Grzimek S Animal Life Encyclopedia 2nd Ed Thomson Gale Group 2004

Author by : Thomson-Gale Group
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Description : Gzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia is an internationally prominent scientific reference compilation, first published in German in the late 1960s, under the editorship of zoologist Bernhard Grzimek (1909-1987). In a cooperative effort between Gale and the American Zoo and Aquarium Association, the series is being completely revised and updated for the first time in over 30 years. Gale is expanding the series from 13 to 17 volumes, commissioning new color images, and updating the information while also making the set easier to use. The order of revisions is: Vol 8–11: Birds I–IV Vol 6: Amphibians Vol 7: Reptiles Vol 4–5: Fishes I–II Vol 12–16: Mammals I–V Vol 1: Lower Metazoans and Lesser Deuterostomes Vol 2: Protostomes Vol 3: Insects Vol 17: Cumulative Index Organized by taxonomy The overall structure of this reference work is based on the classification of animals into naturally related groups, a discipline known as taxonomy—the science through which various organisms are discovered, identified, described, named, classified, and catalogued. Starting with the simplest life forms, the lower metazoans and lesser deuterostomes, in volume 1, the series progresses through the more complex animal classes, culminating with the mammals in volumes 12–16. Volume 17 is a stand-alone cumulative index. Organization of chapters within each volume reinforces the taxonomic hierarchy. In the case of the Mammals volumes, introductory chapters describe general characteristics of all organisms in these groups, followed by taxonomic chapters dedicated to Order, Family, or Subfamily. Species accounts appear at the end of the Family and Subfamily chapters To help the reader grasp the scientific arrangement, each type of chapter has a distinctive color and symbol: ● =Order Chapter (blue background) ●▲ =Monotypic Order Chapter (green background) ▲ =Family Chapter (yellow background) =Subfamily Chapter (yellow background) Introductory chapters have a loose structure, reminiscent of the first edition. While not strictly formatted, Order chapters are carefully structured to cover basic information about member families. Monotypic orders, comprised of a single family, utilize family chapter organization. Family and subfamily chapters are most tightly structured, following a prescribed format of standard rubrics that make information easy to find and understand. Family chapters typically include: Thumbnail introduction Common name Scientific name Class Order Suborder Family Thumbnail description Size Number of genera, species Habitat Conservation status Main essay Evolution and systematics Physical characteristics Distribution Habitat Behavior Feeding ecology and diet Reproductive biology Conservation status Significance to humans Species accounts Common name Scientific name Subfamily Taxonomy Other common names Physical characteristics Distribution Habitat Behavior xii Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia • • • • • How to use this book Feeding ecology and diet Reproductive biology Conservation status Significance to humans Resources Books Periodicals Organizations Other Color graphics enhance understanding Grzimek’s features approximately 3,000 color photos, including approximately 1,560 in five Mammals volumes; 3,500 total color maps, including nearly 550 in the Mammals volumes; and approximately 5,500 total color illustrations, including approximately 930 in the Mammals volumes. Each featured species of animal is accompanied by both a distribution map and an illustration. All maps in Grzimek’s were created specifically for the project by XNR Productions. Distribution information was provided by expert contributors and, if necessary, further researched at the University of Michigan Zoological Museum library. Maps are intended to show broad distribution, not definitive ranges. All the color illustrations in Grzimek’s were created specifically for the project by Michigan Science Art. Expert contributors recommended the species to be illustrated and provided feedback to the artists, who supplemented this information with authoritative references and animal skins from University of Michgan Zoological Museum library. In addition to species illustrations, Grzimek’s features conceptual drawings that illustrate characteristic traits and behaviors. About the contributors The essays were written by scientists, professors, and other professionals. Grzimek’s subject advisors reviewed the completed essays to insure consistency and accuracy. Standards employed In preparing these volumes, the editors adopted a conservative approach to taxonomy, relying on Wilson and Reeder’s Mammal Species of the World: a Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (1993) as a guide. Systematics is a dynamic discipline in that new species are being discovered continuously, and new techniques (e.g., DNA sequencing) frequently result in changes in the hypothesized evolutionary relationships among various organisms. Consequently, controversy often exists regarding classification of a particular animal or group of animals; such differences are mentioned in the text. Grzimek’s has been designed with ready reference in mind and the editors have standardized information wherever feasible. For Conservation status, Grzimek’s follows the IUCN Red List system, developed by its Species Survival Commission. The Red List provides the world’s most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plants and animals. Using a set of criteria to evaluate extinction risk, the IUCN recognizes the following categories: Extinct, Extinct in the Wild, Critically Endangered, Endangered, Vulnerable, Conservation Dependent, Near Threatened, Least Concern, and Data Deficient. For a complete explanation of each category, visit the IUCN web page at . Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia xiii How to use this book Series advisor Michael Hutchins, PhD Director of Conservation and Science/William Conway Chair American Zoo and Aquarium Association Silver Spring, Maryland Subject advisors


