In Defense Of Christian Hungary

Author by : Paul Hanebrink
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cornell University Press
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Description : In this important historical account of the role that religion played in defining the political life of a modern national society, Paul A. Hanebrink shows how Hungarian nationalists redefined Hungary—a liberal society in the nineteenth century—as a narrowly "Christian" nation in the aftermath of World War I. Drawing on impressive archival research, Hanebrink uncovers how political and religious leaders demanded that "Christian values" influence public life while insisting that religion should never be reduced to the status of a simple nationalist symbol. In Defense of Christian Hungary also explores the emergence of the idea that a destructive "Jewish spirit" was the national enemy. In combining the historical study of antisemitism with more recent considerations of religion and nationalism, Hanebrink addresses an important question in Central European historiography: how nations that had been inclusive of Jews before World War I became rabidly antisemitic during the interwar period. As he traces the crucial and complex legacy of religion's role in shaping exclusionary antisemitic politics in Hungary, Hanebrink follows the process from its origins in the 1890s to the Holocaust and beyond. More broadly, In Defense of Christian Hungary squarely addresses the relationship between antisemitic words and antisemitic violence and between religion and racial politics, deeply contested issues in the history of twentieth-century Europe. The Hungarian example is a chilling demonstration of how religious nationalism can find a home even within a pluralist and tolerant civil society.


In Defense Of Christian Hungary

Author by : Paul A. Hanebrink
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Description :


In Defense Of Christian Hungary

Author by : Paul A. Hanebrink
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Total Read : 65
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Fascist Interactions

Author by : David D. Roberts
Languange : en
Publisher by : Berghahn Books
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Total Read : 95
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Description : Although studies of fascism have constituted one of the most fertile areas of historical inquiry in recent decades, more and more scholars have called for a new agenda with more research beyond Italy and Germany, less preoccupation with definition and classification, and more sustained focus on the relationships among different fascist formations before 1945. Starting from a critical assessment of these imperatives, this rigorous volume charts a historiographical path that transcends rigid distinctions while still developing meaningful criteria of differentiation. Even as we take fascism seriously as a political phenomenon, such an approach allows us to better understand its distinctive contradictions and historical variations.


Exploring Christian Song

Author by : M. Jennifer Bloxam
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lexington Books
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Description : This essay collection celebrates the richness of Christian musical tradition across its two thousand year history and across the globe. Opening with a consideration of the fourth-century lamp-lighting hymn Phos hilaron and closing with reflections on contemporary efforts of Ghanaian composers to create Christian worship music in African idioms, the ten contributors engage with a broad ecumenical array of sacred music. Topics encompass Roman Catholic sacred music in medieval and Renaissance Europe, German Lutheran song in the eighteenth century, English hymnody in colonial America, Methodist hymnody adopted by Southern Baptists in the nineteenth century, and Genevan psalmody adapted to respond to the post-war tribulations of the Hungarian Reformed Church. The scope of the volume is further diversified by the inclusion of contemporary Christian topics that address the evangelical methods of a unique Orthodox Christian composer’s language, the shared aims and methods of African-American preaching and gospel music, and the affective didactic power of American evangelical “praise and worship” music. New material on several key composers, including Jacob Obrecht, J.S. Bach, George Philipp Telemann, C.P.E. Bach, Zoltan Kodály, and Arvo Pärt, appears within the book. Taken together, these essays embrace a stimulating variety of interdisciplinary analytical and methodological approaches, drawing on cultural, literary critical, theological, ritual, ethnographical, and media studies. The collection contributes to discussions of spirituality in music and, in particular, to the unifying aspects of Christian sacred music across time, space, and faith traditions. This collection celebrates the fifteenth anniversary of the Society for Christian Scholarship in Music.


