores the beginning and expansion of Kwanzaa, from its start as a Black Power holiday, to its place as one of the most mainstream black holiday traditions.


African American Religious Thought

Author by : Cornel West
Languange : en
Publisher by : Westminster John Knox Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 59
Total Download : 201
File Size : 43,9 Mb
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Description : Believing that African American religious studies has reached a crossroads, Cornel West and Eddie Glaude seek, in this landmark anthology, to steer the discipline into the future. Arguing that the complexity of beliefs, choices, and actions of African Americans need not be reduced to expressions of black religion, West and Glaude call for more careful reflection on the complex relationships of African American religious studies to conceptions of class, gender, sexual orientation, race, empire, and other values that continue to challenge our democratic ideals.


Christianity On Trial

Author by : Mark L. Chapman
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wipf and Stock Publishers
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 72
Total Download : 606
File Size : 51,7 Mb
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Description : Since slavery times African-American religious thinkers have struggled to answer this question: Is Christianity a source of liberation or a source of oppression? In a study that reviews representative thinkers over the last fifty years, Mark Chapman reviews the variety of ways that African-Americans have addressed this problem and how it has informed their work and lives. Beginning with Benjamin Mays, the leading Negro theologian of the post-World War II period, Chapman explores the critical implications of this question right up to the present day. The pivotal turning point in this period is the emergence of the Black Power movement in the 1960s. Sparked in part by the challenge of the Black Muslims, for whom Christianity was simply the white man's religion, inherently racist and oppressive, the era of Black Power saw the rise of militant Black theologies as well. After analyzing the work of the Muslim Elijah Muhammad, Chapman turns to the pioneering work of Black theologians Albert Cleage and James H. Cone. Chapman demonstrates the differences but also uncovers surprising lines of continuity between the older Negro theologians and the later Black theologians, particularly in their efforts to uncover the truly liberative potential of Christianity. 'Christianity on Trial' concludes by exploring the recent emergence of womanist theology. As articulated by Delores S. Williams and other African-American women, womanist theology challenges not only the patriarchal aspects of historical Christianity, but the same limitations in previous Black theologies.


Jesus Jobs And Justice

Author by : Bettye Collier-Thomas
Languange : en
Publisher by : Knopf
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 82
Total Download : 570
File Size : 43,6 Mb
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Description : “The Negroes must have Jesus, Jobs, and Justice,” declared Nannie Helen Burroughs, a nationally known figure among black and white leaders and an architect of the Woman’s Convention of the National Baptist Convention. Burroughs made this statement about the black women’s agenda in 1958, as she anticipated the collapse of Jim Crow segregation and pondered the fate of African Americans. Following more than half a century of organizing and struggling against racism in American society, sexism in the National Baptist Convention, and the racism and paternalism of white women and the Southern Baptist Convention, Burroughs knew that black Americans would need more than religion to survive and to advance socially, economically, and politically. Jesus, jobs, and justice are the threads that weave through two hundred years of black women’s experiences in America. Bettye Collier-Thomas’s groundbreaking book gives us a remarkable account of the religious faith, social and political activism, and extraordinary resilience of black women during the centuries of American growth and change. It shows the beginnings of organized religion in slave communities and how the Bible was a source of inspiration; the enslaved saw in their condition a parallel to the suffering and persecution that Jesus had endured. The author makes clear that while religion has been a guiding force in the lives of most African Americans, for black women it has been essential. As co-creators of churches, women were a central factor in their development. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice explores the ways in which women had to cope with sexism in black churches, as well as racism in mostly white denominations, in their efforts to create missionary societies and form women’s conventions. It also reveals the hidden story of how issues of sex and sexuality have sometimes created tension and divisions within institutions. Black church women created national organizations such as the National Association of Colored Women, the National League of Colored Republican Women, and the National Council of Negro Women. They worked in the interracial movement, in white-led Christian groups such as the YWCA and Church Women United, and in male-dominated organizations such as the NAACP and National Urban League to demand civil rights, equal employment, and educational opportunities, and to protest lynching, segregation, and discrimination. And black women missionaries sacrificed their lives in service to their African sisters whose destiny they believed was tied to theirs. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice restores black women to their rightful place in American and black history and demonstrates their faith in themselves, their race, and their God. From the Hardcover edition.