Grzimek S Animal Life Encyclopedia 2 Nd Ed Gale Thomson 2003

Author by : Gale Group
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Description : Earth is teeming with life. No one knows exactly how many distinct organisms inhabit our planet, but more than 5 million different species of animals and plants could exist, ranging from microscopic algae and bacteria to gigantic elephants, redwood trees and blue whales. Yet, throughout this wonderful tapestry of living creatures, there runs a single thread: Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA. The existence of DNA, an elegant, twisted organic molecule that is the building block of all life, is perhaps the best evidence that all living organisms on this planet share a common ancestry. Our ancient connection to the living world may drive our curiosity, and perhaps also explain our seemingly insatiable desire for information about animals and nature. Noted zoologist, E.O. Wilson, recently coined the term “biophilia” to describe this phenomenon. The term is derived from the Greek bios meaning “life” and philos meaning “love.” Wilson argues that we are human because of our innate affinity to and interest in the other organisms with which we share our planet. They are, as he says, “the matrix in which the human mind originated and is permanently rooted.” To put it simply and metaphorically, our love for nature flows in our blood and is deeply engrained in both our psyche and cultural traditions. Our own personal awakenings to the natural world are as diverse as humanity itself. I spent my early childhood in rural Iowa where nature was an integral part of my life. My father and I spent many hours collecting, identifying and studying local insects, amphibians and reptiles. These experiences had a significant impact on my early intellectual and even spiritual development. One event I can recall most vividly. I had collected a cocoon in a field near my home in early spring. The large, silky capsule was attached to a stick. I brought the cocoon back to my room and placed it in a jar on top of my dresser. I remember waking one morning and, there, perched on the tip of the stick was a large moth, slowly moving its delicate, light green wings in the early morning sunlight. It took my breath away. To my inexperienced eyes, it was one of the most beautiful things I had ever seen. I knew it was a moth, but did not know which species. Upon closer examination, I noticed two moon-like markings on the wings and also noted that the wings had long “tails”, much like the ubiquitous tiger swallow-tail butterflies that visited the lilac bush in our backyard. Not wanting to suffer my ignorance any longer, I reached immediately for my Golden Guide to North American Insects and searched through the section on moths and butterflies. It was a luna moth! My heart was pounding with the excitement of new knowledge as I ran to share the discovery with my parents. I consider myself very fortunate to have made a living as a professional biologist and conservationist for the past 20 years. I’ve traveled to over 30 countries and six continents to study and photograph wildlife or to attend related conferences and meetings. Yet, each time I encounter a new and unusual animal or habitat my heart still races with the same excitement of my youth. If this is biophilia, then I certainly possess it, and it is my hope that others will experience it too. I am therefore extremely proud to have served as the series editor for the Gale Group’s rewrite of Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia, one of the best known and widely used reference works on the animal world. Grzimek’s is a celebration of animals, a snapshot of our current knowledge of the Earth’s incredible range of biological diversity. Although many other animal encyclopedias exist, Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia remains unparalleled in its size and in the breadth of topics and organisms it covers. The revision of these volumes could not come at a more opportune time. In fact, there is a desperate need for a deeper understanding and appreciation of our natural world. Many species are classified as threatened or endangered, and the situation is expected to get much worse before it gets better. Species extinction has always been part of the evolutionary history of life; some organisms adapt to changing circumstances and some do not. However, the current rate of species loss is now estimated to be 1,000–10,000 times the normal “background” rate of extinction since life began on Earth some 4 billion years ago. The primary factor responsible for this decline in biological diversity is the exponential growth of human populations, combined with peoples’ unsustainable appetite for natural resources, such as land, water, minerals, oil, and timber. The world’s human population now exceeds 6 billion, and even though the average birth rate has begun to decline, most demographers believe that the global human population will reach 8–10 billion in the next 50 years. Much of this projected growth will occur in developing countries in Central and South America, Asia and Africa-regions that are rich in unique biological diversity. viii Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia • • • • • Foreword Finding solutions to conservation challenges will not be easy in today’s human-dominated world. A growing number of people live in urban settings and are becoming increasingly