Hungary In World War Ii

Author by : Deborah S. Cornelius
Languange : en
Publisher by : Fordham Univ Press
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Description : The story of Hungary's participation in World War II is part of a much larger narrative-one that has never before been fully recounted for a non-Hungarian readership. As told by Deborah Cornelius, it is a fascinating tale of rise and fall, of hopes dashed and dreams in tatters. Using previously untapped sources and interviews she conducted for this book, Cornelius provides a clear account of Hungary's attempt to regain the glory of the Hungarian Kingdom by joining forces with Nazi Germany-a decision that today seems doomed to fail from the start. For scholars and history buff s alike, Hungary in World War II is a riveting read.Cornelius begins her study with the Treaty of Trianon, which in 1920 spelled out the terms of defeat for the former kingdom. The new country of Hungary lost more than 70 percent of the kingdom's territory, saw its population reduced by nearly the same percentage, and was stripped of fi ve of its ten most populous cities. As Cornelius makes vividly clear, nearly all of the actions of Hungarian leaders during the succeedingdecades can be traced back to this incalculable defeat.In the early years of World War II, Hungary enjoyed boom times-and the dream of restoring the Hungarian Kingdom began to rise again. Caught in the middle as the war engulfed Europe, Hungary was drawn into an alliance with Nazi Germany. When the Germans appeared to give Hungary much of its pre-World War I territory, Hungarians began to delude themselves into believing they had won their long-sought objective. Instead, the final year of the world war brought widespread destruction and a genocidal war against Hungarian Jews. Caught between two warring behemoths, the country became a battleground for German and Soviet forces. In the wake of the war, Hungary suffered further devastation under Soviet occupation and forty-five years of communist rule.The author first became interested in Hungary in 1957 and has visited the country numerous times, beginning in the 1970s. Over the years she has talked with many Hungarians, both scholars and everyday people. Hungary in World War II draws skillfully on these personal tales to narrate events before, during, and after World War II. It provides a comprehensive and highly readable history of Hungarian participation in the war, along with an explanation of Hungarian motivation: the attempt of a defeated nation to relive its former triumphs.


The Mighty And The Almighty

Author by : Nick Spencer
Languange : en
Publisher by : Biteback Publishing
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Description : For a secular age, we have a lot of religious politicians. Theresa May, Vladimir Putin, Angela Merkel, even Donald Trump all profess Christianity, as did Obama, Brown, Sarkozy, Bush and Blair before them. Indeed, it is striking how many Christian Presidents and Prime Ministers have assumed the global stage over recent years. In spite of Alastair Campbell's oft- (and mis-) quoted line, 'We don't do God', it seems like we definitely do. But how sincere is this faith? Is not much of it simply window-dressing for the electorate, paste-on haloes to calm the moral majority? Conversely, how dangerous is it? If we elect our politicians to do our democratic will, do we really want them praying to God for advice? The Mighty and the Almighty looks at some of the biggest political figures of the past forty years - from Thatcher and Reagan, through Mandela and Clinton, to May and Trump - and looks at how they 'did God'. Did their faith actually shape their politics, and if so, how? Or did their politics shape their faith? And does it matter if it did? In an age when religion is more important on the global stage than anyone would have predicted fifty years ago, this book will tell you everything you want to know, and some things you won't, about how the Mighty get on with the Almighty.


Christian Democracy And The Fall Of Communism

Author by : Michael Gehler
Languange : en
Publisher by : Leuven University Press
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Description : Debates on the role of Christian Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe too often remain strongly tied to national historiographies. With the edited collection the contributing authors aim to reconstruct Christian Democracy’s role in the fall of Communism from a bird's-eye perspective by covering the entire region and by taking “third-way” options in the broader political imaginary of late-Cold War Europe into account. The book’s twelve chapters present the most recent insights on this topic and connect scholarship on the Iron Curtain’s collapse with scholarship on political Catholicism. Christian Democracy and the Fall of Communism offers the reader a two-fold perspective. The first approach examines the efforts undertaken by Western European actors who wanted to foster or support Christian Democratic initiatives in Central and Eastern Europe. The second approach is devoted to the (re-)emergence of homegrown Christian Democratic formations in the 1980s and 1990s. One of the volume’s seminal contributions lies in its documentation of the decisive role that Christian Democracy played in supporting the political and anti-political forces that engineered the collapse of Communism from within between 1989 and 1991.


The Pope S Dilemma

Author by : Jacques Kornberg
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Toronto Press
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Description : A meticulous and careful analysis of the career of the twentieth century's most controversial pope, The Pope's Dilemma argues that Pius XII's refusal to condemn Nazi Germany and its allies was driven by the desire to keep Catholics within the Church.


