Food And Identity In Early Rabbinic Judaism

Author by : Jordan Rosenblum
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 76
Total Download : 872
File Size : 51,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Food often defines societies and even civilizations. Through particular commensality restrictions, groups form distinct identities: Those with whom 'we' eat ('Us') and those with whom 'we' cannot eat ('Them'). This identity is enacted daily, turning the biological need to eat into a culturally significant activity. In this book, Jordan D. Rosenblum explores how food regulations and practices helped to construct the identity of early rabbinic Judaism. Bringing together the scholarship of rabbinics with that of food studies, this volume first examines the historical reality of food production and consumption in Roman-era Palestine. It then explores how early rabbinic food regulations created a distinct Jewish, male, and rabbinic identity. Rosenblum's work demonstrates how rabbinic food practices constructed an edible identity.


Food And Identity In Early Rabbinic Judaism

Author by : Jordan Rosenblum
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 48
Total Download : 852
File Size : 40,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Food often defines societies and even civilizations. Through particular commensality restrictions, groups form distinct identities. This identity is enacted daily, turning the biological need to eat into a culturally significant activity. In this book, Jordan D. Rosenblum explores how food regulations and practices helped to construct the identity of early rabbinic Judaism. Bringing together the scholarship of rabbinics with that of food studies, this volume first examines the historical reality of food production and consumption in Roman-era Palestine. It then explores how early rabbinic food regulations created a distinct Jewish, male, and rabbinic identity.


Meals In Early Judaism

Author by : S. Marks
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 581
File Size : 47,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This is the first book about the meals of Early Judaism. As such it breaks important new ground in establishing the basis for understanding the centrality of meals in this pivotal period of Judaism and providing a framework of historical patterns and influences.


Writing Food History

Author by : Kyri W. Claflin
Languange : en
Publisher by : Berg
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 85
Total Download : 787
File Size : 52,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The vibrant interest in food studies among both academics and amateurs has made food history an exciting field of investigation. Taking stock of three decades of groundbreaking multidisciplinary research, the book examines two broad questions: What has history contributed to the development of food studies? How have other disciplines - sociology, anthropology, literary criticism, science, art history - influenced writing on food history in terms of approach, methodology, controversies, and knowledge of past foodways? Essays by twelve prominent scholars provide a compendium of global and multicultural answers to these questions. The contributors critically assess food history writing in the United States, Africa, Mexico and the Spanish Diaspora, India, the Ottoman Empire, the Far East - China, Japan and Korea - Europe, Jewish communities and the Middle East. Several historical eras are covered: the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, Early Modern Europe and the Modern day. The book is a unique addition to the growing literature on food history. It is required reading for anyone seeking a detailed discussion of food history research in diverse times and places.


Feasting And Fasting

Author by : Aaron S. Gross
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 29
Total Download : 711
File Size : 40,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : How Judaism and food are intertwined Judaism is a religion that is enthusiastic about food. Jewish holidays are inevitably celebrated through eating particular foods, or around fasting and then eating particular foods. Through fasting, feasting, dining, and noshing, food infuses the rich traditions of Judaism into daily life. What do the complicated laws of kosher food mean to Jews? How does food in Jewish bellies shape the hearts and minds of Jews? What does the Jewish relationship with food teach us about Christianity, Islam, and religion itself? Can food shape the future of Judaism? Feasting and Fasting explores questions like these to offer an expansive look at how Judaism and food have been intertwined, both historically and today. It also grapples with the charged ethical debates about how food choices reflect competing Jewish values about community, animals, the natural world and the very meaning of being human. Encompassing historical, ethnographic, and theoretical viewpoints, and including contributions dedicated to the religious dimensions of foods including garlic, Crisco, peanut oil, and wine, the volume advances the state of both Jewish studies and religious studies scholarship on food. Bookended with a foreword by the Jewish historian Hasia Diner and an epilogue by the novelist and food activist Jonathan Safran Foer, Feasting and Fasting provides a resource for anyone who hungers to understand how food and religion intersect.


