Community Safety

Author by : New Zealand. Law Commission
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 55
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File Size : 50,9 Mb
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Crime And Mental Disorders

Author by : Denise Gosselin
Languange : en
Publisher by : West Academic Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 639
File Size : 47,8 Mb
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Mental Disorder In The Criminal Justice System

Author by : J. S. Wormith
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 65
Total Download : 620
File Size : 49,7 Mb
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Description : Presents a comprehensive schematic overview of the mentally disorderedoffender and how he is processed in Canada in order to identify the issuesand put each component in its criminal justice and mental health context. Issues addressed include public sentiment, accommodation and treatment, client consent, dangerousness and legislative policy. The report alsodiscusses the social aspects of the rehabilitative model for offendersconsidered mentally disordered and how the institutionalizing (correctionalor pyschiatric) process fails them. Lastly, the report discusses specifictypes of mental disorders that by law require voluntary participation only onthe part of the offender and how the incarceration system of rehabilitationis insufficient.


Crime And Mental Disorders The Criminal Justice Response 2d

Author by : DENISE KINDSCHI. GOSSELIN
Languange : en
Publisher by : West Academic Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 58
Total Download : 300
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Description : The second edition of Crime and Mental Disorders is revised and reorganized to illustrate diversion and reentry opportunities for justice involved individuals who suffer from mental disorders. Priorities are informed by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, on evidence-based practices, and includes the application of the Sequential Intercept Model (SIM) to both adults and juveniles. This essential text from Denise Kindschi Gosselin is appropriate for both graduate and undergraduate courses. Broadly addressing psychiatric disorders, it is written to promote collaboration between the disciplines of criminal justice and mental health. A must-read text for any student or professional concerned with issues involving individuals living with mental disorders who come to the attention of the justice system. Organized into five sections, Crime and Mental Disorders -- Part I UNDERSTANDING MENTAL ILLNESS covers an introduction to the history of mental illness, the response history in the U.S. and an overview of issues which arise in calls for service involving individuals who have mental disorders. Part II THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE examines justice intervention which include diversion intercepts, system collaboration, and civil commitment. Part III CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESPONSES looks at law and policy which influence decision making in the three branches of criminal justice: law enforcement, the criminal court and corrections. Part IV ALTERNATIVES TO INCARCERATION reflects recent changes to reentry and community corrections. The juvenile justice chapter deals with the risks and responses to youth in the justice system who have mental health disorders. Part V MENTAL ORDERS IN CONTEXT contains a chapter on global perspectives and one which explains the diagnostic systems and disorders of individuals commonly associated with criminal justice intervention. Thought-provoking questions and an end of chapter review facilitate class discussion. "In My Experience" questions draw upon the author's career as a Massachusetts state trooper.


People With Mental Illness In The Criminal Justice System

Author by : Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry
Languange : en
Publisher by : American Psychiatric Pub
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 43
Total Download : 215
File Size : 41,9 Mb
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Description : Written by a committee of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, People With Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System: Answering a Cry for Help represents the collective wisdom of leaders in community psychiatry and is the third in a series of successful publications that have used Dear Abby letters as source material. The letters, submitted by readers with experience with mental illness and the criminal justice system, constitute a rich, real-world repository for the case stories presented in this fascinating volume. Using the experiences shared in the letters, the authors employ the Sequential Intercept Model to present a series of chapters offering detailed recommendations for psychiatrists, group practices, and criminal justice entities on partnering with individuals who are at risk and their families, with the goal of improving outcomes. The book's many features and functions make it relevant to a diverse audience: The Dear Abby letters on which the book's stories are based are heartfelt and human, providing a depth of emotion and understanding that cannot be found elsewhere, and the down-to-earth writing style and real-world material are designed to be useful and compelling to both practitioner and layperson. The case-based recommendations for effective interventions are very specific and practical to promote and enhance clinical skill development. A robust set of appendices presents information for professionals on a variety of critically important topics, including principles for criminal justice and community psychiatry; sequential intercept mapping; stages of engagement with the criminal justice system; HIPAA regulations; screening and mental status/criminal justice history; essential systems of care; and the risk-need-responsivity model. An extensive section of criminal justice/mental health online resources addresses areas such as law enforcement, courts, corrections, evidence-based practices, veterans, organizations, and miscellaneous topics, providing avenues of information and assistance for individuals, families, and clinicians. This simple, evidence-based guide challenges psychiatrists to initiate changes in their clinical work; in the operation of their agencies, programs, and teams; and in their partnerships with local criminal justice and behavioral health providers to positively impact people with behavioral health conditions in the criminal justice system. Implementing the approaches described so eloquently in People With Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System: Answering a Cry for Help can potentially reduce the overrepresentation of people with mental illnesses in justice settings, provide alternatives to incarceration, and divert individuals who do not pose a public safety risk from jail.


