Cultures Of Citizenship In Post War Canada 1940 1955

Author by : Nancy Christie
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Description : The years between the end of World War II and the mid-1960s have usually been viewed as an era of political and social consensus made possible by widely diffused prosperity, creeping Americanization and fears of radical subversion, and a dominant culture challenged periodically by the claims of marginal groups. By exploring what were actually the mainstream ideologies and cultural practices of the period, the authors argue that the postwar consensus was itself a precarious cultural ideal that was characterized by internal tensions and, while containing elements of conservatism, reflected considerable diversity in the way in which citizenship identities were defined. Contributors include Denyse Baillargeon (Université de Montréal), P.E. Bryden (Mount Allison University), Nancy Christie, Michael Gauvreau, Karine Hebert (Carleton University), Len Kuffert (Carleton University), and Peter S. McInnis (St Francis Xavier University).


Creating Postwar Canada

Author by : Robert Rutherdale
Languange : en
Publisher by : UBC Press
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Total Read : 94
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Description : Creating Postwar Canada showcases new research on this complex period, exploring postwar Canada's diverse symbols and battlegrounds. Contributors to the first half of the collection consider evolving definitions of the nation, examining the ways in which Canada was reimagined to include both the Canadian North and landscapes structured by trade and commerce. The essays in the latter half analyze debates on shopping hours, professional striptease, the "provider" role of fathers, interracial adoption, sexuality on campus, and illegal drug use, issues that shaped how the country defined itself in sociocultural and political terms. This collection contributes to the historiography of nationalism, gender and the family, consumer cultures, and countercultures.


Cold War Comforts

Author by : Tarah Brookfield
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
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Total Read : 84
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Description : Cold War Comforts examines Canadian women’s efforts to protect children’s health and safety between the dropping of the first atomic bomb in Hiroshima in 1945 and the end of the Vietnam War in 1975. Amid this global insecurity, many women participated in civil defence or joined the disarmament movement as means to protect their families from the consequences of nuclear war. To help children affected by conflicts in Europe and Asia, women also organized foreign relief and international adoptions. In Canada, women pursued different paths to peace and security. From all walks of life, and from all parts of the country, they dedicated themselves to finding ways to survive the hottest periods of the Cold War. What united these women was their shared concern for children’s survival amid Cold War fears and dangers. Acting on their identities as Canadian citizens and mothers, they characterized with their activism the genuine interest many women had in protecting children’s health and safety. In addition, their activities offered them a legitimate space to operate in the traditionally male realms of defence and diplomacy. Their efforts had a direct impact on the lives of children in Canada and abroad and influenced changes in Canada’s education curriculum, immigration laws, welfare practices, defence policy, and international relations. Cold War Comforts offers insight into how women employed maternalism, nationalism, and internationalism in their work, and examines shifting constructions of family and gender in Cold War Canada. It will appeal to scholars of history, child and family studies, and social policy.


Mapping The Margins

Author by : Nancy Christie
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 55
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Description : Contributors include Denyse Baillargeon (Université de Montréal), Bettina Bradbury (York University), Josette Brun (Université Laval), Nancy Christie (Hamilton), Gwendolyn Davies (University of New Brunswick), Michael Gauvreau (McMaster University), Peter Gossage (Université de Sherbrooke), Ollivier Hubert (Université de Montréal), Jack Little (Simon Fraser University), James Moran (University of Prince Edward Island), Suzanne Morton (McGill University), Matt Savelli (McMaster University), Michele Stairs (York University), James Struthers (Trent University), and David Wright (McMaster University).


Camelot And Canada

Author by : Asa McKercher
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
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Total Read : 71
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Description : A look at the relationship between Canada and the United States during the Kennedy administration of the early 1960s.


With Friends Like These

Author by : David Meren
Languange : en
Publisher by : UBC Press
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Total Read : 63
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Description : One of the most enduring images of Quebec's Quiet Revolution is of Charles de Gaulle proclaiming "Vive le Qu�bec libre!" from the balcony of Montreal City Hall. The incident laid bare Canada's unity crisis and has since dominated interpretations of the Canada-Quebec-France triangle. David Meren demystifies this cri du balcon by looking beyond de Gaulle to Quebec's evolving relationship with France after the Second World War and the clash of nationalisms that resulted. By seeking to understand Quebec, Gaullist, and Canadian nationalism, Meren not only casts doubt on established interpretations of events, he also reveals how the challenge of responding to American superpower and influence shaped the triangle.


