Gender And The Social Gospel

Author by : Wendy J. Deichmann Edwards
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Illinois Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 20
Total Download : 560
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Description : This collection of essays examines the central, yet often overlooked, role played by women in the formation of the social gospel movement in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A practical theological response to the stark realities of poverty and injustice prevalent in turn-of-the-century America, the social gospel movement sought to apply the teachings of Jesus and the message of Christian salvation to society by striving to improve the lives of the impoverished and the disenfranchised. The contributors to this volume set out to broaden our understanding of this radical movement by examining the lives of some of its passionate and vibrant female participants and the ways in which their involvement expanded and enriched the scope of its activity. In addition to examining the lives of individual women, the essays in Gender and the Social Gospel contain broader analyses of the gender and racial issues that have caused the histories of movements such as the social gospel to be viewed almost exclusively in terms of their male, European-American, intellectual participants at the expense of the women, African Americans, and Canadians whose contributions were just as worthy of attention.


The Westminster Handbook To Women In American Religious History

Author by : Susan Hill Lindley
Languange : en
Publisher by : Westminster John Knox Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 13
Total Download : 456
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Description : The Westminster Handbook to Women in American Religious History provides an affordable and accessible reference to over 750 outstanding individual women and women's organizations in American religious history.--From publisher description.


The Social Gospel In American Religion

Author by : Christopher H. Evans
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 68
Total Download : 822
File Size : 43,8 Mb
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Description : A remarkable history of the powerful and influential social gospel movement. The global crises of child labor, alcoholism and poverty were all brought to our attention through the social gospel movement. Its impact on American society makes it one of the most influential developments in American religious history. Christopher H. Evans traces the development of the social gospel in American Protestantism, and illustrates how the religious idealism of the movement also rose up within Judaism and Catholicism. Contrary to the works of previous historians, Evans demonstrates how the presence of the social gospel continued in American culture long after its alleged demise following World War I. Evans reveals the many aspects of the social gospel and their influence on a range of social movements during the twentieth century, culminating with the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s. It also explores the relationship between the liberal social gospel of the early twentieth century and later iterations of social reform in late twentieth century evangelicalism. The Social Gospel in American Religion considers an impressive array of historical figures including Washington Gladden, Emil Hirsch, Frances Willard, Reverdy Ransom, Walter Rauschenbusch, Stephen Wise, John Ryan, Harry Emerson Fosdick, A.J. Muste, Georgia Harkness, and Benjamin Mays. It demonstrates how these figures contributed to the shape of the social gospel in America, while arguing that the movement’s legacy lies in its profound influence on broader traditions of liberal-progressive political reform in American history.


The Social Gospel Today

Author by : Christopher Hodge Evans
Languange : en
Publisher by : Westminster John Knox Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 75
Total Download : 404
File Size : 47,8 Mb
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Description : The contributors explore how the theological tradition of the Social Gospel, born within the social and cultural dislocations of late 19th-century America, relates to the dislocations of the current American scene. The contributors argue that America's only indigenous theological tradition remains powerfully relevant to mainline churches and to the scholars who work out of these institutions.


Encyclopedia Of Women And Religion In North America

Author by : Rosemary Skinner Keller
Languange : en
Publisher by : Indiana University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 79
Total Download : 637
File Size : 45,9 Mb
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Description : A fundamental and well-illustrated reference collection for anyone interested in the role of women in North American religious life.


Saving Women

Author by : Laceye C. Warner
Languange : en
Publisher by : Baylor University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 17
Total Download : 479
File Size : 55,9 Mb
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Description : A theology of evangelism created out of womens evangelistic practices


Social Policy And Social Change

Author by : Jillian Jimenez
Languange : en
Publisher by : SAGE Publications
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 27
Total Download : 786
File Size : 46,9 Mb
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Description : The Second Edition of Social Policy and Social Change is a timely examination of the field, unique in its inclusion of both a historical analysis of problems and policy and an exploration of how capitalism and the market economy have contributed to them. The New Edition of this seminal text examines issues of discrimination, health care, housing, income, and child welfare and considers the policies that strive to improve them. With a focus on how domestic social policies can be transformed to promote social justice for all groups, Jimenez et al. consider the impact of globalization in the United States while addressing developing concerns now emerging in the global village.


