Chicano Education In The Era Of Segregation

Author by : Gilbert G. Gonzalez
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of North Texas Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 98
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Description : Originally published: Philadelphia: Balch Institute Press, 1990.


Handbook Of Latinos And Education

Author by : Enrique G. Murillo Jr.
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 87
Total Download : 315
File Size : 44,7 Mb
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Description : Providing a comprehensive review of rigorous, innovative, and critical scholarship relevant to educational issues which impact Latinos, this Handbook captures the field at this point in time. Its unique purpose and function is to profile the scope and terrain of academic inquiry on Latinos and education. Presenting the most significant and potentially influential work in the field in terms of its contributions to research, to professional practice, and to the emergence of related interdisciplinary studies and theory, the volume is organized around five themes: history, theory, and methodology policies and politics language and culture teaching and learning resources and information. The Handbook of Latinos and Education is a must-have resource for educational researchers, graduate students, teacher educators, and the broad spectrum of individuals, groups, agencies, organizations and institutions sharing a common interest in and commitment to the educational issues that impact Latinos.


Chicano Educational Achievement

Author by : Elena Aragon de McKissack
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 19
Total Download : 364
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Description : First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


Strategies Of Segregation

Author by : David G. García
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 38
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Description : Strategies of Segregation unearths the ideological and structural architecture of enduring racial inequality within and beyond schools in Oxnard, California. In this meticulously researched account, which focuses on the period from 1903 to 1974, David G. García excavates new archival sources to expose a separate and unequal education system and its purposeful links with racially restrictive housing covenants. He recovers powerful oral histories of Mexican Americans and African Americans who endured disparate treatment and protested discrimination. His analysis is skillfully woven into a compelling narrative that culminates in an examination of one of the nation’s first desegregation cases filed jointly by Mexican American and Black plaintiffs. This transdisciplinary history advances our understanding of racism and community resistance across time and place.


The Other Struggle For Equal Schools

Author by : Rubén Donato
Languange : en
Publisher by : SUNY Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 62
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Description : Examining the Mexican American struggle for equal education during the 1960s and 1970s in the Southwest in general and in a California community in particular, Donato challenges conventional wisdom that Mexican Americans were passive victims, accepting their educational fates. He looks at how Mexican American parents confronted the relative tranquility of school governance, how educators responded to increasing numbers of Mexican Americans in schools, how school officials viewed problems faced by Mexican American children, and why educators chose specific remedies. Finally, he examines how federal, state, and local educational policies corresponded with the desires of the Mexican American community.


The Mexican American Experience

Author by : Matt S. Meier
Languange : en
Publisher by : Greenwood Publishing Group
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 60
Total Download : 184
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Description : A-to-Z entries covers this erumpent minority's experience from the arts to religion, popular culture, science, technology, business, and government.


American Education

Author by : Joel Spring
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 97
Total Download : 520
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Description : Joel Spring’s American Education introduces readers to the historical, political, social, and legal foundations of education and to the profession of teaching in the United States. In his signature straightforward and concise approach to describing complex issues, Spring illuminates events and topics and that are often overlooked or whitewashed, giving students the opportunity to engage in critical thinking about education. In this edition he looks closely at the global context of education in the U.S. Featuring current information and challenging perspectives—with scholarship that is often cited as a primary source, students will come away from this clear, authoritative text informed on the latest topics, issues, and data and with a strong knowledge of the forces shaping of the American educational system. Changes in the 17th Edition include new and updated material and statistics on economic theories related to "skills" education and employability the conflict between a skills approach and cultural diversity political differences regarding education among the Republican, Democratic, Libertarian and Green parties social mobility and equality of opportunity as related to schooling global migration and student diversity in US schools charter schools and home schooling


