Citizens Experts And The Environment

Author by : Frank Fischer
Languange : en
Publisher by : Duke University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 12
Total Download : 551
File Size : 48,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : DIVClaims that the problematic communication gap between experts and ordinary citizens is best remedied by a renewal of local citizen participation in deliberative structures./div


Citizens Experts And The Environment

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 76
Total Download : 562
File Size : 55,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : DIVClaims that the problematic communication gap between experts and ordinary citizens is best remedied by a renewal of local citizen participation in deliberative structures./div


Citizenship Environment Economy

Author by : A. Dobson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 74
Total Download : 929
File Size : 52,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : As governments around the world grapple with the challenge of delivering environmental sustainability, attention has recently focused on the role that citizens should play in meeting the challenge. In advanced industrial countries such as ours, which operate in the political framework of liberal capitalism, what relevance can we place on 'environmental citizenship'? This book looks at the obstacles and opportunities which exist within this context and examines the possibility of ethical investment, the social economy and considers whether there is space in the capitalist economy for environmental citizens to 'do the right thing?' This book is a special issue of the leading journal Environmental Politics.


Children Citizenship And Environment

Author by : Bronwyn Hayward
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 33
Total Download : 493
File Size : 47,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : When it was first published in 2012, Children, Citizenship and Environment correctly predicted a strong surge in youth activism as children are confronted by four difficult and intersecting challenges: dangerous environmental change, weakening democracies, growing social inequality, and a global economy marked by unprecedented youth unemployment and unsustainable resource extraction. Nearly a decade on, global school strikes in response to the threats of chaotic climate change have underscored why youth action is vital and effective. While the experience of a world pandemic may have interrupted the rise of youthful street activism, it has also served to underscore the problems of deepening inequality and the risks of increasingly authoritarian government responses that young citizens must also confront. Against this background the message of this substantially revised edition is as important today as it was when it was first published. Controversial, yet ultimately hopeful, political scientist Bronwyn Hayward rethinks assumptions about youth citizenship in neoliberal democracies. Writing with co-authors, school climate strikers, Indigenous and disability activists, teachers, researchers and community advocates, Hayward develops her ‘SEEDS’ model of ecological citizenship for a school strike generation. The SEEDS of citizenship focus on Social agency, Environmental education, Embedded justice, Decentred deliberation and Self-transcendence. Discussion considers how these SEEDS of citizenship support young citizens’ democratic imagination and develop their ‘handprint’ for social justice. This ground-breaking book will be of interest to a wide audience, in particular teachers and professionals who work in Environmental Citizenship Education, as well as students and community activists with an interest in environmental change, democracy and intergenerational justice.


Scientists Experts And Civic Engagement

Author by : Amy E. Lesen
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 42
Total Download : 943
File Size : 40,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : How do scientists, scholars, and other experts engage with the general public and with the communities affected by their work or residing in their sites of study? Where are the fine lines between public scholarship, civic engagement, and activism? Must academics 'give back' once they collect data and publish results? In this volume, authors from a wide range of disciplines examine these relationships to assess how they can be fruitful or challenging. Describing the methodological and ethical issues that experts must consider when carrying out public scholarship, this book includes a checklist for critical factors of success in engagement and an examination of the role of digital social media in science communication. Illustrated by a range of case studies addressing environmental issues (climate change, resource use, post-disaster policy) and education, it offers an investigation into the levels and ways in which scholars can engage, and how and whether academics and experts who engage in community work and public scholarship are acknowledged and rewarded for doing so by their institutions. Also bringing into the debate the perspective of citizens who have collaborated with academics, the book offers an exploration of the democratizing potential of participatory action research.