Hungarian Religion Romanian Blood

Author by : R. Chris Davis
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Wisconsin Press
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Total Read : 69
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Description : Amid the rising nationalism and racial politics that culminated in World War II, European countries wishing to "purify" their nations often forced unwanted populations to migrate. The targeted minorities had few options, but as R. Chris Davis shows, they sometimes used creative tactics to fight back, redefining their identities to serve their own interests. Davis's highly illuminating example is the case of the little-known Moldavian Csangos, a Hungarian- and Romanian-speaking community of Roman Catholics in eastern Romania. During World War II, some in the Romanian government wanted to expel them. The Hungarian government saw them as Hungarians and wanted to settle them on lands confiscated from other groups. Resisting deportation, the clergy of the Csangos enlisted Romania's leading racial anthropologist, collected blood samples, and rewrote a millennium of history to claim Romanian origins and national belonging—thus escaping the discrimination and violence that devastated so many of Europe's Jews, Roma, Slavs, and other minorities. In telling their story, Davis offers fresh insight to debates about ethnic allegiances, the roles of science and religion in shaping identity, and minority politics past and present.


The Waning Of Emancipation

Author by : Guy Miron
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wayne State University Press
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Description : Explores the role of public memory and images of the past in the Jewish communities of Germany, France, and Hungary as they faced changing political and social conditions.


Catholicism And Fascism In Europe 1918 1945

Author by : Jan Nelis
Languange : en
Publisher by : Georg Olms Verlag
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Total Read : 44
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Description : Die im vorliegenden Band versammelten Aufsätze analysieren die vielfältige Art und Weise, wie der Vatikan, die nationalen Kirchen und einzelne Katholiken mit dem Aufstieg der extremen Rechten in Europa während der 1920er, 1930er und frühen 1940er Jahre umgingen, vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs, der mit Recht als einer der wichtigsten Katalysatoren des europäischen Faschismus in der Zwischenkriegszeit gilt, bis zum Schluss und zu den unmittelbaren Nachwirkungen des Zweiten Weltkriegs. Während einige Aufsätze sich auf theoretische, methodologische Probleme konzentrieren, beschäftigen sich die meisten Beiträge mit jeweils einem Land oder einer Region, wo eine faschistische Bewegung oder ein solches Regime zwischen den Kriegen und während des Zweiten Weltkriegs erfolgreich war, und wo es gleichzeitig eine signifikante katholische Präsenz in der Gesellschaft gab. Fast ganz Europa wird behandelt – ein beispielloses Unternehmen - , und eine große Zahl wichtiger Kontexte und Methoden wird untersucht. So wirken die Beiträge mit an der allgemeinen Entwicklung eines interpretativen ‚Cluster‘-Modells, das eine Reihe von Grundmustern der Forschung vereinigt und zukünftige Untersuchungen anregen wird. The papers presented in this volume analyse the many ways in which the Vatican, national Churches and individual catholics dealt with the rise of the extreme right in Europe throughout the 1920s, 1930s and early 1940s, from the end of the First World War, arguably one of the main catalysts of European interwar fascism, to the conclusion and immediate aftermath of the Second World War. While a number of papers focus primarily on theoretical, methodological issues pertaining to the book’s general theme, the majority of papers focus on either a country or region where a fascist movement or regime flourished between the wars and during the Second World War, and where there was a significant catholic presence in society. The various chapters cover almost the entire European continent – an endeavour that is unprecedented –, and they explore a wide range of relevant contexts and methodologies, thus further contributing to the general development of an interpretive ‘cluster’ model that incorporates a series of investigative matrixes, and that will hopefully inspire future research.


Borders On The Move

Author by : Leslie Waters
Languange : en
Publisher by : Boydell & Brewer
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Total Read : 43
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Description : An examination of territorial changes between Czechoslovakia and Hungary and their effects on the local populations of the borderlands in the World War II era


