Protestant Missionaries Humanitarianism In The Drc

Author by : Jeremy Rich
Languange : en
Publisher by : Boydell & Brewer
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Description : A significant contribution to the history of humanitarianism, Christianity and the politics of aid in Africa.


British Humanitarianism And The Congo Reform Movement 1896 1913

Author by : Dean Pavlakis
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Description : The Congo Free State was under the personal rule of King Leopold II of the Belgians from 1885 to 1908. The accolades that attended its founding were soon contested by accusations of brutality, oppression, and murderous misrule, but the controversy, by itself, proved insufficient to prompt changes. Starting in 1896, concerned men and women used public opinion to influence government policy in Britain and the United States to create space for reforming forces in Belgium itself to pry the Congo from Leopold’s grasp and implement reforms. Examining key factors in the successes and failures of a pivotal movement that aided the colonized people of the Congo and broadened the idea of human rights, British Humanitarianism and the Congo Reform Movement provides a valuable update to scholarship on the history of humanitarianism in Africa. The Congo Reform movement built on the institutional experience of overseas humanitarianism, the energy of evangelical political involvement, and innovations in racial, imperial, and nationalist discourse to create political energy. Often portrayed as the efforts of a few key people, especially E.D. Morel, this book demonstrates that the movement increasingly manifested itself as an institutionalized and transnational campaign with support from key government officials that ultimately made a material difference to the lives of the people of the Congo.


Foreign Policy At The Periphery

Author by : Bevan Sewell
Languange : en
Publisher by : University Press of Kentucky
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Description : As American interests assumed global proportions after 1945, policy makers were faced with the challenge of prioritizing various regions and determining the extent to which the United States was prepared to defend and support them. Superpowers and developing nations soon became inextricably linked and decolonizing states such as Vietnam, India, and Egypt assumed a central role in the ideological struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union. As the twentieth century came to an end, many of the challenges of the Cold War became even more complex as the Soviet Union collapsed and new threats arose. Featuring original essays by leading scholars, Foreign Policy at the Periphery examines relationships among new nations and the United States from the end of the Second World War through the global war on terror. Rather than reassessing familiar flashpoints of US foreign policy, the contributors explore neglected but significant developments such as the efforts of evangelical missionaries in the Congo, the 1958 stabilization agreement with Argentina, Henry Kissinger's policies toward Latin America during the 1970s, and the financing of terrorism in Libya via petrodollars. Blending new, internationalist approaches to diplomatic history with newly released archival materials, Foreign Policy at the Periphery brings together diverse strands of scholarship to address compelling issues in modern world history.


Transforming Missiology

Author by : Fohle Lygunda li-M
Languange : en
Publisher by : Langham Publishing
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Description : Dr Fohle Lygunda li-M provides a thorough analysis of missiological teaching in theological institutions in Africa, with special reference to ten Christian universities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. His detailed examination of current teaching of mission theory and practice builds a solid foundation for the articulation of a new paradigm of missiological education. In this book, Dr Lygunda presents the case for a transformed approach to raising up seminarians who are equipped to lead indigenous missional churches that will fulfil the Great Commission in their own communities and beyond their national borders.


Humanitarian Photography

Author by : Heide Fehrenbach
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
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Total Read : 67
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Description : For well over a century, humanitarians and their organizations have used photographic imagery and the latest media technologies to raise public awareness and funds to alleviate human suffering. This volume examines the historical evolution of what we today call 'humanitarian photography' - the mobilization of photography in the service of humanitarian initiatives across state boundaries - and asks how we can account for the shift from the fitful and debated use of photography for humanitarian purposes in the late nineteenth century to our current situation in which photographers market themselves as 'humanitarian photographers'. This book investigates how humanitarian photography emerged and how it operated in diverse political, institutional, and social contexts, bringing together more than a dozen scholars working on the history of humanitarianism, international organizations and nongovernmental organizations, and visual culture in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and the United States.


Humanitarian Imperialism

Author by : Amalia Ribi Forclaz
Languange : en
Publisher by : OUP Oxford
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Total Read : 40
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Description : Between the late 1880s and the onset of the Second World War, anti-slavery activism experienced a revival in Europe. Anti-slavery organizations in Britain, Italy, France, and Switzerland forged an informal international network to fight the continued existence of slavery and slave trading in Africa. Humanitarian Imperialism explores the scope and outreach of these antislavery groups along with their organisational efforts and campaigning strategies. The account focuses on the interwar years, when slavery in Africa became a focal point of humanitarian and imperial interest, linking Catholic and Protestant philanthropists, missionaries of different faiths, colonial officials, diplomats, and political leaders in Africa and Europe. At the centre of the narrative is the campaign against slavery in Ethiopia, an issue which served as a catalyst for the articulation of international humanitarian standards within the League of Nations in Geneva. By looking at the interplay between British and Italian advocates of abolition, Humanitarian Imperialism shows how in the 1930s anti-slavery campaigning evolved in close association with Fascist imperialism. Thus, during the Italo-Ethiopian war of 1935, the anti-slavery argument became a propaganda tool to placate public opinion in Britain and elsewhere. Because of its global echoes, however, the conflict also generated worldwide protest that undermined the beliefs and certainties of anti-slavery campaigners, resulting in a crisis of humanitarian imperialism. By following the story of anti-slavery activism into the post-1945 period, this volume illuminates the continuities and discontinuities in the international history of humanitarian organizations as well as the history of imperial humanitarianism.