Picturing The Family

Author by : Silke Arnold-de Simine
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Total Read : 74
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Description : Whether pasted into an album, framed or shared on social media, the family photograph simultaneously offers a private and public insight into the identity and past of its subject. Long considered a model for understanding individual identity, the idea of the family has increasingly formed the basis for exploring collective pasts and cultural memory. Picturing the Family investigates how visual representations of the family reveal both personal and shared histories, evaluating the testimonial and social value of photography and film.Combining academic and creative, practice-based approaches, this collection of essays introduces a dialogue between scholars and artists working at the intersection between family, memory and visual media. Many of the authors are both researchers and practitioners, whose chapters engage with their own work and that of others, informed by critical frameworks. From the act of revisiting old, personal photographs to the sale of family albums through internet auction, the twelve chapters each present a different collection of photographs or artwork as case studies for understanding how these visual representations of the family perform memory and identity. Building on extensive research into family photographs and memory, the book considers the implications of new cultural forms for how the family is perceived and how we relate to the past. While focusing on the forms of visual representation, above all photographs, the authors also reflect on the contextualization and ‘remediation’ of photography in albums, films, museums and online.


Catholic Origins Of Quebec S Quiet Revolution 1931 1970

Author by : Michael Gauvreau
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 62
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Description : The Catholic Origins of Quebec's Quiet Revolution challenges a versionof history central to modern Quebec's understanding of itself: that theQuiet Revolution began in the 1960s as a secular vision of state andsociety which rapidly displaced an obsolete, clericalized Catholicism.Michael Gauvreau argues that organizations such as Catholic youthmovements played a central role in formulating the Personalist Catholicideology that underlay the Quiet Revolution and that ordinaryQuebecers experienced the Quiet Revolution primarily through a seriesof transformations in the expression of their Catholic identity. In sodoing Gauvreau offers a new understanding of Catholicism's place intwentieth-century Quebec.


Thinkers And Dreamers

Author by : Gerald Friesen
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
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Total Read : 20
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Description : Thinkers and Dreamers honours Carl C. Berger, professor of Canadian history at the University of Toronto for more than forty years and author of influential works on Canadian intellectual history. In this collection, Professor Berger's colleagues and former students explore the currents of intellectual life in North America since the mid-nineteenth century. Broad in scope, the essays range in content from a commentary on works in intellectual history to analyses of the development of particular disciplines and distinctive cultural institutions. Several of the contributions provide sharp critiques of historical thought, including a discussion of professional scholarship and an analysis of the field of intellectual history. Others address issues that combine institutional and cultural history, such as an examination of Victorian Canada and a discussion of immigration and citizenship. These varied reflections aptly convey Berger's contributions to the study of Canadian history.


The Fate Of Labour Socialism

Author by : James Naylor
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
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Total Read : 13
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Description : Almost a century before the New Democratic Party rode the first "orange wave," their predecessors imagined a movement that could rally Canadians against economic insecurity, win access to necessary services such as health care, and confront the threat of war. The party they built during the Great Depression, the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), permanently transformed the country's politics. Past histories have described the CCF as social democrats guided by middle-class intellectuals, a party which shied away from labour radicalism and communist agitation. James Naylor's assiduous research tells a very different story: a CCF created by working-class activists steeped in Marxist ideology who sought to create a movement that would be both loyal to its socialist principles and appealing to the wider electorate. The Fate of Labour Socialism is a fundamental reexamination of the CCF and Canadian working-class politics in the 1930s, one that will help historians better understand Canada's political, intellectual, and labour history.


Radical Housewives

Author by : Julie Guard
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
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Total Read : 59
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Description : Radical Housewives is a history of the Canada's Housewives Consumers Association. Julie Guard reinterprets the view of postwar Canada as economically prosperous and reveals the left's role in the origins of the food security movement.


Labour Goes To War

Author by : Wendy Cuthbertson
Languange : en
Publisher by : UBC Press
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Total Read : 79
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Description : During the Second World War, the Congress of Industrial Organizations in Canada grew from a handful of members to more than a quarter-million. What was it about the "good war" that brought about this phenomenal growth? Labour Goes to War argues that both economic and cultural forces were at work. Labour shortages gave workers greater economic power in the workplace. But cultural factors � workers' patriotism, ties to those on active service, and allegiance to the "people's war" � also fueled the CIO's growth. The complex, often contradictory, motives of workers during this period left the Canadian labour movement with an ambivalent progressive/conservative legacy.