Great Expectations And Interwar Realities

Author by : Zsolt Nagy
Languange : en
Publisher by : Central European University Press
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Total Read : 9
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Description : After the shock of the 1920 Treaty of Trianon, which Hungarians perceived as an unfair dictate, the leaders of the country found it imperative to change Hungary’s international image in a way that would help the revision of the post-World War I settlement. The monograph examines the development of interwar Hungarian cultural diplomacy in three areas: universities, the tourist industry, and the media—primarily motion pictures and radio production. It is a story of the Hungarian elites’ high hopes and deep-seated anxieties about the country’s place in a Europe newly reconstructed after World War I, and how these elites perceived and misperceived themselves, their surroundings, and their own ability to affect the country’s fate. The defeat in the Great War was crushing, but it was also stimulating, as Nagy documents in his examination of foreign language journals, tourism, radio, and other tools of cultural diplomacy. The mobilization of diverse cultural and intellectual resources, the author argues, helped establish Hungary’s legitimacy in the international arena, contributed to the modernization of the country, and established a set of enduring national images. Though the study is rooted in Hungary, it explores the dynamic and contingent relationship between identity construction and transnational cultural and political currents in East-Central European nations in the interwar period.


Christianity And Modernity In Eastern Europe

Author by : Bruce R. Berglund
Languange : en
Publisher by : Central European University Press
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Total Read : 15
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Description : Religious history more generally has experienced an exciting revival over the past few years, with new methodological and theoretical approaches invigorating the field. The time has definitely come for this “new religious history” to arrive in Eastern Europe. This book explores the influence of the Christian churches in Eastern Europe's social, cultural, and political history. Drawing upon archival sources, the work fills a vacuum as few scholars have systematically explored the history of Christianity in the region. The result of a three-year project, this collective work challenges readers with questions like: Is secularization a useful concept in understanding the long-term dynamics of religiosity in Eastern Europe? Is the picture of oppression and resistance an accurate way to characterize religious life under communism, or did Christians and communists find ways to co-exist on the local level prior to 1989? And what role did Christians actually play in dissident movements under communism? Perhaps most important is the question: what does the study of Eastern Europe contribute to the broader study of modern Christian history, and what can we learn from the interpretative problems that arise, uniquely, from this region?


Hungarian Women S Activism In The Wake Of The First World War

Author by : Judith Szapor
Languange : en
Publisher by : Bloomsbury Publishing
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Description : Using a wide range of previously unpublished archival, written, and visual sources, Hungarian Women's Activism in the Wake of the First World War offers the first gendered history of the aftermath of the First World War in Hungary. The book examines women's activism during the post-war revolutions and counter-revolution. It describes the dynamic of the period's competing, liberal, Christian-conservative, socialist, radical socialist, and right-wing nationalistic women's movements and pays special attention to women activists of the Right. In this original study, Judith Szapor goes on to convincingly argue that illiberal ideas on family and gender roles, tied to the nation's regeneration and tightly woven into the fabric of the interwar period's right-wing, extreme nationalistic ideology, greatly contributed to the success of Miklós Horthy's regime. Furthermore the book looks at the long shadow that anti-liberal, nationalist notions of gender and family cast on Hungarian society and provides an explanation for their persistent appeal in the post-Communist era. This is an important text for anyone interested in women's history, gender history and Hungary in the 20th century.


Jewish Responses To Persecution

Author by : Emil Kerenji
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
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Total Read : 15
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Description : With its unique combination of primary sources and historical narrative, this volume offers an important perspective on the peak years of the Nazi “Final Solution,” when the Jewish struggle for survival became increasingly desperate. The rich set of documents captures the cultural, political, and economic diversity of European Jewry under assault.


Jews Nazis And The Cinema Of Hungary

Author by : David Frey
Languange : en
Publisher by : Bloomsbury Publishing
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Total Read : 75
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Description : Between 1929 and 1942, Hungary's motion picture industry experienced meteoric growth. It leapt into Europe's top echelon, trailing only Nazi Germany and Italy in feature output. Yet by 1944, Hungary's cinema was in shambles, internal and external forces having destroyed its unification experiments and productive capacity. This original cultural and political history examines the birth, unexpected ascendance, and wartime collapse of Hungary's early sound cinema by placing it within a complex international nexus. Detailing the interplay of Hungarian cultural and political elites, Jewish film professionals and financiers, Nazi officials, and global film moguls, David Frey demonstrates how the transnational process of forging an industry designed to define a national culture proved particularly contentious and surprisingly contradictory in the heyday of racial nationalism and antisemitism.