isolated from nature. They “hunt” in super markets and malls, live in apartments and houses, spend their time watching television and searching the World Wide Web. Children and adults must be taught to value biological diversity and the habitats that support it. Education is of prime importance now while we still have time to respond to the impending crisis. There still exist in many parts of the world large numbers of biological “hotspots”-places that are relatively unaffected by humans and which still contain a rich store of their original animal and plant life. These living repositories, along with selected populations of animals and plants held in professionally managed zoos, aquariums and botanical gardens, could provide the basis for restoring the planet’s biological wealth and ecological health. This encyclopedia and the collective knowledge it represents can assist in educating people about animals and their ecological and cultural significance. Perhaps it will also assist others in making deeper connections to nature and spreading biophilia. Information on the conservation status, threats and efforts to preserve various species have been integrated into this revision. We have also included information on the cultural significance of animals, including their roles in art and religion. It was over 30 years ago that Dr. Bernhard Grzimek, then director of the Frankfurt Zoo in Frankfurt, Germany, edited the first edition of Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia. Dr. Grzimek was among the world’s best known zoo directors and conservationists. He was a prolific author, publishing nine books. Among his contributions were: Serengeti Shall Not Die, Rhinos Belong to Everybody and He and I and the Elephants. Dr. Grzimek’s career was remarkable. He was one of the first modern zoo or aquarium directors to understand the importance of zoo involvement in in situ conservation, that is, of their role in preserving wildlife in nature. During his tenure, Frankfurt Zoo became one of the leading western advocates and supporters of wildlife conservation in East Africa. Dr. Grzimek served as a Trustee of the National Parks Board of Uganda and Tanzania and assisted in the development of several protected areas. The film he made with his son Michael, Serengeti Shall Not Die, won the 1959 Oscar for best documentary. Professor Grzimek has recently been criticized by some for his failure to consider the human element in wildlife conservation. He once wrote: “A national park must remain a primordial wilderness to be effective. No men, not even native ones, should live inside its borders.” Such ideas, although considered politically incorrect by many, may in retrospect actually prove to be true. Human populations throughout Africa continue to grow exponentially, forcing wildlife into small islands of natural habitat surrounded by a sea of humanity. The illegal commercial bushmeat trade-the hunting of endangered wild animals for large scale human consumption-is pushing many species, including our closest relatives, the gorillas, bonobos and chimpanzees, to the brink of extinction. The trade is driven by widespread poverty and lack of economic alternatives. In order for some species to survive it will be necessary, as Grzimek suggested, to establish and enforce a system of protected areas where wildlife can roam free from exploitation of any kind. While it is clear that modern conservation must take the needs of both wildlife and people into consideration, what will the quality of human life be if the collective impact of shortterm economic decisions is allowed to drive wildlife populations into irreversible extinction? Many rural populations living in areas of high biodiversity are dependent on wild animals as their major source of protein. In addition, wildlife tourism is the primary source of foreign currency in many developing countries and is critical to their financial and social stability. When this source of protein and income is gone, what will become of the local people? The loss of species is not only a conservation disaster; it also has the potential to be a human tragedy of immense proportions. Protected areas, such as national parks, and regulated hunting in areas outside of parks are the only solutions. What critics do not realize is that the fate of wildlife and people in developing countries is closely intertwined. Forests and savannas emptied of wildlife will result in hungry, desperate people, and will, in the longterm lead to extreme poverty and social instability. Dr. Grzimek’s early contributions to conservation should be recognized, not only as benefiting wildlife, but as benefiting local people as well. Dr. Grzimek’s hope in publishing his Animal Life Encyclopedia was that it would “...disseminate knowledge of the animals and love for them”, so that future generations would “...have an opportunity to live together with the great diversity of these magnificent creatures.” As stated above, our goals in producing this updated and revised edition are similar. However, our challenges in producing this encyclopedia were more formidable. The volume of knowledge to be summarized is certainly much greater in the twenty-first century than it was in the 1970’s and 80’s. Scientists, both professional and amateur, have learned and published a great deal about the animal kingdom in the past three decades, and our understanding of biological and ecological theory has also