Everyday Sacred

Author by : Hillary Kaell
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 16
Total Download : 751
File Size : 47,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Over the last decade there has been ongoing discussion about the place of religion in Québécois society, particularly following the proposed Charter of Quebec Values in 2013. The essays in Everyday Sacred emerged from this active and often tense period of debate. Revitalizing an awareness of how people encounter, create, and employ religion in everyday life, contributors to this volume explore communities’ networks of beliefs, traditions, and relationships. Through broad comparisons beyond the Quebec context, contributors look at African Pentecostal congregations, an Iraqi Jewish community in Montreal, a rural Catholic parish on the Saint Lawrence River, and Tewehikan drumming in Wemotaci. They also examine wayside crosses, places of pilgrimage and devotion, debates on the regulation of the hijab, and the place of Montreal Spiritualists and transhumanists in the religious landscape. Seeking a holistic definition of Québécois religion, Everyday Sacred considers religious and secular identity, pluralism, the bodily and material aspects of religion, the impact of gender on community and the public sphere, and the rise of hybridity, sociality, and new technologies in transnational and online networks, in order to uncover the transmission of practices and beliefs from one generation to another. Disrupting familiar dichotomies between Catholicism and other religions, “founders” and immigrants, new religious movements and traditional institutions, Everyday Sacred marks the beginning of a sustained conversation on contemporary religion in Quebec, both inside and outside of the province. Contributors include: Emma Anderson (University of Ottawa), Randall Balmer (Dartmouth College), Hélène Charron (Université Laval), Elysia Guzik (University of Toronto), Laurent Jérôme (Université du Québec à Montréal), Norma B. Joseph (Concordia University), Cory Andrew Labrecque (Université Laval), Deirdre Meintel (Université de Montréal), Géraldine Mossière (Université de Montréal), Frédéric Parent (Université de Québec à Montréal), Meena Sharify-Funk (Wilfrid Laurier University).


Food And Religious Identities In Spain 1400 1600

Author by : Jillian Williams
Languange : en
Publisher by : Taylor & Francis
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 20
Total Download : 809
File Size : 48,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : In the late fourteenth century, the Iberian Peninsula was home to three major religions which coexisted in relative peace. Over the next two centuries, various political and social factors changed the face of Iberia dramatically. This book examines this period of dynamic change in Iberian history through the lens of food and its relationship to religious identity. It also provides a basis for further study of the connection between food and identities of all types. This study explores the role of food as an expression of religious identity made evident in things like fasting, feasting, ingredient choices, preparation methods and commensal relations. It considers the role of food in the formation and redefinition of religious identities throughout this period and its significance in the maintenance of ideological and physical boundaries between faiths. This is an insightful and unique look into inter-religious dynamics. It will therefore be of great interest to scholars of religious studies, early modern European history and food studies.


Global Jewish Foodways

Author by : Hasia R. Diner
Languange : en
Publisher by : U of Nebraska Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 43
Total Download : 141
File Size : 42,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The history of the Jewish people has been a history of migration. Although Jews invariably brought with them their traditional ideas about food during these migrations, just as invariably they engaged with the foods they encountered in their new environments. Their culinary habits changed as a result of both these migrations and the new political and social realities they encountered. The stories in this volume examine the sometimes bewildering kaleidoscope of food experiences generated by new social contacts, trade, political revolutions, wars, and migrations, both voluntary and compelled. This panoramic history of Jewish food highlights its breadth and depth on a global scale from Renaissance Italy to the post–World War II era in Israel, Argentina, and the United States and critically examines the impact of food on Jewish lives and on the complex set of laws, practices, and procedures that constitutes the Jewish dietary system and regulates what can be eaten, when, how, and with whom. Global Jewish Foodways offers a fresh perspective on how historical changes through migration, settlement, and accommodation transformed Jewish food and customs.