The Holocaust In Hungary

Author by : Zoltán Vági
Languange : en
Publisher by : AltaMira Press
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Description : The Holocaust in Hungary provides a comprehensive documentary account of one of the most brutal and effective killing campaigns in history. After Nazi Germany took control of Hungary late in World War II, Jews were rounded up with unprecedented speed and sent directly to Auschwitz. They would form the largest group of victims who perished in that camp. The complex interplay between German and Hungarian actors brought about the annihilation of a once-thriving Jewish community and the murder of hundreds of thousands of Jewish men, women, and children. The authors present extensive reports, testimonies, and other primary sources of these events accompanied by in-depth commentary that spans the years from the late 1930s to the fractured political landscape of postwar Hungary.


Re Inventing Western Civilisation

Author by : Hagen Schulz-Forberg
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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Total Read : 45
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Description : The volume shows that neoliberalism concerns a tradition carried by a network of people, who understood themselves as liberals (and at times as neoliberals) and who sought to create societies based on individual freedom and a free market economy. It also shows that neoliberalism emerged as a transnational and multilingual phenomenon and that it cannot be reduced to one doctrine or practice. The book will enrich the reader’s knowledge of the political-ideological landscapes and developments in various European regions and countries, in addition to transforming the overall picture of European (neo)liberalisms in the twentieth century.


The Coming Of The Holocaust

Author by : Peter Kenez
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
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Description : The Coming of the Holocaust aims to help readers understand the circumstances that made the Holocaust possible. Peter Kenez demonstrates that the occurrence of the Holocaust was not predetermined as a result of modern history but instead was the result of contingencies. He shows that three preconditions had to exist for the genocide to take place: modern anti-Semitism, meaning Jews had to become economically and culturally successful in the post-French Revolution world to arouse fear rather than contempt; an extremist group possessing a deeply held, irrational, and profoundly inhumane worldview had to take control of the machinery of a powerful modern state; and the context of a major war with mass killings. The book also discusses the correlations between social and historical differences in individual countries regarding the success of the Germans in their effort to exterminate Jews.


Human Rights In The Twentieth Century

Author by : Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
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Total Read : 26
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Description : Has there always been an inalienable 'right to have rights' as part of the human condition, as Hannah Arendt famously argued? The contributions to this volume examine how human rights came to define the bounds of universal morality in the course of the political crises and conflicts of the twentieth century. Although human rights are often viewed as a self-evident outcome of this history, the essays collected here make clear that human rights are a relatively recent invention that emerged in contingent and contradictory ways. Focusing on specific instances of their assertion or violation during the past century, this volume analyzes the place of human rights in various arenas of global politics, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented. In doing so, this volume captures the state of the art in a field that historians have only recently begun to explore.


Europe On The Move

Author by : Peter Gatrell
Languange : en
Publisher by : Manchester University Press
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Total Read : 53
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Description : Europe on the move is the first book to address the dramatic and poignant refugee crisis that erupted during the First World War and that enveloped the entire continent. Written by specialists in the field it will appeal to all those who are interested in the era of the First World War and in Europe’s first major refugee crisis.


Encyclopedia Of Global Religion

Author by : Mark Juergensmeyer
Languange : en
Publisher by : SAGE
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 29
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Description : Presents entries A to L of a two-volume encyclopedia discussing religion around the globe, including biographies, concepts and theories, places, social issues, movements, texts, and traditions.


A Specter Haunting Europe

Author by : Paul Hanebrink
Languange : en
Publisher by : Harvard University Press
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Total Read : 12
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Description : In the 20th century, Europe was haunted by a specter of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. Fear of a Jewish Bolshevik plot to destroy the nations of Europe took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across the continent. Paul Hanebrink shows that the myth of ethno-religious threat is still alive today, in Westerners’ fear of Muslims.


