Modern Agitators

Author by : David W. Bartlett
Languange : en
Publisher by :
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Modern Agitators Or

Author by : David Vandewater Golden Bartlett
Languange : en
Publisher by :
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Total Read : 22
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The Lives Of Frederick Douglass

Author by : Robert S. Levine
Languange : en
Publisher by : Harvard University Press
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Total Read : 90
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Description : Frederick Douglass’s changeable sense of his own life story is reflected in his many conflicting accounts of events during his journey from slavery to freedom. Robert S. Levine creates a fascinating collage of this elusive subject—revisionist biography at its best, offering new perspectives on Douglass the social reformer, orator, and writer.


Blackface Nation

Author by : Brian Roberts
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 45
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Description : As the United States transitioned from a rural nation to an urbanized, industrial giant between the War of 1812 and the early twentieth century, ordinary people struggled over the question of what it meant to be American. As Brian Roberts shows in Blackface Nation, this struggle is especially evident in popular culture and the interplay between two specific strains of music: middle-class folk and blackface minstrelsy. The Hutchinson Family Singers, the Northeast’s most popular middle-class singing group during the mid-nineteenth century, is perhaps the best example of the first strain of music. The group’s songs expressed an American identity rooted in communal values, with lyrics focusing on abolition, women’s rights, and socialism. Blackface minstrelsy, on the other hand, emerged out of an audience-based coalition of Northern business elites, Southern slaveholders, and young, white, working-class men, for whom blackface expressed an identity rooted in individual self-expression, anti-intellectualism, and white superiority. Its performers embodied the love-crime version of racism, in which vast swaths of the white public adored African Americans who fit blackface stereotypes even as they used those stereotypes to rationalize white supremacy. By the early twentieth century, the blackface version of the American identity had become a part of America’s consumer culture while the Hutchinsons’ songs were increasingly regarded as old-fashioned. Blackface Nation elucidates the central irony in America’s musical history: much of the music that has been interpreted as black, authentic, and expressive was invented, performed, and enjoyed by people who believed strongly in white superiority. At the same time, the music often depicted as white, repressed, and boringly bourgeois was often socially and racially inclusive, committed to reform, and devoted to challenging the immoralities at the heart of America’s capitalist order.


Freedom S Ferment Phases Of American Social History To 1860

Author by : Alice Felt Tyler
Languange : en
Publisher by : Read Books Ltd
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 29
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Description : PART ONE The Faith of the Young Republic CHAPTER 1: Dynamic Democracy CHAPTER 2: Evangelical Religion PART TWO Cults and Utopias. CHAPTER 3: Transcendentalism. CHAPTER 4: Millennialism and Spiritualism. CHAPTER 5: The Stake in Zion . CHAPTER 6: Religious Communism in America. CHAPTER 7: The Shaker Communities. CHAPTER 8: American Utopias of Religious Origin. CHAPTER 9: Utopian Socialism in America. PART THREE Humanitarian Crusades CHAPTER 10: Education and the American Faith. CHAPTER 11: Reform for the Criminal. CHAPTER 12: Wards of the State. CHAPTER 13: The Temperance Crusade. CHAPTER 14: Denials of Democratic Principles CHAPTER 15: The Crusade for Peace CHAPTER 16: The Rights of Women. CHAPTER 17: Like a Fire-bell in the Night. CHAPTER 18: A House Divided.


The Underground Railroad

Author by : Mary Ellen Snodgrass
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 57
Total Download : 954
File Size : 52,9 Mb
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Description : The culmination of years of research in dozens of archives and libraries, this fascinating encyclopedia provides an unprecedented look at the network known as the Underground Railroad - that mysterious "system" of individuals and organizations that helped slaves escape the American South to freedom during the years before the Civil War. In operation as early as the 1500s and reaching its peak with the abolitionist movement of the antebellum period, the Underground Railroad saved countless lives and helped alter the course of American history. This is the most complete reference on the Underground Railroad ever published. It includes full coverage of the Railroad in both the United States and Canada, which was the ultimate destination of many of the escaping slaves. "The Underground Railroad: An Encyclopedia of People, Places, and Operations" explores the people, places, writings, laws, and organizations that made this network possible. More than 1,500 entries detail the families and personalities involved in the operation, and sidebars extract primary source materials for longer entries. This encyclopedia features extensive supporting materials, including maps with actual Underground Railroad escape routes, photos, a chronology, genealogies of those involved in the operation, a listing of Underground Railroad operatives by state or Canadian province, a "passenger" list of escaping slaves, and primary and secondary source bibliographies.


The Pearl

Author by : Josephine F. Pacheco
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of North Carolina Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 71
Total Download : 374
File Size : 41,7 Mb
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Description : In the spring of 1848 seventy-six slaves from the nation's capital hid aboard a schooner called the Pearl in an attempt to sail down the Potomac River and up the Chesapeake Bay to freedom in Pennsylvania. When inclement weather forced them to anchor for the night, the fugitive slaves and the ship's crew were captured and returned to Washington. Many of the slaves were sold to the Lower South, and two men sailing the Pearl were tried and sentenced to prison. Recounting this harrowing tale from the preparations for escape through the participants' trial, Josephine Pacheco provides fresh insight into the lives of enslaved blacks in the District of Columbia, putting a human face on the victims of the interstate slave trade, whose lives have been overshadowed by larger historical events. Pacheco also details the Congressional debates about slavery that resulted from this large-scale escape attempt. She contends that although the incident itself and the trials and Congressional disputes that followed were not directly responsible for bringing an end to the slave trade in the nation's capital, they played a pivotal role in publicizing many of the issues surrounding slavery. Eventually, President Millard Fillmore pardoned the operators of the Pearl.