Food Virtue And The Shaping Of Early Christianity

Author by : Dana Robinson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 348
File Size : 53,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Greco-Roman food culture provides important concepts, grounded in everyday experience, which allow ordinary Christians to define virtue and create community.


Purity Body And Self In Early Rabbinic Literature

Author by : Mira Balberg
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 529
File Size : 50,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book explores the ways in which the early rabbis reshaped biblical laws of ritual purity and impurity and argues that the rabbis’ new purity discourse generated a unique notion of a bodily self. Focusing on the Mishnah, a Palestinian legal codex compiled around the turn of the third century CE, Mira Balberg shows how the rabbis constructed the processes of contracting, conveying, and managing ritual impurity as ways of negotiating the relations between one’s self and one’s body and, more broadly, the relations between one’s self and one’s human and nonhuman environments. With their heightened emphasis on subjectivity, consciousness, and self-reflection, the rabbis reinvented biblically inherited language and practices in a way that resonated with central cultural concerns and intellectual commitments of the Greco-Roman Mediterranean world. Purity, Body, and Self in Early Rabbinic Literature adds a new dimension to the study of practices of self-making in antiquity by suggesting that not only philosophical exercises but also legal paradigms functioned as sites through which the self was shaped and improved.


The Oxford Handbook Of Food History

Author by : Jeffrey M. Pilcher
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 80
Total Download : 805
File Size : 41,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The Oxford Handbook of Food History places existing works of food history in historiographical context, crossing disciplinary, chronological, and geographic boundaries, while also suggesting new routes for future research. The twenty-seven essays in this book are organized into five basic sections: historiography and disciplinary approaches as well as the production, circulation, and consumption of food.


Jewish Identity And Politics Between The Maccabees And Bar Kokhba

Author by : Benedikt Eckhardt
Languange : en
Publisher by : BRILL
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 14
Total Download : 999
File Size : 51,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Based on an interdisciplinary conference held in Münster, this volume discusses the interrelation between political change and Jewish identity in the three centuries between the Maccabean and the Bar Kokhba revolt (168 BCE – 135 CE).


Rabbinic Drinking

Author by : Jordan D. Rosenblum
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 60
Total Download : 992
File Size : 46,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Though ancient rabbinic texts are fundamental to analyzing the history of Judaism, they are also daunting for the novice to read. Rabbinic literature presumes tremendous prior knowledge, and its fascinating twists and turns in logic can be disorienting. Rabbinic Drinking helps learners at every level navigate this brilliant but mystifying terrain by focusing on rabbinic conversations about beverages, such as beer and wine, water, and even breast milk. By studying the contents of a drinking vessel—including the contexts and practices in which they are imbibed—Rabbinic Drinking surveys key themes in rabbinic literature to introduce readers to the main contours of this extensive body of historical documents. Features and Benefits: Contains a broad array of rabbinic passages, accompanied by didactic and rich explanations and contextual discussions, both literary and historical Thematic chapters are organized into sections that include significant and original translations of rabbinic texts Each chapter includes in-text references and concludes with a list of both referenced works and suggested additional readings


Food Religion And Communities In Early Modern Europe

Author by : Christopher Kissane
Languange : en
Publisher by : Bloomsbury Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 23
Total Download : 557
File Size : 54,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Using a three-part structure focused on the major historical subjects of the Inquisition, the Reformation and witchcraft, Christopher Kissane examines the relationship between food and religion in early modern Europe. Food, Religion and Communities in Early Modern Europe employs three key case studies in Castile, Zurich and Shetland to explore what food can reveal about the wider social and cultural history of early modern communities undergoing religious upheaval. Issues of identity, gender, cultural symbolism and community relations are analysed in a number of different contexts. The book also surveys the place of food in history and argues the need for historians not only to think more about food, but also with food in order to gain novel insights into historical issues. This is an important study for food historians and anyone seeking to understand the significant issues and events in early modern Europe from a fresh perspective.