Integrations

Author by : Lawrence Blum
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 58
Total Download : 193
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Description : "Education plays a central part in the history of racial inequality in America, with people of color long advocating for equal educational rights and opportunities. Though school desegregation initially was a boon for educational equality, schools began to resegregate in the 1980s, and schools are now more segregated than ever. In Integrations, historian Zoë Burkholder and philosopher Lawrence Blum set out to shed needed light on the enduring problem of segregation in American schools. From a historical perspective, the authors analyze how ideas about race influenced the creation and development of American public schools. Importantly, the authors focus on multiple marginalized groups in American schooling: African Americans, Native Americans, Latinxs, and Asian Americans. In the second half of the book, the authors explore what equal education should and could look like. They argue for a conception of "educational goods" (including the development of moral and civic capacities) that should and can be provided to every child through schooling--including integration itself. Ultimately, the authors show that in order to grapple with integration in a meaningful way, we must think of integration in the plural, both in its multiple histories and the many possible meanings of and courses of action for integration"--


The Praeger Handbook Of Latino Education In The U S

Author by : Lourdes Diaz Soto
Languange : en
Publisher by : Greenwood Publishing Group
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 949
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Description : Latinos in the United States have fought hard to attain equality, especially in the field of education. This set of books focuses on the fight for equal educational access. The contributors reveal that many Latino children still face decades-old challenges. In addition to such obstacles as cultural conflicts and racism, they also face teachers, curricula, and assessments that are not always respectful to their backgrounds.


A Century Of Chicano History

Author by : Gilbert G. Gonzalez
Languange : en
Publisher by : Psychology Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 95
Total Download : 175
File Size : 47,7 Mb
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Description : The author employs a neo-Marxist approach to chronicle the story of Chicano history and culture in America, exploring the effects of U.S. economic expansionism on this long-lasting American sub-culture. Simultaneous.


Chicano School Failure And Success

Author by : Richard R. Valencia
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 64
Total Download : 110
File Size : 51,7 Mb
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Description : First published in 1991. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.


The American School

Author by : Joel Spring
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 58
Total Download : 961
File Size : 52,5 Mb
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Description : This current, comprehensive history of American education is designed to stimulate critical analysis and critical thinking by offering alternative interpretations of each historical period. In his signature straight-forward, concise style, Joel Spring provides a variety of interpretations of American schooling, from conservative to leftist, in order to spark the reader’s own critical thinking about history and schools. This tenth edition follows the history of American education from the seventeenth century to the integration into global capitalism of the twenty-first century to the tumultuous current political landscape. In particular, the updates focus on tracing the direct religious links between the colonial Puritans and the current-day Trump administration. Chapters 1 and 2 have been rewritten to take a closer look at religious traditions in American schools, leading up to the educational ideas of the current U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. An updated Chapter 15 further links traditional religious fundamentalist ideas and the twentieth century free market arguments of the Chicago school of economists to President Trump’s administration and the influence of the Alt-Right.


Chicano Students And The Courts

Author by : Richard R. Valencia
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 71
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File Size : 50,9 Mb
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Description : In 1925 Adolfo ‘Babe’ Romo, a Mexican American rancher in Tempe, Arizona, filed suit against his school district on behalf of his four young children, who were forced to attend a markedly low-quality segregated school, and won. But Romo v. Laird was just the beginning. Some sources rank Mexican Americans as one of the most poorly educated ethnic groups in the United States. Chicano Students and the Courts is a comprehensive look at this community’s long-standing legal struggle for better schools and educational equality. Through the lens of critical race theory, Valencia details why and how Mexican American parents and their children have been forced to resort to legal action. Chicano Students and the Courts engages the many areas that have spurred Mexican Americans to legal battle, including school segregation, financing, special education, bilingual education, school closures, undocumented students, higher education financing, and high-stakes testing, ultimately situating these legal efforts in the broader scope of the Mexican American community’s overall struggle for the right to an equal education. Extensively researched, and written by an author with firsthand experience in the courtroom as an expert witness in Mexican American education cases, this volume is the first to provide an in-depth understanding of the intersection of litigation and education vis-à-vis Mexican Americans.