progressed. Perhaps our greatest hurdle in producing this revision was to include the new information, while at the same time retaining some of the characteristics that have made Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia so popular. We have therefore strived to retain the series’ narrative style, while giving the information more organizational structure. Unlike the original Grzimek’s, this updated version organizes information under specific topic areas, such as reproduction, behavior, ecology and so forth. In addition, the basic organizational structure is generally consistent from one volume to the next, regardless of the animal groups covered. This should make it easier for users to locate information more quickly and efficiently. Like the original Grzimek’s, we have done our best to avoid any overly technical language that would make the work difficult to understand by non-biologists. When certain technical expressions were necessary, we have included explanations or clarifications. Considering the vast array of knowledge that such a work represents, it would be impossible for any one zoologist to have completed these volumes. We have therefore sought Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia ix Foreword specialists from various disciplines to write the sections with which they are most familiar. As with the original Grzimek’s, we have engaged the best scholars available to serve as topic editors, writers, and consultants. There were some complaints about inaccuracies in the original English version that may have been due to mistakes or misinterpretation during the complicated translation process. However, unlike the original Grzimek’s, which was translated from German, this revision has been completely re-written by English-speaking scientists. This work was truly a cooperative endeavor, and I thank all of those dedicated individuals who have written, edited, consulted, drawn, photographed, or contributed to its production in any way. The names of the topic editors, authors, and illustrators are presented in the list of contributors in each individual volume. The overall structure of this reference work is based on the classification of animals into naturally related groups, a discipline known as taxonomy or biosystematics. Taxonomy is the science through which various organisms are discovered, identified, described, named, classified and catalogued. It should be noted that in preparing this volume we adopted what might be termed a conservative approach, relying primarily on traditional animal classification schemes. Taxonomy has always been a volatile field, with frequent arguments over the naming of or evolutionary relationships between various organisms. The advent of DNA fingerprinting and other advanced biochemical techniques has revolutionized the field and, not unexpectedly, has produced both advances and confusion. In producing these volumes, we have consulted with specialists to obtain the most up-to-date information possible, but knowing that new findings may result in changes at any time. When scientific controversy over the classification of a particular animal or group of animals existed, we did our best to point this out in the text. Readers should note that it was impossible to include as much detail on some animal groups as was provided on others. For example, the marine and freshwater fish, with vast numbers of orders, families, and species, did not receive as detailed a treatment as did the birds and mammals. Due to practical and financial considerations, the publishers could provide only so much space for each animal group. In such cases, it was impossible to provide more than a broad overview and to feature a few selected examples for the purposes of illustration. To help compensate, we have provided a few key bibliographic references in each section to aid those interested in learning more. This is a common limitation in all reference works, but Grzimek’s Encyclopedia of Animal Life is still the most comprehensive work of its kind. I am indebted to the Gale Group, Inc. and Senior Editor Donna Olendorf for selecting me as Series Editor for this project. It was an honor to follow in the footsteps of Dr. Grzimek and to play a key role in the revision that still bears his name. Grzimek’s Animal Life Encyclopedia is being published by the Gale Group, Inc. in affiliation with my employer, the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA), and I would like to thank AZA Executive Director, Sydney J. Butler; AZA Past-President Ted Beattie (John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago, IL); and current AZA President, John Lewis (John Ball Zoological Garden, Grand Rapids, MI), for approving my participation. I would also like to thank AZA Conservation and Science Department Program Assistant, Michael Souza, for his assistance during the project. The AZA is a professional membership association, representing 205 accredited zoological parks and aquariums in North America. As Director/William Conway Chair, AZA Department of Conservation and Science, I feel that I am a philosophical descendant of Dr. Grzimek, whose many works I have collected and read. The zoo and aquarium profession has come a long way since the 1970s, due, in part, to innovative thinkers such as Dr. Grzimek. I hope this latest revision of his work will continue his extraordinary legacy. Silver Spring, Maryland, 2001 Michael Hutchins Series Editor