The Role Of Mental Illness In Criminal Trials The Insanity Defense

Author by : Jane Campbell Moriarty
Languange : en
Publisher by : Taylor & Francis
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 73
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File Size : 48,9 Mb
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Description : While white racism has global dimensions, it has an unshakeable lease on life in South African political organizations and its educational system. Donnarae MacCann and Yulisa Maddy here provide a thorough and provocative analysis of South African children's literature during the key decade around Nelson Mandela's release from prison. Their research demonstrates that the literature of this period was derived from the same milieu -- intellectual, educational, religious, political, and economic -- that brought white supremacy to South Africa during colonial times. This volume is a signal contribution to the study of children's literature and its relation to racism and social conditions.


Criminal Justice And Mental Health

Author by : Jada Hector
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 37
Total Download : 381
File Size : 51,5 Mb
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Description : This textbook provides an overview for students in Criminology and Criminal Justice about the overlap between the criminal justice system and mental health. It provides an accessible overview of basic signs and symptoms of major mental illnesses and size of scope of justice-involved individuals with mental illness. In the United States, the criminal justice system is often the first public service to be in contact with individuals suffering from mental illness or in mental distress. Those with untreated mental illnesses are often at higher risk for committing criminal acts, yet research on this population continues to shed light on common myths – such a prevailing assumption that those with mental illness tend to commit more violent crimes. Law enforcement agents may be called in as first responders for cases of mental distress; and due to a lack of mental health facilities, resources, and pervasive misconceptions about this population, those with mental illness often end up in the corrections system. In this environment, students in Criminology and Criminal Justice are likely to encounter those with mental illness in their future career paths, and need to be prepared for this reality. This timely work covers the roles of each part of the criminal justice system interacting with mentally ill individuals, from law enforcement and first responders, social services, public health services, sentencing and corrections, to release and re-entry. It also covers the crucial topic of mental health for criminal justice professionals, who suffer from high rates of job stress, PTSD, and other mental health issues. The final section of the book includes suggestions for future research. This work will be of interest to students of criminology and criminal justice with an interest in working in the professional sector, as well as those in related fields of sociology, psychology, and public health. It will also be of interest to policy-makers and practitioners already working in the field. The overall goal of this work is to inform, educate, and inspire change.


Mental Disorder And Criminal Law

Author by : Robert Schopp
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer Science & Business Media
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 43
Total Download : 426
File Size : 49,6 Mb
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Description : expands traditional inquiry regarding the significance of psychopathology in the criminal process to include blameworthiness for sentencing, criminal competence at various stages in the process, and dangerousness pairs legal analysis with empirical research in order to promotoe integration of these two aspects of relevant inquiry addresses a wide range of participants in the legal, clinical, and academic disciplines


Mental Illness The Criminal Justice System And Inequality

Author by : Emma Frankham
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 301
File Size : 47,6 Mb
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Description : This dissertation examines different manifestations of inequality for people with mental illness who come into contact with the criminal justice system. The type of inequality I examine ranges from racial/ethnic disparities in how individuals with mental illness killed by police are portrayed in the news; to the stigmatization of these individuals; and finally how low socioeconomic status is associated with rates of mental health-related 911 calls. Despite widespread news coverage about individuals with mental illness killed by police, we know little about how these individuals are portrayed in the news. This is a significant omission because of the ability of the media to shape public opinion and policy debate. The first empirical chapter answers the question: are there differences in how individuals are portrayed by race/ethnicity? To do so, I examine news reports about men with mental illness killed by police. I find that people of color are not portrayed in the same manner when race/ethnicity and mental illness intersect, with African-Americans being more likely to be portrayed as victims of police actions than Hispanics. For African-American men, journalists may be privileging community members who question police actions. The second empirical chapter answers the question: is mental illness in the context of fatal police shootings stigmatized in the news, and if so, how? In this chapter I analyze news reports about both men and women with mental illness who were killed by police. To date, research on stigmatizing language has focused on explicit types. However, a failure to recognize implicit forms provides an incomplete perspective. I propose and apply a framework for stigma identification and find that implicit types of stigmatization are more common than explicit types in news reports about persons with mental illness killed by police. The final empirical chapter examines a different type of inequality for those who come into contact with the criminal justice system and asks: is socioeconomic status a predictor of mental health-related 911 calls independent of mental health? Answering this question is important because knowing which factors are associated with mental health-related calls could influence effective resource allocation. I analyze census tract-level data across three cities and find that a lack of financial resources is positively associated with mental health-related calls, independent of poor mental health. I argue that individuals of low socioeconomic status rely on this public safety net more so than affluent individuals, and that this is an under-recognized mechanism by which individuals of low socioeconomic status with mental illness come into contact with police.