Jewish Identity In Early Rabbinic Writings

Author by : Stern
Languange : en
Publisher by : BRILL
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 84
Total Download : 657
File Size : 44,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : An original study of Jewish identity or 'Jewishness' in all its social and cultural dimensions in Talmudic and Midrashic writings. Topics include the physical embodiment of Jewish identity, the 'boundaries' of Israel, and resistance to assimilation.


The Jewish Dietary Laws In The Ancient World

Author by : Jordan D. Rosenblum
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 98
Total Download : 341
File Size : 49,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : What did ancient Jews, Christians, Greeks, and Romans think about how and why Jews ate the way they did? Jordan D. Rosenblum examines this question.


My Perfect One

Author by : Jonathan Kaplan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press, USA
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 48
Total Download : 559
File Size : 41,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Most studies of the history of interpretation of the Song of Songs focus on its interpretation from late antiquity to modernity. InMy Perfect One, Kaplan maps the landscape of earlier rabinnic interpretation by investigating an underappreciated collection of interpretations of the Book found in rabbinic or Tannaitic literature from the first few centuries of the Common Era, known as the Halachic Midrashim. Kaplan advances two major claims: First, in a departure from earlier scholarship that too quickly classifies rabbinic interpretation of the Song of Songs as allegorical, he advocates a more nuanced reading of the approach of the early sages, who read the Song through a mode of typological interpretation concerned with the correspondence between Scripture and ideal events in history. Second, Kaplan contends that the early rabbinic approach to the text analyzes it using strategies similar to those used in reading epic poetry in antiquity. Throughout the book Kaplan explores ways in which this portrayal helped shape early rabbinic piety in the wake of the destruction, dislocation, and loss the Jewish community in the first two centuries of the Common Era, and how it provided the language to convey an important rabbinic theological idea--that despite the catastrophes of 70 C.E. and 135 C.E., God still loves Israel in a surpassing way and will right the catastrophe in his own time.


Time And Difference In Rabbinic Judaism

Author by : Sarit Kattan Gribetz
Languange : en
Publisher by : Princeton University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 89
Total Download : 216
File Size : 49,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : How the rabbis of late antiquity used time to define the boundaries of Jewish identity The rabbinic corpus begins with a question–“when?”—and is brimming with discussions about time and the relationship between people, God, and the hour. Time and Difference in Rabbinic Judaism explores the rhythms of time that animated the rabbinic world of late antiquity, revealing how rabbis conceptualized time as a way of constructing difference between themselves and imperial Rome, Jews and Christians, men and women, and human and divine. In each chapter, Sarit Kattan Gribetz explores a unique aspect of rabbinic discourse on time. She shows how the ancient rabbinic texts artfully subvert Roman imperialism by offering "rabbinic time" as an alternative to "Roman time." She examines rabbinic discourse about the Sabbath, demonstrating how the weekly day of rest marked "Jewish time" from "Christian time." Gribetz looks at gendered daily rituals, showing how rabbis created "men's time" and "women's time" by mandating certain rituals for men and others for women. She delves into rabbinic writings that reflect on how God spends time and how God's use of time relates to human beings, merging "divine time" with "human time." Finally, she traces the legacies of rabbinic constructions of time in the medieval and modern periods. Time and Difference in Rabbinic Judaism sheds new light on the central role that time played in the construction of Jewish identity, subjectivity, and theology during this transformative period in the history of Judaism.


