Slavery And Freedom

Author by : James Oakes
Languange : en
Publisher by : W. W. Norton & Company
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 41
Total Download : 902
File Size : 53,8 Mb
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Description : Looks at the relationship between slavery and capitalism in nineteenth-century America, and describes how slave resistance affected American politics


Self Taught

Author by : Heather Andrea Williams
Languange : en
Publisher by : ReadHowYouWant.com
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 62
Total Download : 231
File Size : 42,7 Mb
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Description : With great skill, Heather Williams demonstrates the centrality of black people to the process of formal education - the establish-ment of schools, the creation of a cadre of teachers, the forging of standards of literacy and numeracy - in the post-emancipation years. As she does, Williams makes the case that the issue of education informed the Reconstruction period - the two-cornered struggle between North and South over the rebuilding of Southern society, the three-cornered struggle between white Northerners, white Southerners, and black people over the nature of education, and the less well known contest between black Northerners and black Southerners over the direction of African American culture. Self-Taught is a work of major significance.'' IRA BERLIN University of Maryland..... ''Self-Taught is not merely the most comprehensive documentation and analysis of African American education in the South during the 18611871 period, it is in every respect the first definitive study of the formative stages of universal literacy and formal education among ex-slaves. Never before has anyone described so fully the broad range of roles and the significant contributions of African Americans to the development of formal and public education in the South for themselves and for the entire region.'' JAMES D. ANDERSON University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Frederick Douglass

Author by : Frances E. Ruffin
Languange : en
Publisher by : Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 74
Total Download : 847
File Size : 44,7 Mb
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Description : The life of the famous abolitionist.


The Amistad Rebellion

Author by : Marcus Rediker
Languange : en
Publisher by : Penguin
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 23
Total Download : 770
File Size : 54,8 Mb
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Description : On June 28, 1839, the Spanish slave schooner Amistad set sail from Havana on a routine delivery of human cargo. On a moonless night, after four days at sea, the captive Africans rose up, killed the captain, and seized control of the ship. They attempted to sail to a safe port, but were captured by the U.S. Navy and thrown into jail in Connecticut. Their legal battle for freedom eventually made its way to the Supreme Court, where their cause was argued by former president John Quincy Adams. In a landmark ruling, they were freed and eventually returned to Africa. The rebellion became one of the best-known events in the history of American slavery, celebrated as a triumph of the legal system in films and books, all reflecting the elite perspective of the judges, politicians, and abolitionists involved in the case. In this powerful and highly original account, Marcus Rediker reclaims the rebellion for its true proponents: the African rebels who risked death to stake a claim for freedom. Using newly discovered evidence, Rediker reframes the story to show how a small group of courageous men fought and won an epic battle against Spanish and American slaveholders and their governments. He reaches back to Africa to find the rebels’ roots, narrates their cataclysmic transatlantic journey, and unfolds a prison story of great drama and emotion. Featuring vividly drawn portraits of the Africans, their captors, and their abolitionist allies, he shows how the rebels captured the popular imagination and helped to inspire and build a movement that was part of a grand global struggle between slavery and freedom. The actions aboard the Amistad that July night and in the days and months that followed were pivotal events in American and Atlantic history, but not for the reasons we have always thought. The successful Amistad rebellion changed the very nature of the struggle against slavery. As a handful of self-emancipated Africans steered their own course to freedom, they opened a way for millions to follow. This stunning book honors their achievement.


Ties That Bind

Author by : Tiya Miles
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 63
Total Download : 747
File Size : 55,5 Mb
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Description : "In this lyrical narrative about Shoeboots, Doll, and their descendants, Tiya Miles explores the constant push and tug between family connections and racial divides. Building on meticulous and inspired historical detective work, Miles shows what it might have felt like to be a slave and reassesses the convoluted ideas about race that slavery generated and left as a legacy."--Nancy Shoemaker, author of A Strange Likeness: Becoming Red and White in Eighteenth-Century North America "Ties That Bind is a haunting and innovative book. Tiya Miles refuses to avoid or cover over the most painful aspects of the shared stories of Indians and African Americans. Instead, Miles passionately defends the need to explore history, even when the facts provided by history are not those that contemporary people want to hear."--Peggy Pascoe, author of Relations of Rescue: The Search for Female Moral Authority in the American West, 1874-1939


Black Culture And Black Consciousness

Author by : Lawrence W. Levine
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press, USA
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 59
Total Download : 423
File Size : 42,5 Mb
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Description : Surveys the oral cultural heritage of black Americans as manifested in music, folk tales and heroes, and humor.