Grzimek S Animal Life Encyclopedia

Author by : Bernhard Grzimek
Languange : en
Publisher by : Gale / Cengage Learning
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 64
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Description : "This is a revised and updated edition of one of the most authoritative and comprehensive sources on the world's animals. Similar to the first edition written by noted zoologist Bernard Grzimek and published in 1972, the second edition covers all types of animals in geographic areas around the world. It includes high-quality photographs and illustrations and a comprehensive index to all volumes."--"The Top 20 Reference Titles of the Year," American Libraries, May 2004.


Grzimek S Animal Life Encyclopedia Mammals I V

Author by : Bernhard Grzimek
Languange : en
Publisher by : Gale / Cengage Learning
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Description : "This is a revised and updated edition of one of the most authoritative and comprehensive sources on the world's animals. Similar to the first edition written by noted zoologist Bernard Grzimek and published in 1972, the second edition covers all types of animals in geographic areas around the world. It includes high-quality photographs and illustrations and a comprehensive index to all volumes."--"The Top 20 Reference Titles of the Year," American Libraries, May 2004.


Grzimek S Animal Life Encyclopedia Birds I Iv

Author by : Bernhard Grzimek
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Description : Gale proudly presents the first completely revised and updated version of this acclaimed set in 30 years. Some reviewers call Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia the best reference work on animals ever published. Others call it the legacy left to us by fam


Grzimek S Animal Life Encyclopedia Lower Metazoans And Lesser Deuterosomes

Author by : Michael Hutchins
Languange : en
Publisher by : Gale / Cengage Learning
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Total Read : 11
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Description : "This is a revised and updated edition of one of the most authoritative and comprehensive sources on the world's animals. Similar to the first edition written by noted zoologist Bernard Grzimek and published in 1972, the second edition covers all types of animals in geographic areas around the world. It includes high-quality photographs and illustrations and a comprehensive index to all volumes."--"The Top 20 Reference Titles of the Year," American Libraries, May 2004.


Grzimek S Animal Life Encyclopedia Reptiles

Author by : Bernhard Grzimek
Languange : en
Publisher by : Gale / Cengage Learning
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Total Read : 32
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Description : "This is a revised and updated edition of one of the most authoritative and comprehensive sources on the world's animals. Similar to the first edition written by noted zoologist Bernard Grzimek and published in 1972, the second edition covers all types of animals in geographic areas around the world. It includes high-quality photographs and illustrations and a comprehensive index to all volumes."--"The Top 20 Reference Titles of the Year," American Libraries, May 2004.


Herpetology

Author by : Laurie J. Vitt
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Publisher by : Academic Press
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Description : The fourth edition of the textbook Herpetology covers the basic biology of amphibians and reptiles, with updates in nearly every conceptual area. Not only does it serve as a solid foundation for modern herpetology courses, but it is also relevant to courses in ecology, behavior, evolution, systematics, and morphology. Examples taken from amphibians and reptiles throughout the world make this book a useful herpetology textbook in several countries. Naturalists, amateur herpetologists, herpetoculturists, zoo professionals, and many others will find this book readable and full of relevant natural history and distributional information. Amphibians and reptiles have assumed a central role in research because of the diversity of ecological, physiological, morphological, behavioral, and evolutionary patterns they exhibit. This fully revised edition brings the latest research to the reader, ranging over topics in evolution, reproduction, behavior and more, allowing students and professionals to keep current with a quickly moving field. Heavily revised and updated with discussion of squamate (lizard and snake) taxonomy and new content reflected in current literature Includes increased focus on conservation biology in herpetology while retaining solid content on organismal biology of reptiles and amphibians Presents new photos included from authors' extensive library


Children S Books In Print 2007

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El Hi Textbooks Serials In Print 2005

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