Deep Time And The Texas High Plains

Author by : Paul H. Carlson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Texas Tech University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 16
Total Download : 880
File Size : 41,8 Mb
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Description : "Surveys the history and geologic past of the Texas High Plains and upper Brazos River region by focusing on human activity and adaptation and on shifting environmental conditions and animal resources on the Llano Estacado and in Yellow House Draw, the site of the current Lubbock Lake Landmark"--Provided by publisher.


Texas

Author by : A. Ray Stephens
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 293
File Size : 52,7 Mb
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Description : For twenty years the Historical Atlas of Texas stood as a trusted resource for students and aficionados of the state. Now this key reference has been thoroughly updated and expanded—and even rechristened. Texas: A Historical Atlas more accurately reflects the Lone Star State at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Its 86 entries feature 175 newly designed maps—more than twice the number in the original volume—illustrating the most significant aspects of the state’s history, geography, and current affairs. The heart of the book is its wealth of historical information. Sections devoted to indigenous peoples of Texas and its exploration and settlement offer more than 45 entries with visual depictions of everything from the routes of Spanish explorers to empresario grants to cattle trails. In another 31 articles, coverage of modern and contemporary Texas takes in hurricanes and highways, power plants and population trends. Practically everything about this atlas is new. All of the essays have been updated to reflect recent scholarship, while more than 30 appear for the first time, addressing such subjects as the Texas Declaration of Independence, early roads, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Texas-Oklahoma boundary disputes, and the tideland oil controversy. A dozen new entries for “Contemporary Texas” alone chart aspects of industry, agriculture, and minority demographics. Nearly all of the expanded essays are accompanied by multiple maps—everyone in full color. The most comprehensive, state-of-the-art work of its kind, Texas: A Historical Atlas is more than just a reference. It is a striking visual introduction to the Lone Star State.


The Texas Panhandle Frontier

Author by : Frederick W. Rathjen
Languange : en
Publisher by : Texas Tech University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 94
Total Download : 443
File Size : 45,8 Mb
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Description : "An outstanding contribution to the historiography of the American West and likely will remain for a long time the definitive work on the Texas Panhandle."—Ernest Wallace"As one born in the region, Rathjen is sympathetic to it, but he is also understanding of it; there is little Chamber of Commerce stuff in his story." —Robert G. AthearnThe Texas Panhandle—its eastern edge descending sharply from the plains into the canyons of Palo Duro, Tule, Quitaque, Casa Blanca, and Yellow House—is as rich in history as it is in natural beauty. Long considered a crossroads of ancient civilizations, the twenty-six northernmost Texas counties lie on the southern reaches of the Great Plains, where numerous dry creek beds and the Canadian River have carved the region appropriately named the High Plains.Through these plains and their canyons, ancient peoples trailed game for the hunt. The Panhandle provided choice grazing lands for bison, and as the region became more familiar to ancient tribes, semipermanent camps marked the landscape. Yet when Coronado's conquistadores crossed the High Plains in search of fabled wealth and found sun-baked adobe instead of gold, they declared the region a wasteland. Likewise, the Republic of Texas found little use for their vast plains land—considering settlement of the frontier far too dangerous. Not until the late-nineteenth century, as the U.S. Army waged war on the Comanches, Kiowas, and Cheyennes who lived there, did Panhandle tracts of frontier open to hard-bitten settlers who had to prove themselves as indomitable as they were land hungry.Departing from the premise that the Panhandle frontier "is but a brush stroke on . . . [the] much larger canvas" of previous frontier histories, Rathjen challenges the work of Frederick Jackson Turner and Walter Prescott Webb, and proves that regional is by no means synonymous with provincial.


The Grasslands Of The United States

Author by : James Earl Sherow
Languange : en
Publisher by : ABC-CLIO
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 11
Total Download : 683
File Size : 50,8 Mb
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Description : This unique survey of the environmental history of the grasslands in the United States explores the ecological, social, and economic networks enmeshing humans in this biome over the last 10,000 years. * 44 pages of original documents such as the Homestead Act (1862) and the Taylor Grazing Act (1934), Yellow Wolf's concerns with the disappearance of bison (1847), testimony of Kiowas as they sought to protect their reservation, to excerpts from Ron Arnold, one of the main advocates of the Wise Use Movement * Each chapter and case study comes complete with corresponding illustrations, maps, charts, or tables