Routledge Handbook Of Global Environmental Politics

Author by : Paul G. Harris
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 35
Total Download : 382
File Size : 48,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This handbook provides a comprehensive and authoritative survey of Global Environmental Politics. It brings together leading international academic experts and features 40 chapters that: Describe the history of global environmental politics as a discipline and explain the various theories and perspectives used by scholars and students to understand it. Examine the key actors and institutions in global environmental politics, explaining the role of states, international organizations, regimes, international law, foreign policy institutions, domestic politics, corporations and transnational actors. Address the ideas and themes shaping the practice and study of global environmental politics, including sustainability, consumption, expertise, uncertainty, security, diplomacy, North-South relations, globalisation, justice, ethics, participation and citizenship. Assess the key issues and policies within global environmental politics, including energy, climate change, ozone depletion, air pollution, acid rain, sustainable transport, persistent organic pollutants, hazardous wastes, water, rivers, wetlands, oceans, fisheries, marine mammals, biodiversity, migratory species, natural heritage, forests, desertification, food and agriculture. With an in-depth new preface by the Editor, this edition of the handbook is an invaluable resource for students, scholars, researchers and practitioners of environmental politics, environmental studies, environmental science, geography, international relations and political science.


Pathways For Getting To Better Water Quality The Citizen Effect

Author by : Lois Wright Morton
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer Science & Business Media
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 97
Total Download : 176
File Size : 43,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book is about accomplishing change in how land is managed in agricultural watersheds. Wide-ranging case studies repeatedly document that plans, policies, and regulations are not adequate substitutes for the empowerment of people. Ultimately change on the land is managed and accomplished by the people that live on land within each watershed.


Citizen Environmentalists

Author by : James Longhurst
Languange : en
Publisher by : UPNE
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 11
Total Download : 319
File Size : 43,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : A telling look at the lives and strategies of women environmental activists in the long 1960s, solidly grounded in a national context


Knowledge Policy And Expertise

Author by : Susan Owens
Languange : en
Publisher by : OUP Oxford
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 10
Total Download : 393
File Size : 49,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book presents a fascinating analysis of expertise and policy formation, based on an in-depth study of the UK Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution. The Commission provided expert advice to governments from 1970 to 2011. Often portrayed as a scientific body, it was in fact an interesting hybrid, which embodied wide-ranging expertise. It delivered thirty-three reports, leaving a significant mark on British environmental policy, and having influence within Europe and beyond. Drawing upon an extensive literature and a wide range of sources, Knowledge, Policy, and Expertise provides the only full account of this important advisory body, covering a period in which the policy landscape was profoundly transformed. It offers a rich and detailed analysis of authority, autonomy, and trust; of the diverse roles that advisors can play and the networks within which they operate; and of the circumstances of influence in which expert advice comes to be accepted gratefully, used strategically, absorbed in diffuse ways, or ignored. Above all, this book demonstrates the complexity and contingency of knowledge-policy relations, contributing substantially to a theory of expertise, and drawing out important implications for the future of good advice.


Environmental Leadership

Author by : Deborah Rigling Gallagher
Languange : en
Publisher by : SAGE
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 208
File Size : 48,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This reference handbook tackles issues relevant to leadership in the realm of the environment and sustainability.


Japan S Environmental Politics And Governance

Author by : Yasuo Takao
Languange : en
Publisher by : Taylor & Francis
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 98
Total Download : 598
File Size : 48,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Environmental issues stretch across scales of geographic space and require action at multiple levels of jurisdiction, including the individual level, community level, national level, and global level. Much of the scholarly work surrounding new approaches to environmental governance tends to overlook the role of sub-national governments, but this study examines the potential of sub-national participation to make policy choices which are congruent with global strategies and national mandates. This book investigates the emerging actors and new channels of Japan’s environmental governance which has been taking shape within an increasingly globalized international system. By analysing this important new phenomenon, it sheds light on the changing nature of Japan’s environmental policy and politics, and shows how the links between global strategies, national mandates and local action serve as an influential factor in Japan’s changing structures of environmental governance. Further, it demonstrates that decision-making competencies are shared between actors operating at different levels and in new spheres of authority, resulting from collaboration between state and non-state actors. It highlights a number of the problems, challenges, and critiques of the actors in environmental governance, as well as raising new empirical and theoretical puzzles for the future study of governance over environmental and global issues. Finally, it concludes that changes in the tiers and new spheres of authority are leading the nation towards an environmentally stable future positioned within socio-economic and political constraints. Demonstrating that bridging policy gaps between local action, national policy and global strategies is potentially a way of reinventing environmental policy, this book will be of interest to students and scholars of Environmental Studies, Environmental Politics and Japanese Politics.