Border Correspondent

Author by : Ruben Salazar
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 30
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Description : This first major collection of former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist Ruben Salazar's writings, is a testament to his pioneering role in the Mexican American community, in journalism, and in the evolution of race relations in the U.S. Taken together, the articles serve as a documentary history of the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and of the changing perspective of the nation as a whole. Since his tragic death while covering the massive Chicano antiwar moratorium in Los Angeles on August 29, 1970, Ruben Salazar has become a legend in the Chicano community. As a reporter and later as a columnist for the Los Angeles Times, Salazar was the first journalist of Mexican American background to cross over into the mainstream English-language press. He wrote extensively on the Mexican American community and served as a foreign correspondent in Latin America and Vietnam. This first major collection of Salazar's writing is a testament to his pioneering role in the Mexican American community, in journalism, and in the evolution of race relations in the United States. Taken together, the articles serve as a documentary history of the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and of the changing perspective of the nation as a whole. Border Correspondent presents selections from each period of Salazar's career. The stories and columns document a growing frustration with the Kennedy administration, a young César Chávez beginning to organize farm workers, the Vietnam War, and conflict between police and community in East Los Angeles. One of the first to take investigative journalism into the streets and jails, Salazar's first-hand accounts of his experiences with drug users and police, ordinary people and criminals, make compelling reading. Mario García's introduction provides a biographical sketch of Salazar and situates him in the context of American journalism and Chicano history. This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1996.


The Pursuit Of Racial And Ethnic Equality In American Public Schools

Author by : Kristi L. Bowman
Languange : en
Publisher by : MSU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 96
Total Download : 390
File Size : 54,6 Mb
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Description : In 1954 the Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education; ten years later, Congress enacted the Civil Rights Act. These monumental changes in American law dramatically expanded educational opportunities for racial and ethnic minority children across the country. They also changed the experiences of white children, who have learned in increasingly diverse classrooms. The authors of this commemorative volume include leading scholars in law, education, and public policy, as well as important historical figures. Taken together, the chapters trace the narrative arc of school desegregation in the United States, beginning in California in the 1940s, continuing through Brown v. Board, the Civil Rights Act, and three important Supreme Court decisions about school desegregation and voluntary integration in 1974, 1995, and 2007. The authors also assess the status of racial and ethnic equality in education today and consider the viability of future legal and policy reform in pursuit of the goals of Brown v. Board. This remarkable collection of voices in conversation with one another lays the groundwork for future discussions about the relationship between law and educational equality, and ultimately for the creation of new public policy. A valuable reference for scholars and students alike, this dynamic text is an important contribution to the literature by an outstanding group of authors.


Critical Theories Radical Pedagogies And Social Education

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : BRILL
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 92
Total Download : 892
File Size : 50,6 Mb
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Description : “A refreshing collection of essays that offers a range of critical and radical voices which are generally marginalized in the critical social studies ‘mainstream’ ... This collection is a good read with valuable insights that can impact teaching practice.”— Canadian Social Studies - Canada’s National Social Studies Journal - Volume 45 Issue 1


Historical Dictionary Of Women S Education In The United States

Author by : Linda Eisenmann
Languange : en
Publisher by : Greenwood Publishing Group
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 87
Total Download : 633
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Description : The history of women's education in the United States presents a continuous effort to move from the periphery to the mainstream, and this book examines both formal institutions and informal opportunities for girls and women. Not only were women long prevented from receiving an education because of their gender, but their formal educational opportunities were also greatly affected by race, class, and ethnicity. Denied formal education early on, women found ways of educating themselves informally through associations and reform movements. While individuals have been prominent, women's educational history also must be told through the institutions they created. This reference book presents an introductory essay and nearly 250 alphabetically arranged entries on events, ideas, movements, institutions, and persons in the history of women's education in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Each entry includes a brief bibliography, and the book concludes with a timeline of women's educational history and a list of works for further reading. The entries are written by expert contributors and reflect the geographic, racial, and socioeconomic diversity of schooling for girls and women throughout various eras of U.S. history.


The Evolution Of Deficit Thinking

Author by : Richard R. Valencia
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 92
Total Download : 463
File Size : 41,6 Mb
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Description : Deficit thinking refers to the notion that students, particularly low income minority students, fail in school because they and their families experience deficiencies that obstruct the leaning process (e.g. limited intelligence, lack of motivation, inadequate home socialization). Tracing the evolution of deficit thinking, the authors debunk the pseudo-science and offer more plausible explanations of why students fail.


