The Potawatomis

Author by : R. David Edmunds
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
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Description : The Potawatomi Indians were the dominant tribe in the region of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and southern Michigan during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Active participants in the fur trade, and close friends with many French fur traders and government leaders, the Potawatomis remained loyal to New France throughout the colonial period, resisting the lure of the inexpensive British trade goods that enticed some of their neighbors into alliances with the British. During the colonial wars Potawatomi warriors journeyed far to the south and east to fight alongside their French allies against Braddock in Pennsylvania and other British forces in New York. As French fortunes in the Old Northwest declined, the Potawatomis reluctantly shifted their allegiance to the British Crown, fighting against the Americans during the Revolution, during Tecumseh’s uprising, and during the War of 1812. The advancing tide of white settlement in the Potawatomi lands after the wars brought many problems for the tribe. Resisting attempts to convert them into farmers, they took on the life-style of their old friends, the French traders. Raids into western territories by more warlike members of the tribe brought strong military reaction from the United States government and from white settlers in the new territories. Finally, after great pressure by government officials, the Potawatomis were forced to cede their homelands to the United States in exchange for government annuities. Although many of the treaties were fraudulent, government agents forced the tribe to move west of the Mississippi, often with much turmoil and suffering. This volume, the first scholarly history of the Potawatomis and their influence in the Old Northwest, is an important contribution to American Indian history. Many of the tribe’s leaders, long forgotten, such as Main Poc, Siggenauk, Onanghisse, Five Medals, and Billy Caldwell, played key roles in the development of Indian-white relations in the Great Lakes region. The Potawatomi experience also sheds light on the development of later United States policy toward Indians of many other tribes.


The Captive S Quest For Freedom

Author by : R. J. M. Blackett
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 81
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Description : Examines the impact fugitive slaves had on the Fugitive Slave Law and the coming of the American Civil War.


Building For The Centuries

Author by : John H. Keiser
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 21
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Description :


Instant Cities

Author by : Gunther Paul Barth
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press on Demand
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 57
Total Download : 450
File Size : 53,8 Mb
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Description : A reprint of the Oxford U. Press edition of 1975 with a new introduction (20 p.). Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


The Civil War In North Carolina

Author by : John G. Barrett
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNC Press Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 81
Total Download : 503
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Description : Eleven battles and seventy-three skirmishes were fought in North Carolina during the Civil War. Although the number of men involved in many of these engagements was comparatively small, the campaigns and battles themselves were crucial in the grand strategy of the conflict and involved some of the most famous generals of the war. John Barrett presents the complete story of military engagements across the state, including the classical pitched battle of Bentonville, the siege of Fort Fisher, the amphibious campaigns on the coast, and cavalry sweeps such as Stoneman's raid. From and through North Carolina, men and supplies went to Lee's army in Virginia, making the Tar Heel state critical to Lee's ability to remain in the field during the closing months of the war, when the Union had cut off the West and Gulf South. This dependence upon North Carolina led to Stoneman's cavalry raid and Sherman's march through the state in 1865, the latter of which brought the horrors of total war and eventual defeat.


The Mexican War 1846 1848

Author by : Karl Jack Bauer
Languange : en
Publisher by : U of Nebraska Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 77
Total Download : 275
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Description : "Much has been written about the Mexican war, but this . . . is the best military history of that conflict. . . . Leading personalities, civilian and military, Mexican and American, are given incisive and fair evaluations. The coming of war is seen as unavoidable, given American expansion and Mexican resistance to loss of territory, compounded by the fact that neither side understood the other. The events that led to war are described with reference to military strengths and weaknesses, and every military campaign and engagement is explained in clear detail and illustrated with good maps. . . . Problems of large numbers of untrained volunteers, discipline and desertion, logistics, diseases and sanitation, relations with Mexican civilians in occupied territory, and Mexican guerrilla operations are all explained, as are the negotiations which led to war's end and the Mexican cession. . . . This is an outstanding contribution to military history and a model of writing which will be admired and emulated."-Journal of American History. K. Jack Bauer was also the author of Zachary Taylor: Soldier, Planter, Statesman of the Old Southwest (1985) and Other Works. Robert W. Johannsen, who introduces this Bison Books edition of The Mexican War, is a professor of history at the University of Illinois, Urbana, and the author of To the Halls of Montezumas: The Mexican War in the American Imagination (1985).