Governing Environmental Conflicts In China

Author by : Yanwei Li
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 49
Total Download : 450
File Size : 42,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Environmental conflicts are the source of many large-scale popular protests in China, with some protests substantially endangering social order. Such protests have often prompted severe counter measures by both national and local government, but have often then gone on to result in compromises whereby the demands of protesters have been largely met. This book considers the nature of environmental conflicts in China and the way in which national and local governments have handled the situations. It includes detailed case studies of particular conflicts, relates the governance of environmental conflicts in China to wider discussions on the nature of governance and examines under what conditions government in China makes compromises. The book concludes by assessing the lessons for the future.


Refining Expertise

Author by : Gwen Ottinger
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 62
Total Download : 810
File Size : 55,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : "An intriguing and impressive account of corporate social responsibility—and neoliberalism writ large—on the ground, in action, in chemical plant communities in Louisiana…Ottinger effectively [illustrates] how, in complex, culturally saturated ways, corporate commitment to `responsible care’ has created critical challenges for environmental activism and justice." —Kim Fortun, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Residents of a small Louisiana town were sure that the oil refinery next door was making them sick. As part of a campaign demanding relocation away from the refinery, they collected scientific data to prove it. Their campaign ended with a settlement agreement that addressed many of their grievances—but not concerns about their health. Yet, instead of continuing to collect data, residents began to let refinery scientists’ assertions that their operations did not harm them stand without challenge. What makes a community move so suddenly from actively challenging to apparently accepting experts’ authority? Refining Expertise argues that the answer rests in the way that refinery scientists and engineers defined themselves as experts. Rather than claiming to be infallible, they began to portray themselves as responsible. This work drives home the need for both activists and politically engaged scholars to reconfigure their own activities in response, in order to advance community health and robust scientific knowledge about it. Gwen Ottinger is Assistant Professor in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington-Bothell, where she teaches in the Science, Technology, & Society and Environmental Studies majors. She is co-editor of Technoscience and Environmental Justice: Expert Cultures in a Grassroots Movement.


Nature S Experts

Author by : Stephen Bocking
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rutgers University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 55
Total Download : 641
File Size : 44,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Annotation Explores the contributions and challenges presented when scientific authority enters the realm of environmental affairs. Practical examples and case studies illustrate that science must be relevant, credible, and democratic.


Democracy And Expertise

Author by : Frank Fischer
Languange : en
Publisher by : OUP Oxford
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 18
Total Download : 350
File Size : 42,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book examines the role of policy expertise in a democratic society. From the perspectives of both political theory and policy studies, the chapters explore the implications of deliberative democratic governance for professional expertise and extends them to specific policy practices. Following the lead of John Dewey, the discussion focuses in particular on the ways professional practices might be reoriented to assist citizens in understanding and discussing the complex policy issues of an advanced technological society. In doing so, it also explores how public deliberation can be improved through more cooperative forms of policy inquiry. Adopting a deliberative-analytic approach , policy inquiry is grounded in a postempiricist, constructivist understanding of inquiry and knowledge and the participatory practices that support it. Toward this end, the chapters draw on thriving theoretical and practical work dedicated to revitalizing the citizen's role in both civil society and newer practices of democratic governance, in particular deliberative democracy in political theory, practical work with deliberative experiments, the theory and practices of democratic governance, and participatory research. Deliberative practices are promoted here as a new component part of policy-related disciplines required for participatory governance. Calling for a specialization of "policy epistemics" to advance such practices, the second half of the book takes up issues related to deliberative empowerment, including the relation of technical and social knowledge, the interpretive dimensions of social meaning and multiple realities, the role of narrative knowledge and storylines policy inquiry, social learning, tacit knowledge, the design of discursive spaces, and the place of emotional expression in public deliberation.


