Appointment Of The Chair Of The Charity Commission

Author by : Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Public Administration Select Committee
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Charity Commission

Author by : Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Committee of Public Accounts
Languange : en
Publisher by : Stationery Office
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Total Read : 52
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Description : This report examines the Cup Trust and the Charity Commission's procedures for regulating charities. The Charity Commission (the Commission) registered the Cup Trust (the Trust) as a charity in April 2009, with a company called Mountstar - based in the British Virgin Islands - as its only trustee. Although the Trust generated ’income' of £176 million, only £55,000 has been given to charitable causes, and the Cup Trust claimed Gift Aid of £46 million. Despite its declared charitable aims, it is clear that the Trust was set up as a tax avoidance scheme by people known to be in the business of tax avoidance. The Trust does not meet the public expectations of a charity and it is unacceptable that the Commission has not been able to put a stop to this abuse of charitable status. The Commission began to investigate the Trust in March 2010 following concerns raised about its governance and fundraising. This investigation closed in March 2012. The Commission eventually concluded that it could not de-register the Trust as it was "legally structured as a charity", despite not being for exclusively charitable purposes. The Commission has not yet brought forward proposals to change the law to exclude organisations like the Cup Trust from the register. In the last 25 years, the Committee and the NAO have repeatedly found severe shortcomings in the Commission's performance, particularly in relation to investigation and enforcement. The Commission hardly makes use of its statutory powers, nor is it targeting its available resources to best effect.


The Role Of The Charity Commission And Public Benefit

Author by : Great Britain: Parliament: House of Commons: Public Administration Select Committee
Languange : en
Publisher by : The Stationery Office
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Total Read : 54
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Description : This report into the implementation of the Charities Act 2006 finds the Charity Commission being asked to do too much, with too little. The charitable sector is at the heart of UK society, involving millions of people and £9.3 billion received in donations in 2011/2012. Around 25 new applications for charitable status are received by the Charity Commission every working day. Among the reports findings are: one of the keys tests set by the Charities Act 2006 for determining charitable status-the public benefit test-is critically flawed; the Government should revise the statutory objectives for the Charity Commission, to allow the Commission to focus its limited resources on regulating the sector; the proposal to increase the financial threshold for compulsory registration of a charity with the Charity Commission should be rejected; charities should publish their spending on campaigning and political activity. PASC criticises the way the Charity Commission has interpreted public benefit under the Act. The Committee also considered the impact of face-to-face fundraising, or "chugging"-on the street or on the doorstep-and warns that self-regulation has failed so far to generate the level of public confidence which is essential to maintain the reputation of the charitable sector. The evidence was clear that the regulation of fundraising remains a concern for many members of the public. Two in three people have reported feeling uncomfortable as a result of the fundraising methods used by some charities.


National Audit Office Charity Commission The Cup Trust Hc 814

Author by : Great Britain. National Audit Office
Languange : en
Publisher by : The Stationery Office
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National Audit Office Charity Commission The Regulatory Effectiveness Of The Charity Commossion Hc 813

Author by : Great Britain: National Audit Office
Languange : en
Publisher by : The Stationery Office
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Total Read : 42
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Description : The Charity Commission is not regulating charities effectively and there is a gap between what the public expects of the Commission and what it actually does. The NAO has concluded that the Commission does not do enough to identify and tackle abuse of charitable status. Between 2007-08 and 2013-14, the Commission's annual budget fell 40 per cent in real terms to £22.7 million but the number of main registered charities has remained fairly constant at around 160,000. In response to budget cuts, the Commission has reviewed how it works and successfully reduced demand for its services, but it has not identified what budget it would need to regulate effectively. The Commission makes little use of its enforcement powers, for example suspending only two trustees and removing none in 2012-13. And it can be slow to act when investigating regulatory concerns. The NAO found cases where periods of several months passed during which the Commission took no action. Furthermore, the Charity Commission does not take tough enough action in some of the most serious regulatory cases. It is also reactive rather than proactive, making insufficient use of the information it holds to identify risk. The Charity Commission needs to think radically about alternative ways of meeting its objectives with constrained resources. It also needs to make greater use of its statutory powers in line with its objective of maintaining confidence in the sector; and develop an approach to identify and deal with those few trustees who deliberately abuse charitable status. This report publishes alongside another NAO report, the Cup Trust.


Charity Commission Expenses Copy Of All Correspondence Between The Charity Commissioners And The Treasury Upon The Question Of The Taxation Of Charities In Order To Meet The Expenses Of The Charity Commission

Author by : Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons
Languange : en
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Total Read : 87
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Decisions Of The Charity Commissioners

Author by : Charity Commission
Languange : en
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Endowed Charities County Of Carnarvon

Author by : Great Britain. Charity Commission
Languange : en
Publisher by :
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Total Read : 25
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Management Etc Of The Tancred Charities Decayed Indigent Gentlemen

Author by : Charity Commission
Languange : en
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Total Read : 60
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Joint Committee On The Draft Charities Bill

Author by : Great Britain: Parliament: Joint Committee on the Draft Charities Bill
Languange : en
Publisher by : The Stationery Office
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Total Read : 65
Total Download : 831
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Description : The focus of this report is on the voluntary or not-for-profit organisations which are charities, and other organisations with charitable, philanthropic and benevolent purposes, many of which raise funds from the public including campaign groups. The Draft Bill aims to modernize charity law, allowing many campaigning and social justice groups to attain charitable status. In England and Wales 188,739 charities are registered with the Charity Commission, with a total income of £32 billion raised by the major charities. There are 471 charities, 0.29 per cent of those registered, which represent 45 per cent of the total income, two-thirds of charities actually have an income of £10,000 or less. The Joint Committee sets out 54 recommendations and conclusions, among them are: that the Bill should include a definition of religion; that there should be an additional charitable purpose of promoting religion, racial harmony and advancement of culture; that an account should be taken of the loss of assets to a charity, if it loses charitable status; that an independent review should look at the burden of regulation that charities face; that the Charity Commission should inform the charities the reason for any investigation and that compensation and costs can be awarded against the Commission.