The Hand Of God

Author by : Michael Gauvreau
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 10
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Description : Set against a background of intense religious and cultural change and tensions over the meanings of nationalism and federalism in both Quebec and Canada, Michael Gauvreau's The Hand of God traces the emergence of Claude Ryan as a public intellectual. This is the first comprehensive biography of Ryan based on his personal papers and extensive writings as a social commentator, editorialist, and director of the newspaper Le Devoir. At a time of Catholic religious fervour and new currents of social analysis, Ryan spoke for a postwar generation of young Quebecers, assuring his surprising ascension as one of the most influential voices in Canadian liberalism and federalism in the 1960s. In rich detail, Gauvreau describes Ryan’s ideas on religion, politics, and society, which assured his importance both as a major figure seeking the transformation of Roman Catholicism in the 1950s and 1960s and as an advocate of a type of liberalism that was often at odds with Pierre Elliott Trudeau's. He presents compelling new material on the breakdown of social and cultural consensus, a detailed analysis of Ryan’s personal and intellectual dealings with both Trudeau and René Lévesque, and a strikingly new interpretation of the motives of the key players in the October Crisis of 1970. A significant rethinking of the relationship between liberalism, nationalism, and federalism in Quebec in the twentieth century, The Hand of God uses biography as a lens to explore and shed new light on questions central to postwar Quebec and Canadian cultural, political, and intellectual history.


Tending The Student Body

Author by : Catherine Gidney
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
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Total Read : 41
Total Download : 667
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Description : Tending the Student Body examines the development of health programs at Canadian universities and the transformation of their goals over the first half of the twentieth century from fostering moral character to promoting individualism, self-realization, and mental health.


Secularisation In The Christian World

Author by : Michael Snape
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Total Read : 52
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Description : The power of modernity to secularise has been a foundational idea of the western world. Both social science and church history understood that the Christian religion from 1750 was deeply vulnerable to industrial urbanisation and the Enlightenment. But as evidence mounts that countries of the European world experienced secularising forces in different ways at different periods, the timing and causes of de-Christianisation are now widely seen as far from straightforward. Secularisation in the Christian World brings together leading scholars in the social history of religion and the sociology of religion to explore what we know about the decline of organised Christianity in Britain, Europe, the United States, Canada and Australia. The chapters tackle different strands, themes, comparisons and territories to demonstrate the diversity of approach, thinking and evidence that has emerged in the last 30 years of scholarship into the religious past and present. The volume includes both new research and essays of theoretical reflection by the most eminent academics. It highlights historians and sociologists in both agreement and dispute. With contributors from eight countries, the volume also brings together many nations for the first consolidated international consideration of recent themes in de-Christianisation. With church historians and cultural historians, and religious sociologists and sociologists of the godless society, this book provides a state-of-the-art guide to secularisation studies.


Not Quite Us

Author by : Kevin P. Anderson
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 64
Total Download : 256
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Description : In twentieth-century Canada, mainline Protestants, fundamentalists, liberal nationalists, monarchists, conservative Anglophiles, and left-wing intellectuals had one thing in common: they all subscribed to a centuries-old world view that Catholicism was an authoritarian, regressive, untrustworthy, and foreign force that did not fit into a democratic, British nation like Canada. Analyzing the connections between anti-Catholicism and national identity in English Canada, Not Quite Us examines the consistency of anti-Catholic tropes in the public and private discourses of intellectuals, politicians, and clergymen, such as Arthur Lower, Eugene Forsey, Harold Innis, C.E. Silcox, F.R. Scott, George Drew, and Emily Murphy, along with those of private Canadians. Challenging the misconception that an allegedly secular, civic, and more tolerant nationalism that emerged excised its Protestant and British cast, Kevin Anderson determines that this nationalist narrative was itself steeped in an exclusionary Anglo-Protestant understanding of history and values. He shows that over time, as these ideas were dispersed through editorials, cartoons, correspondence, literature, and lectures, they influenced Canadians' intimate perceptions of themselves and their connection to Britain, the ethno-religious composition of the nation, the place of religion in public life, and national unity. Anti-Catholicism helped shape what it means to be "Canadian" in the twentieth century. Not Quite Us documents how equating Protestantism with democracy and individualism permeated ideas of national identity and continues to define Canada into the twenty-first century.