The Criminalization Of Mental Illness

Author by : Risdon N. Slate
Languange : en
Publisher by : Carolina Academic Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 74
Total Download : 615
File Size : 47,9 Mb
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Description : For a myriad of reasons the criminal justice system has become the de facto mental health system. This book explores how and why this is the case. Sensationalized cases often drive criminal justice policies that can sometimes be impulsively enacted and misguided. While there are chapters that examine competency, insanity, and inpatient and outpatient commitment, the primary focus of the book is on the bulk of encounters that clog the criminal justice system with persons with mental illnesses (pwmi). Criminal justice practitioners are often ill-equipped for dealing with pwmi in crises. However, via application of therapeutic jurisprudence principles some agencies are better preparing their employees for such encounters and attempting to stop the inhumane and costly recycling of pwmi through the criminal justice system. Coverage runs the gamut from deinstitutionalization, to specialized law enforcement responses, to mental health courts, to jails and prisons, to discharge planning, diversion, and reentry. Also, criminal justice practitioners in their own words provide insight into and examples of the interface between the mental health and criminal justice systems. Throughout the book the balance between maintaining public safety and preserving civil liberties is examined as the state's police power and parens patriae roles are considered. Reasoned, collaborative approaches for influencing and informing policies that are often driven by crises are discussed; this book also reflects more psychological underpinnings than the 1st edition, as one of the co-authors new to this edition is a forensic clinical psychologist. The following Teaching Materials are available electronically on a CD or via email (Please contact Beth Hall at bhall@cap-press.com to request a copy, and specify what format is needed): -Teacher's Manual with notes and extensive test bank in Word/pdf formats -Test bank is also available in separate files by chapter in Word and Blackboard formats. Other LMS formats may be available; let me know what you need.) Upon adoption only, the following are also available: -3 Videos. Upon adoption only. One video illustrates Crisis Intervention Team scenarios, another explores PTSD and the third video is of a lecture author Risdon Slate gave to law enforcement in training that describes his own personal story. -PowerPoint slides will be available upon adoption. Email bhall@cap-press.com for more information. “I am so grateful that I have decided on this book and the resources are amazing.” — Joseph C. Marinello, lecturer in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, UNC Charlotte (on classroom adoption of second edition) “Notorious criminal cases tend to drive public opinion and policy when it comes to how our criminal justice system deals with persons with mental illnesses. Drs. Slate and Johnson’s book is a far brighter star to steer by. By most accounts, including the US Department of Justice, our criminal justice system is in crisis. In The Criminalization of Mental Illness the authors explain how our justice system has failed persons with mental illnesses, the public and its own self-interests. But rather than place blame, the authors focus on illuminating the history and anatomy of the problem and offering real solutions. Because they are based on careful scholarship, their proposals are authoritative and make sense. But it is their informed empathy for all the players involved in the tragedy—not just persons with mental illnesses—that makes this book a must read for anyone involved in the criminal justice system or simply interested in knowing the truth of how it is broken and can be fixed.” — Xavier F. Amador, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Columbia University, Author of the National Best Seller I am Not Sick, I Don’t Need Help! and I’m Right, You’re Wrong, Now What? “The book confronts myths and social/political policy failures directly; and with great honor recognizes those advocates whose work has moved social justice and mental health policy forward. [Their] dedication and passion to the subject of promoting human rights and recovery is evident in every word. It is a masterful, relevant and inspiring work.” — Ginger Lerner-Wren, the nation’s first mental health court judge and member of the President’s Commission on Mental Health “[This book] provides extraordinary insights into the manner by which people with mental illness are processed through the criminal justice system… I thoroughly enjoyed this work and would recommend it to anyone who has an interest in issues involving mental illness and the criminal justice system. I have seen a few books in this area, but have never found one quite as comprehensive and well-researched. It is, without exception, one of the best academic books that I have read in many years.” — Penn State, Altoona, Professor Robert M. Worley in his book review for The Southwest Journal of Criminal Justice, Fall 2008 “This is a highly insightful and important book which corrections staff, academics, students, and the general public should know about.” — Ken Kerle, Ph.D, American Jail Association “Overall this very readable book provides a good survey of the various sectors of thecriminal justice system and their response to the substantive changes that have affected persons with mental illness during the recent past. These authors provide a valuable guide for mental health professionals interested in appropriate treatment and placement of persons with mental illness.” — Frederick J. Frese, Ph.D., Psychiatric Services: A Journal of the American Psychiatric Association “Without a doubt, it is the most comprehensive explanation of what has happened between the two systems during the past 40 or so years. It explains not only the crisis that exists and how we got here, but some interesting and innovative ways that local governments are providing solutions… [M]ore important than the chronicling of the impact of this social crisis, it demonstrates with pointed examples how the two systems intertwine with well-intentioned judicial and treatment policies. No matter how you view the issue of the mentally ill in prison, the book demonstrates that the person left out of the discussion is the defendant/offender/patient.” — Corrections Today