My Name Is Phillis Wheatley

Author by : Afua Cooper
Languange : en
Publisher by : Kids Can Press Ltd
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 16
Total Download : 513
File Size : 52,8 Mb
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Description : Presents a fictionalized account of Phillis Wheatley's childhood, from her capture and enslavement to her education and the publication of her poetry.


Working Slavery Pricing Freedom

Author by : Verene Shepherd
Languange : en
Publisher by : Macmillan
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 92
Total Download : 104
File Size : 46,5 Mb
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Description : Shepherd (history, U. of the West Indies, Mona campus, Jamaica), seeking to highlight the research activity of scholars who have brought the study of slavery and post-slavery societies into global, cross-cultural focus, presents 23 papers exploring the enslavement of Africans and its legacy in the Caribbean. The papers range temporally from the beginnings of the slave trade to the role of race in Jamaican politics in 1940. Much of the material focuses on the economics of slavery, but a significant number of contributions explore issues of gender, ethnicity, and other political realities. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.


Freedom

Author by : James Walvin
Languange : en
Publisher by : Hachette UK
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 71
Total Download : 935
File Size : 43,6 Mb
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Description : In this timely and very readable new work, Walvin focuses not on abolitionism or the brutality and suffering of slavery, but on resistance, the resistance of the enslaved themselves - from sabotage and absconding to full-blown uprisings - and its impact in overthrowing slavery. He also looks that whole Atlantic world, including the Spanish Empire and Brazil. In doing so, he casts new light on one of the major shifts in Western history in the past five centuries. In the three centuries following Columbus's landfall in the Americas, slavery became a critical institution across swathes of both North and South America. It saw twelve million Africans forced onto slave ships, and had seismic consequences for Africa. It led to the transformation of the Americas and to the material enrichment of the Western world. It was also largely unquestioned. Yet within a mere seventy-five years during the nineteenth century slavery had vanished from the Americas: it declined, collapsed and was destroyed by a complexity of forces that, to this day, remains disputed, but there is no doubting that it was in large part defeated by those it had enslaved. Slavery itself came in many shapes and sizes. It is perhaps best remembered on the plantations - though even those can deceive. Slavery varied enormously from one crop to another- sugar, tobacco, rice, coffee, cotton. And there was in addition myriad tasks for the enslaved to do, from shipboard and dockside labour, to cattlemen on the frontier, through to domestic labour and child-care duties. Slavery was, then, both ubiquitous and varied. But if all these millions of diverse, enslaved people had one thing in common it was a universal detestation of their bondage. They wanted an end to it: they wanted to be like the free people around them. Most of these enslaved peoples did not live to see freedom. But an old freed man or woman in, say Cuba or Brazil in the 1880s, had lived through its destruction clean across the Americas. The collapse of slavery and the triumph of black freedom constitutes an extraordinary historical upheaval - and this book explains how that happened.


Many Thousands Gone

Author by : Ira Berlin
Languange : en
Publisher by : Harvard University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 72
Total Download : 423
File Size : 44,9 Mb
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Description : Today most Americans, black and white, identify slavery with cotton, the deep South, and the African-American church. But at the beginning of the nineteenth century, after almost two hundred years of African-American life in mainland North America, few slaves grew cotton, lived in the deep South, or embraced Christianity. Many Thousands Gone traces the evolution of black society from the first arrivals in the early seventeenth century through the Revolution. In telling their story, Ira Berlin, a leading historian of southern and African-American life, reintegrates slaves into the history of the American working class and into the tapestry of our nation. Laboring as field hands on tobacco and rice plantations, as skilled artisans in port cities, or soldiers along the frontier, generation after generation of African Americans struggled to create a world of their own in circumstances not of their own making. In a panoramic view that stretches from the North to the Chesapeake Bay and Carolina lowcountry to the Mississippi Valley, Many Thousands Gone reveals the diverse forms that slavery and freedom assumed before cotton was king. We witness the transformation that occurred as the first generations of creole slaves--who worked alongside their owners, free blacks, and indentured whites--gave way to the plantation generations, whose back-breaking labor was the sole engine of their society and whose physical and linguistic isolation sustained African traditions on American soil. As the nature of the slaves' labor changed with place and time, so did the relationship between slave and master, and between slave and society. In this fresh and vivid interpretation, Berlin demonstrates that the meaning of slavery and of race itself was continually renegotiated and redefined, as the nation lurched toward political and economic independence and grappled with the Enlightenment ideals that had inspired its birth.