Social Policy And Social Change

Author by : Jillian Jimenez
Languange : en
Publisher by : SAGE
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 788
File Size : 47,9 Mb
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Description : A timely examination of social policy through a social constructivist and economic lens, Social Policy and Social Change illuminates the root causes of common social problems and how policy has attempted to ameliorate them. In so doing, the book focuses on how social policies in the United States can be transformed to promote social justice for all groups. The book uniquely offers both an historical analysis of social problems and social policies, and an economic analysis of how capitalism and the market economy have contributed to social problems and impacted social policies. The book goes beyond the U.S. borders to examine the impact of globalization in the United States and in the Global South. It considers the meaning and impact of the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States and explores the policy solutions his administration has proposed to deal with the economic recession of 2008-2009. The book also discusses social workers as agents of social change and advocates of social and economic justice. It examines five key realms: Poverty in families and the welfare system, poverty among the elderly and social security, child maltreatment and child welfare policy, health and mental health policy, and housing policy. Social Policy and Social Change is a primary text for social policy/social welfare policy courses in MSW programs and possibly some higher level BSW programs. It will be supplemented with a comprehensive ancillary program, including a test bank, instructor's manual, and student website.


St Mark S And The Social Gospel

Author by : Ellen Blue
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ. of Tennessee Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 45
Total Download : 403
File Size : 44,9 Mb
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Description : The impact of St. Mark’s Community Center and United Methodist Church on the city of New Orleans is immense. Their stories are dramatic reflections of the times. But these stories are more than mere reflections because St. Mark’s changed the picture, leading the way into different understandings of what urban diversity could and should mean. This book looks at the contributions of St. Mark’s, in particular the important role played by women (especially deaconesses) as the church confronted social issues through the rise of the social gospel movement and into the modern civil rights era. Ellen Blue uses St. Mark’s as a microcosm to tell a larger, overlooked story about women in the Methodist Church and the sources of reform. One of the few volumes on women’s history within the church, this book challenges the dominant narrative of the social gospel movement and its past. St. Mark’s and the Social Gospel begins by examining the period between 1895 and World War I, chronicling the center’s development from its early beginnings as a settlement house that served immigrants and documenting the early social gospel activities of Methodist women in New Orleans. Part II explores the efforts of subsequent generations of women to further gender and racial equality between the 1920s and 1960. Major topics addressed in this section include an examination of the deaconesses’ training in Christian Socialist economic theory and the church’s response to the Brown decision. The third part focuses on the church’s direct involvement in the school desegregation crisis of 1960 , including an account of the pastor who broke the white boycott of a desegregated elementary school by taking his daughter back to class there. Part IV offers a brief look at the history of St. Mark’s since 1965. Shedding new light on an often neglected subject, St. Mark’s and the Social Gospel will be welcomed by scholars of religious history, local history, social history, and women’s studies.


Gender And American Social Science

Author by : Helene Silverberg
Languange : en
Publisher by : Princeton University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 16
Total Download : 800
File Size : 42,8 Mb
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Description : In contrast, this volume draws long overdue attention to the ways in which changing gender relations shaped the development and organization of the new social knowledge. And it challenges the privileged position that academic - and mostly male - social science has been granted in traditional histories by showing how women produced and popularized new forms of social knowledge in such places as settlement houses and the Russell Sage Foundation.


The Encyclodedia Of Christianity

Author by : Erwin Fahlbusch
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 31
Total Download : 359
File Size : 44,6 Mb
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Description : A monumental reference work that addresses the broad interest in Christianity and religion around the world describes the Christian faith and community in their myriad forms--today and throughout the two thousand years of Christian history.


Feminist Interpretations Of Jane Addams

Author by : Maurice Hamington
Languange : en
Publisher by : Penn State Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 89
Total Download : 840
File Size : 50,7 Mb
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Description : "A collection of articles that address Jane Addams (1860-1935) in terms of her contribution to feminist philosophy and theory through her work on culture, art, sex, society, religion, and politics"--Provided by publisher.