Abuse Or Punishment

Author by : Marie-Aimée Cliche
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 63
Total Download : 930
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Description : At one time, the use of corporal punishment by parents in child-rearing was considered normal, but in the second half of the nineteenth century this begin to change, in Quebec as well as the rest of the Western world. It was during this period that the extent of ill-treatment inflicted on children—treatment once excused as good child-rearing practice—was discovered. This book analyzes both the advice provided to parents and the different forms of child abuse within families. Cliche derives her information from family magazines, reports and advice columns in newspapers, people’s life stories, the records of the Montreal Juvenile Court, and even comic strips. Two dates are given particular focus: 1920, with the trial of the parents of Aurore Gagnon, which sensitized the public to the phenomenon of “child martyrs;” and 1940, with the advent of the New Education movement, which was based on psychology rather than strict discipline and religious doctrine. There has always been child abuse. What has changed is society’s sensitivity to it. That is why defenders of children’s rights call for the repeal of Section 43 of the Canadian Criminal Code, which authorizes “reasonable” corporal punishment. Abuse or Punishment? considers not only the history of violence towards children in Quebec but the history of public perception of this violence and what it means for the rest of Canada.


Managing The Canadian Mosaic In Wartime

Author by : Ivana Caccia
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 76
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Description : An account of the Canadian government's attempts to "Canadianize" immigrants during the Second World War.


Babies For The Nation

Author by : Denyse Baillargeon
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 38
Total Download : 773
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Description : Described by some as a “necropolis for babies,” the province of Quebec in the early twentieth century recorded infant mortality rates, particularly among French-speaking Catholics, that were among the highest in the Western world. This “bleeding of the nation” gave birth to a vast movement for child welfare that paved the way for a medicalization of childbearing. In Babies for the Nation, basing her analysis on extensive documentary research and more than fifty interviews with mothers, Denyse Baillargeon sets out to understand how doctors were able to convince women to consult them, and why mothers chose to follow their advice. Her analysis considers the medical discourse of the time, the development of free services made available to mothers between 1910 and 1970, and how mothers used these services. Showing the variety of social actors involved in this process (doctors, nurses, women’s groups, members of the clergy, private enterprise, the state, and the mothers themselves), this study delineates the alliances and the conflicts that arose between them in a complex phenomenon that profoundly changed the nature of childbearing in Quebec. Un Québec en mal d’enfants: La médicalisation de la maternité 1910—1970 was awarded the Clio-Québec Prize, the Lionel Groulx-Yves-Saint-Germain Prize, and the Jean-Charles-Falardeau Prize. This translation by W. Donald Wilson brings this important book to a new readership.


The Sixties

Author by : Dimitry Anastakis
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 17
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Description : For those who did not live through the experience of the Sixties, it is often difficult to comprehend this tumultuous period. Even those who lived though the era and have studied the Sixties have wrestled with its deeper meaning. While the Sixties ultimate "meaning" remains elusive, there can be no doubt that the period's transformative effect upon Canadians - culturally, politically, and economically - was immense. From arts and architecture to politics and protest, the decade has attained near-mythical status, leaving an undeniable influence on virtually every aspect of Canadian life. The images, sounds, and tastes of the decade remain an indelible part of our own twenty-first-century experience, yet for a decade that remains so well defined within the public memory, the Sixties left behind an ambiguous historic legacy for those who study the period. Taking a multidisciplinary approach that includes history, architecture, art, political science and journalism, this volume provides fresh new perspectives on Canada's loudest, liveliest, and most debated period. Four decades after Canada's own Expo 67 "summer of love", this timely book explores issues from dope, de Gaulle, and driver education, to Trudeau, Vietnam, and Africville, all thought the colourful kaleidoscope of the Sixties..


Democracy S Angels

Author by : Kristina R. Llewellyn
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 31
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Description : Following the Second World War, women teachers filled a labour shortage in schools and Canadian newspapers rushed to feature their presence. One caption even called the teachers "pretty enough to send dad to school with junior." Envisioned as shining examples of "proper" femininity, female educators were expected to produce a new generation of housewives for a strong democratic nation. Democracy's Angels is a daring exploration of the limitations of that vision, which ultimately confined women to teaching a model of citizenship that privileged masculinity and reduced women's authority. In an analytical tour-de-force, Kristina Llewellyn unravels the ideological underpinnings of democracy as the objective for postwar education. Schools were charged with producing rational, autonomous, politically engaged citizens, but women were not associated with these qualities. Claims to scholarly knowledge, professional autonomy, and administrative positions were reserved for male teachers. Using rigorous interdisciplinary scholarship and extensive interviews with former teachers, Llewellyn reveals the ways in which women negotiated and even found opportunities within these troubling limitations. An unflinching look at the difficult realities of women's work experiences in postwar Canada, Democracy's Angels illustrates the intrinsic connections between gender, education, and democracy.