Imagining The Jewish God

Author by : Leonard Kaplan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lexington Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 81
Total Download : 912
File Size : 41,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Jewish art has always been with us, but so has a broader canvas of Jewish imaginings: in thought, in emotion, in text, and in ritual practice. Imagining the Jewish God was there in the beginning, as it were, engraved and embedded in the ways Jews lived and responded to their God.This book attempts to give voice to these diverse imaginings of the Jewish God, and offers these collected essays and poems as a living text meant to provoke a substantive and nourishing dialogue. A responsive, living covenant lies at the heart of this book—a covenantal reciprocity that actively engages the dynamics of Jewish thinking and acting in dialogue with God. The contributors to this volume are committed to this form of textual reasoning, even as they all move us beyond the “text” as foundational for the imagined “people of the book.” That people, we submit, lives and breathes in and beyond the texts of poetry, narrative, sacred literature, film, and graphic mediums. We imagine the Jewish people, and the covenant they respond to, as provocative intimations of the divine. The essays in this volume seek to draw these vocal intimations out so that we can all hear their resonant call.


Foreigners And Their Food

Author by : David M. Freidenreich
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 90
Total Download : 788
File Size : 48,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Foreigners and Their Food explores how Jews, Christians, and Muslims conceptualize “us” and “them” through rules about the preparation of food by adherents of other religions and the act of eating with such outsiders. David M. Freidenreich analyzes the significance of food to religious formation, elucidating the ways ancient and medieval scholars use food restrictions to think about the “other.” Freidenreich illuminates the subtly different ways Jews, Christians, and Muslims perceive themselves, and he demonstrates how these distinctive self-conceptions shape ideas about religious foreigners and communal boundaries. This work, the first to analyze change over time across the legal literatures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, makes pathbreaking contributions to the history of interreligious intolerance and to the comparative study of religion.


Jewish Christian Dialogues On Scripture In Late Antiquity

Author by : Michal Bar-Asher Siegal
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 42
Total Download : 420
File Size : 49,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Marshalling previously untapped Christian materials, Bar-Asher Siegal offers radically new insights into Talmudic stories about Scriptural debates with Christian heretics.


Jewish Christians In Puritan England

Author by : Aidan Cottrell-Boyce
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wipf and Stock Publishers
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 23
Total Download : 235
File Size : 43,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : In the seventeenth century, in England, a remarkable number of small religious movements began adopting demonstratively Jewish ritual practices. They were labelled by their contemporaries as Judaizers. Why did this happen? Was it an excrescence of over-exuberant biblicism? Was it a by-product of the Protestant apocalyptic tradition? Was it a response to the changing status of the Jews in Europe? In Jewish Christians in Puritan England, Aidan Cottrell-Boyce argues that Puritan Judaizing was in fact an expression of another aspect of the Puritan experience: the need to be recognized as a ‘singular,’ positively distinctive, and Godly minority.


Jewish Muslim Relations

Author by : Ednan Aslan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer Nature
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 93
Total Download : 708
File Size : 48,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This multidisciplinary volume unites research on diverse aspects of Jewish-Muslim relations, exchanges and coexistence across time including the Abrahamic tradition enigma, Jews in the Qur’an and Hadith, Ibn al-‘Arabi and the Kabala, comparative feminist theology, Jews, Christians, Muslims and the Gospel of Barnabas, harmonizing religion and philosophy in Andalusia, Jews and Muslims in medieval Christian Spain, Israeli Jews and Muslim and Christian Arabs, Jewish-Muslim coexistence on Cyprus, Muslim-Jewish dialogues in Berlin and Barcelona, Jewish-Christian-Muslim trialogues and teleology, Jewish and Muslim dietary laws, and Jewish and Muslim integration in Switzerland and Germany.


Abraham S Luggage

Author by : Elizabeth Lambourn
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 38
Total Download : 872
File Size : 42,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : A single, unique document - a list of one merchant's baggage - is the starting point used to bring to life the twelfth-century Indian Ocean. Drawing connections between material culture, foodstuffs and the construction of identity, Lambourn examines notions of home and mobility at a key moment in world history.