The Eclipse Of Liberal Protestantism In The Netherlands

Author by : Tom-Eric Krijger
Languange : en
Publisher by : BRILL
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 83
Total Download : 310
File Size : 41,9 Mb
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Description : In The Eclipse of Liberal Protestantism in the Netherlands, Tom-Eric Krijger offers a new interpretation of the development of the Protestant modernist movement in Dutch religious, social, cultural, and political life between 1870 and 1940.


Encyclopedia Of Activism And Social Justice

Author by : Gary L. Anderson
Languange : en
Publisher by : SAGE Publications
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 28
Total Download : 321
File Size : 50,7 Mb
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Description : The Encyclopedia of Activism and Social Justice presents a comprehensive overview of the field with topics of varying dimensions, breadth, and length. This three-volume Encyclopedia is designed for readers to understand the topics, concepts, and ideas that motivate and shape the fields of activism, civil engagement, and social justice and includes biographies of the major thinkers and leaders who have influenced and continue to influence the study of activism.


Women And Justice For The Poor

Author by : Felice Batlan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 32
Total Download : 555
File Size : 55,8 Mb
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Description : This book re-examines fundamental assumptions about the American legal profession and the boundaries between "professional" lawyers, "lay" lawyers, and social workers. Putting legal history and women's history in dialogue, it details the history of the origins and development of free legal aid for the poor in the United States.


Religion Race And The American Presidency

Author by : Gaston Espinosa
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 36
Total Download : 161
File Size : 42,8 Mb
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Description : The role that race and religion play in American presidential elections is attracting national attention like never before. The 2008 presidential candidates reached out to an unprecedented number of racial and religious voting constituencies including African Americans, Latinos, Muslims, Mainline Protestants, Catholics, Evangelicals, Jews, women, the non-religious, and more. Religion, Race, and the American Presidency focuses on the roles of these racial and religious groups in presidential elections over the last forty years, and in elections since 2000 in particular. Drawing upon survey data, interviews, and case studies of recent presidents, the contributors examine the complicated relationships between American presidents and key racial and religious groups. The paperback edition features a new capstone chapter on the 2008 elections. Contributions by Brian Robert Calfano, David G. Dalin, Paul A. Djupe, Gastón Espinosa, John C. Green, Melissa V. Harris-Lacewell, Lyman A. Kellstedt, So Young Kim, David C. Leege, Laura R. Olson, Corwin Smidt, Katherine E. Stenger, and Adam L. Warber.


In Black And White

Author by : Lily Hardy Hammond
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Georgia Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 78
Total Download : 144
File Size : 47,9 Mb
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Description : “Our problem is not racial, but human and economic. . . . We hold the Negro racially responsible for conditions common to all races on his economic plane.” The writings of reformer Lily Hardy Hammond (1859-1925) are filled with such forthright criticisms of southern white attitudes toward African Americans--enough so that her stature as a southern progressive thinker would seem assured. Yet Hammond, who once stood at the intellectual center of the southern women’s social gospel movement and was in her time the South’s most prolific female writer on the “race question,” has been marginalized. This volume reprintsIn Black and White, the most important of Hammond’s ten books, along with a sampling of the dozens of articles she published. Elna C. Green’s biographical introduction tells of Hammond’s marriage to a prominent Methodist minister and educator. It also traces Hammond’s career within the context of prevailing gender and racial attitudes in the Jim Crow South. Hammond, who had roots in Methodist home mission work, was also active in such secular and ecumenical organizations as the Southern Sociological Congress, the Commission on Interracial Cooperation, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Hammond worked alongside blacks to promote education, improve living conditions, and stop lynching. As a suffragist and temperance advocate, she urged the leaders of those largely white women’s movements to partner with African Americans. Historians of religion, social science, and race relations will welcome the reintroduction of this remarkable but virtually forgotten figure.


Liberty Equality And Justice

Author by : Ross Evans Paulson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Duke University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 977
File Size : 49,8 Mb
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Description : A history of social change at a critical period in American history, from the end of the Civil War to the early days of the Depression.