Decision Making For The Environment

Author by : National Research Council
Languange : en
Publisher by : National Academies Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 71
Total Download : 784
File Size : 55,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : With the growing number, complexity, and importance of environmental problems come demands to include a full range of intellectual disciplines and scholarly traditions to help define and eventually manage such problems more effectively. Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities is the result of a 2-year effort by 12 social and behavioral scientists, scholars, and practitioners. The report sets research priorities for the social and behavioral sciences as they relate to several different kinds of environmental problems.


Mexican Americans And The Environment

Author by : Devon Gerardo Pe–a
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Arizona Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 51
Total Download : 757
File Size : 44,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Mexican Americans have traditionally had a strong land ethic, believing that humans must respect la tierra because it is the source of la vida. As modern market forces exploit the earth, communities struggle to control their own ecological futures, and several studies have recorded that Mexican Americans are more impacted by environmental injustices than are other national-origin groups. In our countryside, agricultural workers are poisoned by pesticides, while farmers have lost ancestral lands to expropriation. And in our polluted inner cities, toxic wastes sicken children in their very playgrounds and homes. This book addresses the struggle for environmental justice, grassroots democracy, and a sustainable society from a variety of Mexican American perspectives. It draws on the ideas and experiences of people from all walks of lifeÑactivists, farmworkers, union organizers, land managers, educators, and many othersÑwho provide a clear overview of the most critical ecological issues facing Mexican-origin people today. The text is organized to first provide a general introduction to ecology, from both scientific and political perspectives. It then presents an environmental history for Mexican-origin people on both sides of the border, showing that the ecologically sustainable Norte–o land use practices were eroded by the conquest of El Norte by the United States. It finally offers a critique of the principal schools of American environmentalism and introduces the organizations and struggles of Mexican Americans in contemporary ecological politics. Devon Pe–a contrasts tenets of radical environmentalism with the ecological beliefs and grassroots struggles of Mexican-origin people, then shows how contemporary environmental justice struggles in Mexican American communities have challenged dominant concepts of environmentalism. Mexican Americans and the Environment is a didactically sound text that introduces students to the conceptual vocabularies of ecology, culture, history, and politics as it tells how competing ideas about nature have helped shape land use and environmental policies. By demonstrating that any consideration of environmental ethics is incomplete without taking into account the experiences of Mexican Americans, it clearly shows students that ecology is more than nature study but embraces social issues of critical importance to their own lives.


Deliberative Democracy And The Environment

Author by : Graham Smith
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 71
Total Download : 239
File Size : 51,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Contemporary democracies are frequently criticized for failing to respond adequately to environmental problems and our political institutions are often charged with misrepresenting environmental values in decision-making processes. In this innovative volume, Graham Smith argues that the enhancement and institutionalisation of democratic deliberation will improve reflection on the wide range of environmental values that citizens hold. Drawing on theories of deliberative democracy, Smith argues that institutions need to be restructured in order to promote democratic dialogue and reflection on the plurality of environmental values. Deliberative Democracy and the Environment makes an important contribution to our understanding of the relationship between democratic and green political theory. Drawing on evidence from Europe and the United States, it systematically engages with questions of institutional design.


Citizen Science

Author by : Susanne Hecker
Languange : en
Publisher by : UCL Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 47
Total Download : 727
File Size : 51,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Citizen science, the active participation of the public in scientific research projects, is a rapidly expanding field in open science and open innovation. It provides an integrated model of public knowledge production and engagement with science. As a growing worldwide phenomenon, it is invigorated by evolving new technologies that connect people easily and effectively with the scientific community. Catalysed by citizens’ wishes to be actively involved in scientific processes, as a result of recent societal trends, it also offers contributions to the rise in tertiary education. In addition, citizen science provides a valuable tool for citizens to play a more active role in sustainable development. This book identifies and explains the role of citizen science within innovation in science and society, and as a vibrant and productive science-policy interface. The scope of this volume is global, geared towards identifying solutions and lessons to be applied across science, practice and policy. The chapters consider the role of citizen science in the context of the wider agenda of open science and open innovation, and discuss progress towards responsible research and innovation, two of the most critical aspects of science today.