Rabbinic Drinking

Author by : Jordan D. Rosenblum
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 80
Total Download : 185
File Size : 48,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Though ancient rabbinic texts are fundamental to analyzing the history of Judaism, they are also daunting for the novice to read. Rabbinic literature presumes tremendous prior knowledge, and its fascinating twists and turns in logic can be disorienting. Rabbinic Drinking helps learners at every level navigate this brilliant but mystifying terrain by focusing on rabbinic conversations about beverages, such as beer and wine, water, and even breast milk. By studying the contents of a drinking vessel—including the contexts and practices in which they are imbibed—Rabbinic Drinking surveys key themes in rabbinic literature to introduce readers to the main contours of this extensive body of historical documents. Features and Benefits: Contains a broad array of rabbinic passages, accompanied by didactic and rich explanations and contextual discussions, both literary and historical Thematic chapters are organized into sections that include significant and original translations of rabbinic texts Each chapter includes in-text references and concludes with a list of both referenced works and suggested additional readings


Sacred Scents In Early Christianity And Islam

Author by : Mary Thurlkill
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 19
Total Download : 795
File Size : 54,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Medieval scholars and cultural historians have recently turned their attention to the question of “smells” and what olfactory sensations reveal about society in general and holiness in particular. Sacred Scents in Early Christianity and Islam contributes to that conversation, explaining how early Christians and Muslims linked the “sweet smell of sanctity” with ideals of the body and sexuality; created boundaries and sacred space; and imagined their emerging communal identity. Most importantly, scent—itself transgressive and difficult to control—signaled transition and transformation between categories of meaning. Christian and Islamic authors distinguished their own fragrant ethical and theological ideals against the stench of oppositional heresy and moral depravity. Orthodox Christians ridiculed their ‘stinking’ Arian neighbors, and Muslims denounced the ‘reeking’ corruption of Umayyad and Abbasid decadence. Through the mouths of saints and prophets, patriarchal authors labeled perfumed women as existential threats to vulnerable men and consigned them to enclosed, private space for their protection as well as society’s. At the same time, theologians praised both men and women who purified and transformed their bodies into aromatic offerings to God. Both Christian and Muslim pilgrims venerated sainted men and women with perfumed offerings at tombstones; indeed, Christians and Muslims often worshipped together, honoring common heroes such as Abraham, Moses, and Jonah. Sacred Scents begins by surveying aroma’s quotidian functions in Roman and pre-Islamic cultural milieus within homes, temples, poetry, kitchens, and medicines. Existing scholarship tends to frame ‘scent’ as something available only to the wealthy or elite; however, perfumes, spices, and incense wafted through the lives of most early Christians and Muslims. It ends by examining both traditions’ views of Paradise, identified as the archetypal Garden and source of all perfumes and sweet smells. Both Christian and Islamic texts explain Adam and Eve’s profound grief at losing access to these heavenly aromas and celebrate God’s mercy in allowing earthly remembrances. Sacred scent thus prompts humanity’s grief for what was lost and the yearning for paradisiacal transformation still to come.


Jewish Childhood In The Roman World

Author by : Hagith Sivan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 93
Total Download : 906
File Size : 51,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The first full treatment of Jewish childhood in the Roman world. Explores the lives of minors both inside and outside the home.


Talmudic Transgressions

Author by : Charlotte Fonrobert
Languange : en
Publisher by : BRILL
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 21
Total Download : 654
File Size : 43,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : In Talmudic Transgressions, scholars offer new perspectives on rabbinic literature and related areas, in essays which respond to the work of Daniel Boyarin.


Raised On Christian Milk

Author by : John David Penniman
Languange : en
Publisher by : Yale University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 51
Total Download : 601
File Size : 53,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : A fascinating new study of the symbolic power of food and its role in forming kinship bonds and religious identity in early Christianity Scholar of religion John Penniman considers the symbolic importance of food in the early Roman world in an engaging and original new study that demonstrates how “eating well” was a pervasive idea that served diverse theories of growth, education, and religious identity. Penniman places early Christian discussion of food in its moral, medical, legal, and social contexts, revealing how nourishment, especially breast milk, was invested with the power to transfer characteristics, improve intellect, and strengthen kinship bonds.