The First Lincoln Campaign

Author by : Reinhard Henry Luthin
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Total Read : 83
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Description :


Writings On American History

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 80
Total Download : 937
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Description :


La Famille De Vidrine At 275 Years

Author by : Rev. Jason Vidrine
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lulu.com
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 83
Total Download : 981
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Description : Reflections about the Vidrine Family throughout the course of its 275 year history in Louisiana


Hired Hands And Plowboys

Author by : David E. Schob
Languange : en
Publisher by : Urbana : University of Illinois Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 48
Total Download : 691
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Description : Before the Civil War, the livelihood of most Americans was involved in some way with farming. Yet, because of a lack of readily available information on workers, farm labor has long been neglected by historians. Filing a major gap in the history of American agriculture, labor, and the frontier, David Schob studies this distinctive aspect of American life in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota from 1815 to 1860. Through hundreds of details drawn from farmers' records, diaries and letters, county histories, newspapers, and periodicals, Schob evokes the farm laborer as he broke prairies, harvested grain, drained ditches, dug wells, and worked during off-season winter months logging, sawmilling, and pork packing. Farm work varied with the season and with the ethnic background of the hired hands, each group of immigrants introducing its specialized tasks to the region--the Irish as ditchdiggers and trenchers, the Germans as horticulturists, and the Scandinavians as wood choppers. Together, these groups not only contributed to the economic development of the Midwest, but according to Schob, they also accelerated the westward movement of the American frontier. In addition to providing detailed accounts of the workers' duties and way of life, and information on wages, contracts, and working conditions for routine farm employment, the book sheds light on several previously ignored facets of agricultural and labor history: the work of chore boys and hired girls, whose services were equally important to industrious farmers, and the role of free black farm hands, who augmented the white labor force in the harvest fields and the hazardous work of well digging.


Mental Institutions In America

Author by : Gerald N. Grob
Languange : en
Publisher by : Transaction Publishers
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Total Read : 50
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Description : Mental Institutions in America: Social Policy to 1875 examines how American society responded to complex problems arising out of mental illness in the nineteenth century. All societies have had to confront sickness, disease, and dependency, and have developed their own ways of dealing with these phenomena. The mental hospital became the characteristic institution charged with the responsibility of providing care and treatment for individuals seemingly incapable of caring for themselves during protracted periods of incapacitation. The services rendered by the hospital were of benefit not merely to the afflicted individual but to the community. Such an institution embodied a series of moral imperatives by providing humane and scientific treatment of disabled individuals, many of whose families were unable to care for them at home or to pay the high costs of private institutional care. Yet the mental hospital has always been more than simply an institution that offered care and treatment for the sick and disabled. Its structure and functions have usually been linked with a variety of external economic, political, social, and intellectual forces, if only because the way in which a society handled problems of disease and dependency was partly governed by its social structure and values. The definition of disease, the criteria for institutionalization, the financial and administrative structures governing hospitals, the nature of the decision-making process, differential care and treatment of various socio-economic groups were issues that transcended strictly medical and scientific considerations. Mental Institutions in America attempts to interpret the mental hospital as a social as well as a medical institution and to illuminate the evolution of policy toward dependent groups such as the mentally ill. This classic text brilliantly studies the past in depth and on its own terms.


Geological Survey Bulletin

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 24
Total Download : 226
File Size : 54,9 Mb
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Description :


Railroad Labor Disputes

Author by : Gerald G. Eggert
Languange : en
Publisher by : Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 34
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File Size : 49,7 Mb
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Description : At Martinsburg, West Virginia, on July 16, 1877, angry laborers struck the B & O Railroad because of a 10 percent wage cut. Spontaneous strikes soon choked railroad service from Baltimore to St. Louis and from Buffalo to Louisville. The violent wave of discontent developed into the country's first national labor crisis. The use of federal troops to restore order was only one of many decisions--sometimes blundering or biased, sometimes enlightened--the government would make during the next twenty years in coping with railway strikes. Not until the defeat of the Pullman Strike in 1894 did railway labor disorders subside. Railroad Labor Disputes describes the federal government's methods of dealing with railroad labor problems in the last quarter of the nineteenth century and shows how the beginnings of federal strike policy evolved. To explain the bias of government officials against the working man and for railroad management, Gerald Eggert examines the backgrounds, interests, and ambitions of the shapers of federal policy. Eggert also underscores the lack of congressional leadership and the erratic planning of the executive branch, which compelled the federal courts to play a large part in making policy. Particularly in times of crisis, accident and chance determined the policy as much as reason and forethought. Occasionally decisions supported strikers, but policy became increasingly anti-labor in its bias. "Riots" and "insurrections" were quelled by troops; "conspiring to obstruct the mails" justified federal strikebreaking; hampering interstate commerce produced federal reprisal. Court injunctions were first used to protect railroads in receivership, later any railroad at any time. Strikes were even judged violations of the Sherman Antitrust Act. After the Pullman strike of 1894, government policy grew more reasonable. Eggert emphasizes that the Erdman Act reflected this trend. Thereafter, railroad officials increasingly accepted the principle of collective bar


The French American Review

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 20
Total Download : 134
File Size : 49,9 Mb
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Description :


The Filson Club History Quarterly

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 63
Total Download : 503
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Description : Includes list of members.


Journal Of The History Of Ideas

Author by : Anonim
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 81
Total Download : 186
File Size : 53,5 Mb
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Description : An international quarterly devoted to intellectual history.