Blowout

Author by : Mario T. García
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of North Carolina Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 75
Total Download : 321
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Description : In March 1968, thousands of Chicano students walked out of their East Los Angeles high schools and middle schools to protest decades of inferior and discriminatory education in the so-called "Mexican Schools." During these historic walkouts, or "blowouts," the students were led by Sal Castro, a courageous and charismatic Mexican American teacher who encouraged the students to make their grievances public after school administrators and school board members failed to listen to them. The resulting blowouts sparked the beginning of the urban Chicano Movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, the largest and most widespread civil rights protests by Mexican Americans in U.S. history. This fascinating testimonio, or oral history, transcribed and presented in Castro's voice by historian Mario T. Garcia, is a compelling, highly readable narrative of a young boy growing up in Los Angeles who made history by his leadership in the blowouts and in his career as a dedicated and committed teacher. Blowout! fills a major void in the history of the civil rights and Chicano movements of the 1960s, particularly the struggle for educational justice.


Education For Empire

Author by : Clif Stratton
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 74
Total Download : 312
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Description : "Education for Empire examines how American public schools created and placed children on multiple and uneven paths to "good citizenship." These paths offered varying kinds of subordination and degrees of exclusion closely tied to race, national origin, and US imperial ambitions. Public school administrators, teachers, and textbook authors grappled with how to promote and share in the potential benefits of commercial and territorial expansion, and in both territories and states, how to apply colonial forms of governance to the young populations they professed to prepare for varying future citizenships. The book brings together subjects in American history usually treated separately--in particular the formation and expansion of public schools and empire building both at home and abroad. Temporally framed by the 1882 Chinese Exclusion and 1924 National Origins Acts, two pivotal immigration laws deeply entangled in and telling of US quests for empire, case studies in California, Hawaii, Georgia, New York, the Southwest, and Puerto Rico reveal that marginalized people contested, resisted, and blazed alternative paths to citizenship, in effect destabilizing the boundaries that white nationalists, including many public school officials, in the United States and other self-described "white men's countries" worked so hard to create and maintain"--Provided by publisher.


East Of East

Author by : Romeo Guzmán
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rutgers University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 95
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Description : East of East: The Making of Greater El Monte, is an edited collection of thirty-one essays that trace the experience of a California community over three centuries, from eighteenth-century Spanish colonization to twenty-first century globalization. Employing traditional historical scholarship, oral history, creative nonfiction and original art, the book provides a radical new history of El Monte and South El Monte, showing how interdisciplinary and community-engaged scholarship can break new ground in public history. East of East tells stories that have been excluded from dominant historical narratives—stories that long survived only in the popular memory of residents, as well as narratives that have been almost completely buried and all but forgotten. Its cast of characters includes white vigilantes, Mexican anarchists, Japanese farmers, labor organizers, civil rights pioneers, and punk rockers, as well as the ordinary and unnamed youth who generated a vibrant local culture at dances and dive bars.


Mexican Americans And World War Ii

Author by : Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Texas Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 309
File Size : 48,8 Mb
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Description : A valuable book and the first significant scholarship on Mexican Americans in World War II. Up to 750,000 Mexican American men served in World War II, earning more Medals of Honor and other decorations in proportion to their numbers than any other ethnic group.


La Gente

Author by : Lorena V. Márquez
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 52
Total Download : 195
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Description : La Gente traces the rise of the Chicana/o Movement in Sacramento and the role of everyday people in galvanizing a collective to seek lasting and transformative change during the 1960s and 1970s. In their efforts to be self-determined, la gente contested multiple forms of oppression at school, at work sites, and in their communities. Though diverse in their cultural and generational backgrounds, la gente were constantly negotiating acts of resistance, especially when their lives, the lives of their children, their livelihoods, or their households were at risk. Historian Lorena V. Márquez documents early community interventions to challenge the prevailing notions of desegregation by barrio residents, providing a look at one of the first cases of outright resistance to desegregation efforts by ethnic Mexicans. She also shares the story of workers in the Sacramento area who initiated and won the first legal victory against canneries for discriminating against brown and black workers and women, and demonstrates how the community crossed ethnic barriers when it established the first accredited Chicana/o and Native American community college in the nation. Márquez shows that the Chicana/o Movement was not solely limited to a handful of organizations or charismatic leaders. Rather, it encouraged those that were the most marginalized--the working poor, immigrants and/or the undocumented, and the undereducated--to fight for their rights on the premise that they too were contributing and deserving members of society.