Foreign Exchange

Author by : Judith Liu
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 84
Total Download : 834
File Size : 43,7 Mb
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Description : Foreign Exchange is the story of two women and their experiences at an American Episcopalian missionary school in Wuhan from 1929-1937. Yeh Yuanshuang was a student from a privileged Chinese family; Dorothea Kingsley Wakeman was a short-term teacher from a privileged American family. Both would be transformed by their experiences at St. Hilda's School for Girls, whose walls served to protect the school from outside danger as well as to help create a space where new gender expectations could be nurtured, hidden away from the gaze of prying eyes. Examining St. Hilda's through the experiences of these two women illuminates the liberating qualities of female education, the power of personal narrative as an ethnographic/historical research tool, and how the stories of Yuanshuang and Dorothea are embedded in the historical circumstances of their times. The telling of their stories also reveals the impact of the modern world on their parents' generation.


Social Work Leaders Through History

Author by : Dr. Jessica Gladden, PhD, LMSW
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer Publishing Company
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 74
Total Download : 470
File Size : 40,9 Mb
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Description : Vividly portraying the personal and professional lives of social work luminaries from the 19th to the present century, this text links their groundbreaking contributions in social work to current CSWE core competencies. The book focuses on leaders who shaped the field across modern American history — the Progressive Era, the Great Society, the New Deal, the Postwar period, and others—and examines their lives in the context of the social and historical environment, their contributions to social work, and lessons from their experiences that are still relevant to social work today. Through detailed, engaging life stories and photographs, readers—including undergraduates, graduate students, and practicing social workers—will learn about the profession’s rich history rooted in charitable work, “friendly visitors,” and social justice advocacy. The book also touches upon the contributions of early social work pioneers as well as those leading us forward in the 21st century. The book will provide important historical groundwork for classes in social welfare policy, introduction to social work, and social work history courses. Chapters include discussion questions and activities to facilitate professional growth and personal development. A robust instructor package offers PowerPoint slides and a sample syllabus. Key Features: Delivers vivid, detailed accounts of leading figures in social work history Presents lessons directly applicable to social work today Dovetails with CSWE’s 2015 EPAS Competencies Incorporates discussion questions and activities encouraging professional growth and personal reflection Includes PowerPoint slides and sample syllabus


St Mark S And The Social Gospel

Author by : Ellen Blue
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ Tennessee Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 49
Total Download : 403
File Size : 53,8 Mb
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Description : The impact of St. Mark’s Community Center and United Methodist Church on the city of New Orleans is immense. Their stories are dramatic reflections of the times. But these stories are more than mere reflections because St. Mark’s changed the picture, leading the way into different understandings of what urban diversity could and should mean. This book looks at the contributions of St. Mark’s, in particular the important role played by women (especially deaconesses) as the church confronted social issues through the rise of the social gospel movement and into the modern civil rights era. Ellen Blue uses St. Mark’s as a microcosm to tell a larger, overlooked story about women in the Methodist Church and the sources of reform. One of the few volumes on women’s history within the church, this book challenges the dominant narrative of the social gospel movement and its past. St. Mark’s and the Social Gospel begins by examining the period between 1895 and World War I, chronicling the center’s development from its early beginnings as a settlement house that served immigrants and documenting the early social gospel activities of Methodist women in New Orleans. Part II explores the efforts of subsequent generations of women to further gender and racial equality between the 1920s and 1960. Major topics addressed in this section include an examination of the deaconesses’ training in Christian Socialist economic theory and the church’s response to the Brown decision. The third part focuses on the church’s direct involvement in the school desegregation crisis of 1960 , including an account of the pastor who broke the white boycott of a desegregated elementary school by taking his daughter back to class there. Part IV offers a brief look at the history of St. Mark’s since 1965. Shedding new light on an often neglected subject, St. Mark’s and the Social Gospel will be welcomed by scholars of religious history, local history, social history, and women’s studies.