How It Happened

Author by : Ernő Munkácsi
Languange : en
Publisher by : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Total Read : 92
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Description : A gripping first-hand account of the devastating "last chapter" of the Holocaust, written by a privileged eyewitness, the secretary of the Hungarian Judenrat, and a member of Budapest's Jewish elite, How It Happened is a unique testament to the senseless brutality that, in a matter of months, decimated what was Europe’s largest and last-surviving Jewish community. Writing immediately after the war and examining only those critical months of 1944 when Hitler's Germany occupied its ally Hungary, Ernő Munkácsi describes the Judenrat's desperation and fear as it attempted to prevent the looming catastrophe, agonized over decisions not made, and struggled to grasp the immensity of a tragedy that would take the lives of 427,000 Hungarian Jews in the very last year of the Second World War. This long-overdue translation makes available Munkácsi's profound and unparalleled insight into the Holocaust in Hungary, revealing the "choiceless choices" that confronted members of the Judenrat forced to execute the Nazis' orders. With an in-depth introduction, a brief biography of Ernő Munkácsi, ample annotations by László Csősz and Ferenc Laczó, two dozen archival photographs, and detailed maps, How It Happened is an essential resource for historians and students of the Holocaust, the Second World War, and Central Europe.


Freedom Of Religion Secularism And Human Rights

Author by : Nehal Bhuta
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 64
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Description : This interdisciplinary volume examines the relationship between secularism, freedom of religion and human rights in legal, theoretical, historical and political perspective. It brings together chapters from leading scholars of human rights, law and religion, political theory, religious studies and history, and provides insights into the state of the debate about the relationship between these concepts. Comparative in orientation, its chapters draw on constitutional and political discourses and experience not only from Western Europe and the United States, but also from India, the Arab world, and Malaysia.


Everyday Nationalism In Hungary

Author by : Alexander Maxwell
Languange : en
Publisher by : Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
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Total Read : 55
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Description : This book examines Hungarian nationalism through everyday practices that will strike most readers as things that seem an unlikely venue for national politics. Separate chapters examine nationalized tobacco, nationalized wine, nationalized moustaches, nationalized sexuality, and nationalized clothing. These practices had other economic, social or gendered meanings: moustaches were associated with manliness, wine with aristocracy, and so forth. The nationalization of everyday practices thus sheds light on how patriots imagined the nation’s economic, social, and gender composition. Nineteenth-century Hungary thus serves as the case study in the politics of "everyday nationalism." The book discusses several prominent names in Hungarian history, but in unfamiliar contexts. The book also engages with theoretical debates on nationalism, discussing several key theorists. Various chapters specifically examine how historical actors imagine relationship between the nation and the state, paying particular attention Rogers Brubaker’s constructivist approach to nationalism without groups, Michael Billig’s notion of ‘banal nationalism,’ Carole Pateman’s ideas about the nation as a ‘national brotherhood’, and Tara Zahra’s notion of ‘national indifference.’


Right Wing Politics And The Rise Of Antisemitism In Europe 1935 1941

Author by : Frank Bajohr
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wallstein Verlag
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 26
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Description : A New Forum for International Holocaust Research. European Holocaust Studies (EHS) publishes key international research results on the murder of the European Jews and its wider contexts. This new English-language yearbook primarily aims to bring together and provide higher visibility to research contributions produced across different countries and institutions. It also strives to promote international exchange, especially among scholars from North America, Europe, and Israel. The EHS issues are thematic. Each issue features a selection of peer-reviewed research articles, which offer novel perspectives on the main theme. Further sections include a discussion of key documents and a selection of research project descriptions related to the overall topic, as well as a literature review or essay dealing with historiographical debates on the subject.


A History Of The Hungarian Constitution

Author by : Ferenc Hörcher
Languange : en
Publisher by : Bloomsbury Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 48
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Description : The new Hungarian Basic Law, which was ratified on 1 January 2012, provoked domestic and international controversy. Of particular concern was the constitutional text's explicit claim that it was situated within a reinvigorated Hungarian legal tradition that had allegedly developed over centuries before its violent interruption during World War II, by German invaders, and later, by Soviet occupation. To explore the context and validity of this claim, and the legal traditions which have informed the stormy centuries of Hungary's constitutional development, this book brings together a group of leading historians, political scientists and legal scholars to produce a comprehensive history of Hungarian constitutional thought. Ranging in scope from an overview of Hungarian medieval jurisprudence to an assessment of the various criticisms levelled at the new Hungarian Basis Law of 2012, contributors assess the constitutions, their impacts and their legacies, as well as the social and cultural contexts within which they were drafted. The historical analysis is accompanied by a selection of original source materials, many translated here for the first time. This is the only book in English on the subject and is essential reading for all those interested in Hungary's history, political culture and constitution.