Environmental Discourses In Public And International Law

Author by : Brad Jessup
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 73
Total Download : 716
File Size : 50,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : How do dominant views and arguments about environmental problems traverse and connect international and public law?


The Routledge Handbook Of Democracy And Sustainability

Author by : Basil Bornemann
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 36
Total Download : 419
File Size : 51,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This handbook provides comprehensive and critical coverage of the dynamic and complex relationship between democracy and sustainability in contemporary theory, discourse, and practice. Distinguished scholars from different disciplines, such as political science, sociology, philosophy, international relations, look at the present state of this relationship, asking how it has evolved and where it is likely to go in the future. They examine compatibilities and tensions, continuities and changes, as well as challenges and potentials across theoretical, empirical and practical contexts. This wide-spanning collection brings together multiple established and emerging viewpoints on the debate between democracy and sustainability which have, until now, been fragmented and diffuse. It comprises diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives discussing democracy’s role in, and potential for, coping with environmental issues at the local and global scales. This handbook provides a comprehensive overview of arguments, claims, questions, and insights that are put forward regarding the relationship between democracy and sustainability. In the process, it not only consolidates and condenses, but also broadens and captures the many nuances of the debate. By showing how theoretical, empirical and practical accounts are interrelated, focusing on diverse problem areas and spheres of action, it serves as a knowledge source for professionals who seek to develop action strategies that do justice to both sustainability and democracy, as well as providing a valuable reference for academic researchers, lecturers and students.


Environment And Social Theory

Author by : John Barry
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 76
Total Download : 825
File Size : 42,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Written in an engaging and accessible manner by one of the leading scholars in his field, Environment and Social Theory, completed revised and updated with two new chapters, is an indispensable guide to the way in which the environment and social theory relate to one another. This popular text outlines the complex interlinking of the environment, nature and social theory from ancient and pre-modern thinking to contemporary social theorizing. John Barry: examines the ways major religions such as Judaeo-Christianity have and continue to conceptualize the environment analyzes the way the non-human environment features in Western thinking from Marx and Darwin, to Freud and Horkheimer explores the relationship between gender and the environment, postmodernism and risk society schools of thought, and the contemporary ideology of orthodox economic thinking in social theorising about the environment. How humans value, use and think about the environment, is an increasingly central and important aspect of recent social theory. It has become clear that the present generation is faced with a series of unique environmental dilemmas, largely unprecedented in human history. With summary points, illustrative examples, glossary and further reading sections this invaluable resource will benefit anyone with an interest in environmentalism, politics, sociology, geography, development studies and environmental and ecological economics.


Public Participation In Environmental Assessment And Decision Making

Author by : National Research Council
Languange : en
Publisher by : National Academies Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 78
Total Download : 755
File Size : 55,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Federal agencies have taken steps to include the public in a wide range of environmental decisions. Although some form of public participation is often required by law, agencies usually have broad discretion about the extent of that involvement. Approaches vary widely, from holding public information-gathering meetings to forming advisory groups to actively including citizens in making and implementing decisions. Proponents of public participation argue that those who must live with the outcome of an environmental decision should have some influence on it. Critics maintain that public participation slows decision making and can lower its quality by including people unfamiliar with the science involved. This book concludes that, when done correctly, public participation improves the quality of federal agencies' decisions about the environment. Well-managed public involvement also increases the legitimacy of decisions in the eyes of those affected by them, which makes it more likely that the decisions will be implemented effectively. This book recommends that agencies recognize public participation as valuable to their objectives, not just as a formality required by the law. It details principles and approaches agencies can use to successfully involve the public.


Management Of Health Risks From Environment And Food

Author by : Hajime Sato
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer Science & Business Media
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 78
Total Download : 831
File Size : 40,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book examines the policy and politics of two health risks, which have recently become prominent social issues in many countries. One is the issue of asbestos as an environmental risk to humans, and another is that of bovine spongiform encephalitis (BSE), or mad cow disease as an animal disease, and of its variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) as a human food risk. Employing a set of analytical frameworks in political science, each case study explores how the issues emerged, agendas got set, alternatives were chosen, and policies were implemented. Through the analysis, it is examined how safety and public reassurance were pursued in the countries studied (Japan, the UK, France the USA, and Korea). Exploration of the successes and failures in their efforts discloses the key elements to successful health risk management.