Canadian Methodist Women 1766 1925

Author by : Marilyn Färdig Whiteley
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 19
Total Download : 583
File Size : 52,7 Mb
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Description : Canadian Methodist women, like women of all religious traditions, have expressed their faith in accordance with their denominational heritage. Canadian Methodist Women, 1766-1925: Marys, Marthas, Mothers in Israel analyzes the spiritual life and the varied activities of women whose faith helped shape the life of the Methodist Church and of Canadian society from the latter half of the eighteenth century until church union in 1925. Based on extensive readings of periodicals, biographies, autobiographies, and the records of many women’s groups across Canada, as well as early histories of Methodism, Marilyn Färdig Whiteley tells the story of ordinary women who provided hospitality for itinerant preachers, taught Sunday school, played the melodeon, selected and supported women missionaries, and taught sewing to immigrant girls, thus expressing their faith according to their opportunities. In performing these tasks they sometimes expanded women’s roles well beyond their initial boundaries. Focusing on religious practices, Canadian Methodist Women, 1766-1925 provides a broad perspective on the Methodist movement that helped shape nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Canadian society. The use and interpretation of many new or little-used sources will interest those wishing to learn more about the history of women in religion and in Canadian society.


Ungodly Women

Author by : Betty A. DeBerg
Languange : en
Publisher by : Mercer University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 41
Total Download : 139
File Size : 52,7 Mb
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Description : As regards both academic historians and popular understandings since the rise of the Religious Right in the 1980s, analysis of American fundamentalism has neglected a large body of literature about gender roles and social conventions. Betty A. DeBerg's groundbreaking study fills that important gap, analyzing the roots and character of fundamentalism in light of rapid changes and severe disruptions in gender-role ideology and actual social behavior in America between 1880 and 1930. Unlike interpreters such as George Marsden -- who has seen the contemporary Religious Right's concerns over feminism, abortion, and the breakdown of the family as recent developments -- DeBerg convincingly argues that these concerns were central in the "first wave of American fundamentalism." - Back cover.


Black Women S Christian Activism

Author by : Betty Livingston Adams
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 90
Total Download : 767
File Size : 43,8 Mb
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Description : 2017 Wilbur Non-Fiction Award Recipient In Black Women’s Christian Activism, Betty Livingston Adams examines the oft overlooked role of non-elite black women in the growth of northern suburbs and American Protestantism in the first half of the twentieth century. When a domestic servant named Violet Johnson moved to the affluent white suburb of Summit, New Jersey in 1897, she became one of just barely a hundred black residents in the town of six thousand. In this avowedly liberal Protestant community, the very definition of “the suburbs” depended on observance of unmarked and fluctuating race and class barriers. But Johnson did not intend to accept the status quo. Establishing a Baptist church a year later, a seemingly moderate act that would have implications far beyond weekly worship, Johnson challenged assumptions of gender and race, advocating for a politics of civic righteousness that would grant African Americans an equal place in a Christian nation. Johnson’s story is powerful, but she was just one among the many working-class activists integral to the budding days of the civil rights movement. Focusing on the strategies and organizational models church women employed in the fight for social justice, Adams tracks the intersections of politics and religion, race and gender, and place and space in a New York City suburb, a local example that offers new insights on northern racial oppression and civil rights protest. As this book makes clear, religion made a key difference in the lives and activism of ordinary black women who lived, worked, and worshiped on the margin during this tumultuous time.


The Religious History Of American Women

Author by : Catherine A. Brekus
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of North Carolina Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 68
Total Download : 800
File Size : 41,9 Mb
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Description : More than a generation after the rise of women's history alongside the feminist movement, it is still difficult, observes Catherine Brekus, to locate women in histories of American religion. Mary Dyer, a Quaker who was hanged for heresy; Lizzie Robinson, a former slave and laundress who sold Bibles door to door; Sally Priesand, a Reform rabbi; Estela Ruiz, who saw a vision of the Virgin Mary--how do these women's stories change our understanding of American religious history and American women's history? In this provocative collection of twelve essays, contributors explore how considering the religious history of American women can transform our dominant historical narratives. Covering a variety of topics--including Mormonism, the women's rights movement, Judaism, witchcraft trials, the civil rights movement, Catholicism, everyday religious life, Puritanism, African American women's activism, and the Enlightenment--the volume enhances our understanding of both religious history and women's history. Taken together, these essays sound the call for a new, more inclusive history. Contributors: Ann Braude, Harvard Divinity School Catherine A. Brekus, University of Chicago Divinity School Anthea D. Butler, University of Rochester Emily Clark, Tulane University Kathleen Sprows Cummings, University of Notre Dame Amy Koehlinger, Florida State University Janet Moore Lindman, Rowan University Susanna Morrill, Lewis and Clark College Kristy Nabhan-Warren, Augustana College Pamela S. Nadell, American University Elizabeth Reis, University of Oregon Marilyn J. Westerkamp, University of California, Santa Cruz