Sisters Or Strangers

Author by : Marlene Epp
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
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Total Read : 73
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Description : Spanning more than two hundred years of history, from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first, Sisters or Strangers? explores the complex lives of immigrant, ethnic, and racialized women in Canada. Among the themes examined in this new edition are the intersection of race, crime, and justice, the creation of white settler societies, letters and oral histories, domestic labour, the body, political activism, food studies, gender and ethnic identity, and trauma, violence, and memory. The second edition of this influential essay collection expands its chronological and conceptual scope with fifteen new essays that reflect the latest cutting-edge research in Canadian women's history. Introductions to each thematic section include discussion questions and suggestions for further reading, making the book an even more valuable classroom resource than before.


Planning Toronto

Author by : Richard White
Languange : en
Publisher by : UBC Press
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Total Read : 45
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Description : In this lavishly illustrated, meticulously researched book, Richard White analyzes the city's planning and how it contributed to Toronto becoming a functional, world-class city. Focusing on the critical period from 1940 to 1980, he examines how planners sought to shape the city and the region amid a maelstrom of local and international influences and obstacles. Planning Toronto offers the first comprehensive explanation of how Toronto's postwar plans -- city, metropolitan, and regional -- came to be, who devised them, and what impact they had. As this definitive history reveals, planning matters -- though perhaps not always as expected.


The Sixties And Beyond

Author by : Nancy Christie
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 42
Total Download : 352
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Description : In the decades following the Second World War, North America and Western Europe experienced widespread secularization and dechristianization; many scholars have pinpointed the 1960s as a pivotally important period in this decline. The Sixties and Beyond examines the scope and significance of dechristianization in the western world between 1945 and 2000. A thematically wide-ranging and interdisciplinary collection, The Sixties and Beyond uses a framework that compares the social and cultural experiences of North America and Western Europe during this period. The internationally based contributors examine the dynamic place of Christianity in both private lives and public discourses and practices by assessing issues such as gender relations, family life, religious education, the changing relationship of church and state, and the internal dynamics of religious organizations. The Sixties and Beyond is an excellent contribution to the burgeoning scholarship on the 1960s as well as to the history of Christianity in the western world.


The Politics Of Evangelical Identity

Author by : Lydia Bean
Languange : en
Publisher by : Princeton University Press
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Total Read : 61
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Description : A comparative look at evangelical churches across the U.S.-Canada border that reveals deep political differences It is now a common refrain among liberals that Christian Right pastors and television pundits have hijacked evangelical Christianity for partisan gain. The Politics of Evangelical Identity challenges this notion, arguing that the hijacking metaphor paints a fundamentally distorted picture of how evangelical churches have become politicized. The book reveals how the powerful coalition between evangelicals and the Republican Party is not merely a creation of political elites who have framed conservative issues in religious language, but is anchored in the lives of local congregations. Drawing on her groundbreaking research at evangelical churches near the U.S. border with Canada—two in Buffalo, New York, and two in Hamilton, Ontario—Lydia Bean compares how American and Canadian evangelicals talk about politics in congregational settings. While Canadian evangelicals share the same theology and conservative moral attitudes as their American counterparts, their politics are quite different. On the U.S. side of the border, political conservatism is woven into the very fabric of everyday religious practice. Bean shows how subtle partisan cues emerge in small group interactions as members define how "we Christians" should relate to others in the broader civic arena, while liberals are cast in the role of adversaries. She explains how the most explicit partisan cues come not from clergy but rather from lay opinion leaders who help their less politically engaged peers to link evangelical identity to conservative politics. The Politics of Evangelical Identity demonstrates how deep the ties remain between political conservatism and evangelical Christianity in America.


Making Medicare

Author by : Gregory Marchildon
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 55
Total Download : 565
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Description : This collection fills a serious gap in the existing literature by providing a comprehensive policy history of Medicare in Canada.