The Struggle In Black And Brown

Author by : Brian D Behnken
Languange : en
Publisher by : U of Nebraska Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 46
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Description : It might seem that African Americans and Mexican Americans would have common cause in matters of civil rights. This volume, which considers relations between blacks and browns during the civil rights era, carefully examines the complex and multifaceted realities that complicate such assumptions—and that revise our view of both the civil rights struggle and black-brown relations in recent history. Unique in its focus, innovative in its methods, and broad in its approach to various locales and time periods, the book provides key perspectives to understanding the development of America’s ethnic and sociopolitical landscape. These essays focus chiefly on the Southwest, where Mexican Americans and African Americans have had a long history of civil rights activism. Among the cases the authors take up are the unification of black and Chicano civil rights and labor groups in California; divisions between Mexican Americans and African Americans generated by the War on Poverty; and cultural connections established by black and Chicano musicians during the period. Together these cases present the first truly nuanced picture of the conflict and cooperation, goodwill and animosity, unity and disunity that played a critical role in the history of both black-brown relations and the battle for civil rights. Their insights are especially timely, as black-brown relations occupy an increasingly important role in the nation’s public life.


White Washing American Education The New Culture Wars In Ethnic Studies 2 Volumes

Author by : Denise M. Sandoval
Languange : en
Publisher by : ABC-CLIO
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 79
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Description : Recent attacks on Ethnic Studies, revisionist actions in curriculum content, and anti-immigrant policies are creating a new culture war in America. This important work lays out the current debates—both in K–12 and higher education—to uncover the dangers and to offer solutions. • Presents an innovative exploration of the new culture wars that address the various debates and views on Ethnic Studies that are under attack in American education, both in grades K–12 and in higher education • Provides information and insights presented by outstanding editors and contributors who are influential in the field • Includes case studies of Ethnic Studies at risk in higher education as well as personal narratives regarding the challenges and struggles of Ethnic Studies scholars and practitioners • Suggests solutions for strengthening diverse curricula in K–12 classrooms and in higher education classrooms


The Arizona Report

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 38
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Description :


Deculturalization And The Struggle For Equality

Author by : Joel Spring
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 49
Total Download : 612
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Description : Joel Spring’s history of school polices imposed on dominated groups in the United States examines the concept of deculturalization—the use of schools to strip away family languages and cultures and replace them with those of the dominant group. The focus is on the education of dominated groups forced to become citizens in territories conquered by the U.S., including Native Americans, Enslaved Africans, Chinese, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Hawaiians. In 7 concise, thought-provoking chapters, this analysis and documentation of how education is used to change or eliminate linguistic and cultural traditions in the U.S. looks at the educational, legal, and social construction of race and racism in the United States, emphasizing the various meanings of "equality" that have existed from colonial America to the present. Providing a broader perspective for understanding the denial of cultural and linguistic rights in the United States, issues of language, culture, and deculturalization are placed in a global context. The major change in the 8th Edition is a new chapter, "Global Corporate Culture and Separate But Equal," describing how current efforts at deculturalization involve replacing family and personal cultures with a corporate culture to increase worker efficiency. Substantive updates and revisions are made throughout all other chapters


Rethinking The History Of American Education

Author by : W. Reese
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 89
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Description : This collection of original essays examines the history of American education as it has developed as a field since the 1970s and moves into a post-revisionist era and looks forward to possible new directions for the future. Contributors take a comprehensive approach, beginning with colonial education and spanning to modern day, while also looking at various aspects of education, from higher education, to curriculum, to the manifestation of social inequality in education. The essays speak to historians, educational researchers, policy makers and others seeking fresh perspectives on questions related to the historical development of schooling in the United States.