West Texas

Author by : Paul H. Carlson
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 62
Total Download : 785
File Size : 45,8 Mb
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Description : Texas is as well known for its diversity of landscape and culture as it is for its enormity. But West Texas, despite being popularized in film and song, has largely been ignored by historians as a distinct and cultural geographic space. In West Texas: A History of the Giant Side of the State, Paul H. Carlson and Bruce A. Glasrud rectify that oversight. This volume assembles a diverse set of essays covering the grand sweep of West Texas history from the ancient to the contemporary. In four parts—comprehending the place, people, politics and economic life, and society and culture—Carlson and Glasrud and their contributors survey the confluence of life and landscape shaping the West Texas of today. Early chapters define the region. The “giant side of Texas” is a nineteenth-century geographical description of a vast area that includes the Panhandle, Llano Estacado, Permian Basin, and Big Bend–Trans-Pecos country. It is an arid, windblown environment that connects intimately with the history of Texas culture. Carlson and Glasrud take a nonlinear approach to exploring the many cultural influences on West Texas, including the Tejanos, the oil and gas economy, and the major cities. Readers can sample topics in whichever order they please, whether they are interested in learning about ranching, recreation, or turn-of-the-century education. Throughout, familiar western themes arise: the urban growth of El Paso is contrasted with the mid-century decline of small towns and the social shifting that followed. Well-known Texas scholars explore popular perceptions of West Texas as sparsely populated and rife with social contradiction and rugged individualism. West Texas comes into yet clearer view through essays on West Texas women, poets, Native peoples, and musicians. Gathered here is a long overdue consideration of the landscape, culture, and everyday lives of one of America’s most iconic and understudied regions.


The Story Of Palo Duro Canyon

Author by : Duane F. Guy
Languange : en
Publisher by : Texas Tech University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 75
Total Download : 900
File Size : 54,5 Mb
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Description : Of the canyons that break the eastern edge of the Staked Plains, Palo Duro is by far the most spectacular. As one approaches the edge, the earth opens up into a vast gash, a geological and ecological wonder. And whether you come to Palo Duro as a novice or veteran canyoneer, the thrill and the mystery are always intense. How did the canyon get here? What caused the vari-color of the walls and formations? Why do some formations stand completely separated from the canyon walls? Did the little stream running along the canyon floor form this canyon all by itself? Who were the first people to find this canyon and how did they react? On this last question imagination goes to work and contemplates what ancient people must have felt when they, even less aware than we, stumbled upon the chasm rim and quickly realized that they had found a bonanza, an immense concentration of water, wood, game, and protection—all they needed to sustain life.—Frederick W. Rathjen Originally published as an edition of the Panhandle Plains Historical Review, The Story of Palo Duro Canyon , with its seven essays devoted to geology, archeology, paleontology, vegetation, park development, and the amphitheater, and its road log from Canyon, Texas, through the Palo Duro State Park, has become a classic. This Double Mountain Books edition, with a new introduction by Frederick W. Rathjen, makes available once again a comprehensive discovery and invaluable memento for the many thousands who visit the park each year.


Time Machines

Author by : Peter D. Ward
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer Science & Business Media
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 41
Total Download : 289
File Size : 48,7 Mb
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Description : From patterns in rock, scraps of fossilized bone, and traces of metal that, to the novice's eye, seem of little significance, scientists have discovered how to paint compelling pictures of our ancestral worlds. The methods geologists and paleontologists use - "time machines" - are as varied as the rock hammer and the thought experiment, comparative anatomy and the measure of sea levels, and DNA analysis and paleomagnetism.


The Lipan Apaches

Author by : Thomas Anthony Britten
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 97
Total Download : 860
File Size : 43,7 Mb
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Description : This study of one of the least known Apache tribes utilizes archival materials to reconstruct Lipan history through numerous threats to their society.


Amarillo

Author by : Paul Howard Carlson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Texas Tech University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 72
Total Download : 390
File Size : 43,6 Mb
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Description : "History of the founding of Amarillo and its progress from a small cowtown to the second largest city on the Texas High Plains. Includes social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of the city's development through its 118 years"--Provided by publisher.


The Wineslinger Chronicles

Author by : R. D. Kane
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 94
Total Download : 684
File Size : 43,6 Mb
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Description : "A chronicle of Texas's emergence as a wine-producing region. Relates the stories of winegrowers, past and present, who have contributed to Texas wine culture"--Provided by publisher.