Places To Grow

Author by : Lorne Bruce
Languange : en
Publisher by : Libraries Today
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 66
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Description : The core of the book revolves around the shifting nature of Ontario’s political landscape. In many ways this is a story of successive governments, ambitious politicians, diligent bureaucrats, and endless library reports straddling the decades. Their aim appears to have been making even better a system that, despite weaknesses, was clearly the best in Canada. Three distinctive trends emerged in Ontario librarianship after the 1930s: first, a growing sense of professionalism in librarianship; second, an enhanced sense of belonging to a pan-Canadian library movement that in 1946 would result in the formation of the Canadian Library Association; and third, a heightened awareness of the competing demands of high culture and popular culture. Public libraries became an important vehicle for promoting community, albeit with competing visions of “space and place,” as Canada generally and Ontario specifically experienced post-World War II immigration and the baby boom. As libraries approached the 21st century, the concerns of digital formats and the all-encompassing Internet intertwined to alter the book-centric "bricks and mortar" world of libraries. Nonetheless, public libraries were well placed to survive this new threat, just as they had with the challenges of radio, television, and telecommunication challenges in the 20th century.


Debating Dissent

Author by : Lara A. Campbell
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 11
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Description : Although the 1960s are overwhelmingly associated with student radicalism and the New Left, most Canadians witnessed the decade’s political, economic, and cultural turmoil from a different perspective. Debating Dissent dispels the myths and stereotypes associated with the 1960s by examining what this era’s transformations meant to diverse groups of Canadians – and not only protestors, youth, or the white middle-class. With critical contributions from new and senior scholars, Debating Dissent integrates traditional conceptions of the 1960s as a ‘time apart’ within the broader framework of the ‘long-sixties’ and post-1945 Canada, and places Canada within a local, national, an international context. Cutting-edge essays in social, intellectual, and political history reflect a range of historical interpretation and explore such diverse topics as narcotics, the environment, education, workers, Aboriginal and Black activism, nationalism, Quebec, women, and bilingualism. Touching on the decade’s biggest issues, from changing cultural norms to the role of the state, Debating Dissent critically examines ideas of generational change and the sixties.


Nationalism And Social Policy

Author by : Daniel Béland
Languange : en
Publisher by : OUP Oxford
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 58
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Description : Despite the recent proliferation of literature on nationalism and on social policy, relatively little has been written to analyse the possible interaction between the two. Scholars interested in social citizenship have indirectly dealt with the interaction between national identity and social programs such as the British NHS, but they have seldom examined this connection in reference to nationalism. Specialists of nationalism rarely mention social policy, focusing instead on language, culture, ethnicity, and religion. The main objective of this book is to explore the nature of the connection between nationalism and social policy from a comparative and historical perspective. At the theoretical level, this analysis will shed new light on a more general issue: the relationships between identity formation, territorial politics, and social policy. Although this book refers to the experience of many different countries, the main cases are three multinational states, that is, states featuring strong nationalist movements: Canada (Québec), the United Kingdom (Scotland), and Belgium (Flanders). The book looks at the interplay between nationalism and social policy at both the state and sub-state levels through a detailed comparison between these three cases. In its concluding chapter, the book brings in cases of mono-national states (i.e. France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States) to provide broader comparative insight on the meshing of nationalism and social policy. The original theoretical framework for this research is built using insight from selected scholarship on nationalism and on the welfare state.


Research And Reform

Author by : Richard A. Rempel
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 27
Total Download : 160
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Description : The first biologist to establish the study of genetics in a Canadian university, W.P. Thompson was a passionate advocate of science education whose impact extended far beyond his home province of Saskatchewan. In Research and Reform, Richard Rempel brings to light the life, times, and legacy of a brilliant and influential geneticist. Born and raised in rural Ontario, Thompson's thirst for knowledge took him from a largely self-educated youth to undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Toronto and Harvard, respectively, culminating in a successful career in the field of cytogenetics. The discoveries Thompson made working with wheat chromosomes spread across the country and brought him considerable renown within the scientific community. Research and Reform documents Thompson's revolutionary attempts to create a wheat hybrid resistant to fungal leaf rust - efforts supported by the Winnipeg Rust Laboratory, the National Research Council, and the Federal Department of Agriculture. Rempel also documents the sweeping curriculum reforms Thompson introduced to the University of Saskatchewan, first as dean of arts and sciences and later as president. Thompson's presidency demonstrated for the first time the depth of the constructive and cordial relationship that existed between Tommy Douglas's Cooperative Commonwealth Federation government and the university. Shedding light on Thompson's later years, Rempel describes how he became a key figure in the planning and establishment of Saskatchewan's 1962 Medicare legislation. An invaluable addition to the history of science and medicine in Canada, Research and Reform restores a Canadian scientist and educator to his rightful place in history.