Environmental Risk Communication In China

Author by : Jia Dai
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 65
Total Download : 843
File Size : 55,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The role of media is becoming increasingly important as globalization has developed. Given fast social transformation and technological development in China, the consequent environmental and health risks demand citizens integrate the communication and prevention of such risks as a significant part of their daily life. This book systematically discusses the communication process of typical environmental risk issues, and the complex interaction among multiple actors, including the public, media, experts, non-governmental organizations, and government in contemporary China. From a media-centered perspective, it applies major theories in the field of environmental and risk communication, and uses a variety of empirical research methods to unravel the complicated and unique experience of communication and governance. Combining theoretical reflections with real-life examples of Chinese scenarios, the authors not only encourage a dialogue between Western and Chinese academia but also inspire students and practitioners to apply risk communication theories to solving real-life problems. The book will appeal to students, scholars, and practitioners of risk and environmental communication studies.


Breaking Boundaries

Author by : Kathleen P. Hunt
Languange : en
Publisher by : SUNY Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 44
Total Download : 897
File Size : 42,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Analyzes efforts made by communities and policy makers around the world to push beyond conventional approaches to environmental decision making. Breaking Boundaries analyzes efforts made by communities and policy makers around the world to push beyond conventional approaches to environmental decision making to enhance public acceptance, sustainability, and the impact of those decisions in local contexts. The current political climate has generated uncertainty among citizens, industry interests, scientists, and other stakeholders, but by applying concepts from various perspectives of environmental communication and deliberative democracy, this book offers a series of lessons learned for both public officials and concerned citizens. The contributors offer a broader understanding of how individuals and groups can get involved effectively in environmental decisions through traditional formats as well as alternative approaches ranging from leadership capacity building to social media activity to civic technology.


The Policy Process In International Environmental Governance

Author by : S. Aggarwal-Khan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 69
Total Download : 814
File Size : 53,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book questions the practices in the policy processes of international institutions. It looks at the formal and informal practices that are routinely undertaken as part of the structure of international policy processes, and analyses how people behave and with what outcome for international environmental governance.


Conceptualizing Environmental Justice

Author by : Damayanti Banerjee
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lexington Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 46
Total Download : 493
File Size : 49,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book explores an environmental justice movement in a rural Kentucky community in the United States. It proposes a plural framework to examine how justice strategies and tools are adopted in environmental movements and calls for a careful reexamination and expanding of environmental justice theory.


Sustainable Communities And The Challenge Of Environmental Justice

Author by : Julian Agyeman
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 56
Total Download : 341
File Size : 52,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Julian Agyeman once again pushes us all to think more critically about how to integrate two important political and intellectual projects.


Democratic Professionalism

Author by : Albert W. Dzur
Languange : en
Publisher by : Penn State Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 90
Total Download : 636
File Size : 48,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Bringing expert knowledge to bear in an open and deliberative way to help solve pressing social problems is a major concern today, when technocratic and bureaucratic decision making often occurs with little or no input from the general public. Albert Dzur proposes an approach he calls &“democratic professionalism&” to build bridges between specialists in domains like law, medicine, and journalism and the lay public in such a way as to enable and enhance broader public engagement with and deliberation about major social issues. Sparking a critical and constructive dialogue among social theories of the professions, professional ethics, and political theories of deliberative democracy, Dzur reveals interests, motivations, strengths, and vulnerabilities in conventional professional roles that provide guideposts for this new approach. He then applies it in examining three practical arenas in which experiments in collaboration and power-sharing between professionals and citizens have been undertaken: public journalism, restorative justice, and the bioethics movement. Finally, he draws lessons from these cases to refine this innovative theory and identify the kinds of challenges practitioners face in being both democratic and professional.