The Gender And Consumer Culture Reader

Author by : Jennifer Scanlon
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 98
Total Download : 321
File Size : 50,6 Mb
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Description : From its sweaty beats to the pulsating music on the streets, Latin/o America is perceived in the United States as the land of heat, the toy store for Western sex. It is the territory of magical fantasy and of revolutionary threat, where topography is the travel guide of desire, directing imperial voyeurs to the exhibition of the flesh. Jose Quiroga flips the stereotype upside down: he shows how Latin/o American lesbians and gay men have consistently eschewed notions of sexual identity for a politics of intervention. In Tropics of Desire, Quiroga reads hesitant Mexican poets as sex-positive voices, he questions how outing and identity politics can fall prey to the manipulations of the state, and explores how invisibility has been used as a tactical tool in opposition to the universal imperative to come out. Drawing on diverse cultural examples such as the performance of bolero and salsa, film, literature, and correspondence, and influenced by masters like Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin and a rich tradition of Latin American stylists, Quiroga argues for a politics that denies biological determinism and cannibalizes cultural stereotypes for the sake of political action.


American Religious History Belief And Society Through Time 3 Volumes

Author by : Gary Scott Smith
Languange : en
Publisher by : ABC-CLIO
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 17
Total Download : 906
File Size : 40,9 Mb
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Description : A mix of thematic essays, reference entries, and primary source documents covering the role of religion in American history and life from the colonial era to the present. Often controversial, religion has been an important force in shaping American culture. Religious convictions strongly influenced colonial and state governments as well as the United States as a new republic. Religious teachings, values, and practices deeply affected political structures and policies, economic ideology and practice, educational institutions and instruction, social norms and customs, marriage, and family life. By analyzing religion's interaction with American culture and prominent religious leaders and ideologies, this reference helps readers to better understand many fascinating, often controversial, religious leaders, ideas, events, and topics. The work is organized in three volumes devoted to particular periods. Volume one includes a chronology highlighting key events related to religion in American history and an introduction that overviews religion in America during the period covered by the volume, and roughly 10 essays that explore significant themes. These essays are followed by approximately 120 alphabetically arranged reference entries providing objective, fundamental information about topics related to religion in America. Each volume presents nearly 50 primary source documents, each introduced by a contextualizing headnote. A selected, general bibliography closes volume three. Timelines in each volume highlight key events in American religious history Some 30 essays survey broad themes central to American religious history Roughly 360 reference entries provide fundamental information about specific topics related to religion in American history Excerpts from around 150 primary source documents provide first-hand accounts of how religion has shaped American history Entry bibliographies and a selected, general, end-of-work bibliography direct users to additional information resources


Building The Old Time Religion

Author by : Priscilla Pope-Levison
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 354
File Size : 48,8 Mb
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Description : 2015 Smith/Wynkoop Book Award presented by the Wesleyan Theological Society 2014 Choice Outstanding Academic Title During the Progessive Era, a period of unprecedented ingenuity, women evangelists built the old time religion with brick and mortar, uniforms and automobiles, fresh converts and devoted protégés. Across America, entrepreneurial women founded churches, denominations, religious training schools, rescue homes, rescue missions, and evangelistic organizations. Until now, these intrepid women have gone largely unnoticed, though their collective yet unchoreographed decision to build institutions in the service of evangelism marked a seismic shift in American Christianity. In this ground-breaking study, Priscilla Pope-Levison dusts off the unpublished letters, diaries, sermons, and yearbooks of these pioneers to share their personal tribulations and public achievements. The effect is staggering. With an uncanny eye for essential details and a knack for historical nuance, Pope-Levison breathes life into not just one or two of these women—but two dozen.