Congo

Author by : Thomas Turner
Languange : en
Publisher by : John Wiley & Sons
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Description : The Democratic Republic of Congo has become one of the world's bloodiest hot spots. 2003 saw the end of a five-year war in which millions lost their lives - one of the deadliest conflicts since World War II. Despite recent peace agreements and democratic elections, the country is still plagued by army and militia violence. Congo remains deeply troubled, since the deep-rooted causes of conflict have not been adequately addressed. The conflict in the DRC has divided opinion; some call it a civil war, or a war of aggression by the country's neighbours; others a continuation of Rwanda's Hutu-Tutsi conflict on Congolose soil, and a war of partition and pillage. The prevalence of rape and sexual violence has led some analysts to mark it out as a hidden ‘war against women'. Tom Turner's insightful book reveals how each of these descriptions accurately captures the separate elements of this complex and multidimensional political conflict. In exploring each of these contributory factors, he shows how current attempts to rebuild the shattered state and society of DRC are doomed to fail. So long as the full complexity of the Congo crisis is not taken into account and a clear consensus as to its precise dimensions reached, the future looks bleak. The DRC, he argues, will likely remain a global hot spot for some time to come.


Religion Colonization And Decolonization In Congo 1885 1960 Religion Colonisation Et D Colonisation Au Congo 1885 1960

Author by : Vincent Viaene
Languange : en
Publisher by : Leuven University Press
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Description : Religion in today’s Democratic Republic of Congo has many faces: from the overflowing seminaries and Marian shrines of the Catholic Church to the Islamic brotherhoods, from the healers of Kimban-guism to the televangelism of the booming Pentecostalist churches in the great cities, from the Orthodox communities of Kasai to the ‘invisible’ Mai Mai warriors in the brousse of Kivu. During the colonial period religion was no less central to people’s lives than it is today. More surprisingly, behind the seemingly smooth facade of missions linked closely to imperial power, faith and worship were already marked by diversity and dynamism, tying the Congo into broader African and global movements. The contributions in this book provide insight into the multifaceted history of the interaction between religion and colonization. The authors outline the institutional political framework, and focus on the challenge that old and new forms of slavery entailed for the missions. The atrocities committed at the time of the Congo Free State became an existential question for young Christian communities. In the Belgian Congo after 1908, more structural forms of colonial violence remained a key issue marking religious experiences. And yet, religion also acted as a bridge. The authors emphasize the role intermediaries such as catechists or medical assistants played in the African “appropriation” of Christianity. They examine the complex interaction with indigenous religious beliefs and practices, and zoom in on the part religions played in the independence movement, as well as on their reaction to independence itself. Coming at a moment when Belgium confronts its colonial past, this volume provides a timely reassessment of religion as a key factor.


The Oxford History Of Protestant Dissenting Traditions Volume V

Author by : Mark P. Hutchinson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
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Description : The-five volume Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions series is governed by a motif of migration ('out-of-England'). It first traces organized church traditions that arose in Britain and Ireland as Dissenters distanced themselves from a state church defined by diocesan episcopacy, the Book of Common Prayer, the Thirty-Nine Articles, and Royal Supremacy, but then follows those traditions as they spread beyond Britain and Ireland—and also analyses newer traditions that emerged downstream in other parts of the world from earlier forms of Dissent. Secondly, it does the same for the doctrines, church practices, stances toward state and society, attitudes toward Scripture, and characteristic patterns of organization that also originated in earlier British and Irish dissent, but that have often defined a trajectory of influence independent of ecclesiastical organizations. The Oxford History of Protestant Dissenting Traditions, Volume V follows the spatial, cultural, and intellectual changes in dissenting identity and practice in the twentieth century, as these once European traditions globalized. While in Europe dissent was often against the religious state, dissent in a globalizing world could redefine itself against colonialism or other secular and religious monopolies. The contributors trace the encounters of dissenting Protestant traditions with modernity and globalization; changing imperial politics; challenges to biblical, denominational, and pastoral authority; local cultures and languages; and some of the century's major themes, such as race and gender, new technologies, and organizational change. In so doing, they identify a vast array of local and globalizing illustrations which will enliven conversations about the role of religion, and in particular Christianity.


The Origins Of Global Humanitarianism

Author by : Peter Stamatov
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
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Description : Locates the historical origins of modern global humanitarianism in the recurrent conflict over the ethical treatment of non-Europeans.


Congo Sole

Author by : Emmanuel Ntibonera
Languange : en
Publisher by : Morgan James Faith
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Description : One person can make a difference in the lives of a nation. In this case, it's with one pair of shoes at a time. Emmanuel Ntibonera's quiet life in the Democratic Republic of the Congo was shattered when the Great War of Africa plunged his homeland into chaos. Only a boy, Emmanuel's childhood gave way to a daily fight for survival when his family was forced to flee and become refugees in Kenya. After almost a decade of struggle, the Ntiboneras left Africa-and their fight for survival-behind. As miracle after miracle pulled his family from the brink of death, Emmanuel devoted his life to God's work. Emmanuel went to college and built his own life in the Land of Opportunity. One day, he realized how far he had come without looking back. Emmanuel decided to leave the safe borders of America and trace his footsteps back to the life he'd left behind. Fifteen years after escaping the Congo, he returned to his homeland. What he discovered there-disease, extreme poverty, deficient infrastructure, and, worst of all, a prevalent spirit of hopelessness-changed his life forever, setting him on an ambitious mission. The fact that countless Congolese were ravaged by infections from soil-transmitted diseases struck Emmanuel. He knew how they felt. He didn't own his first pair of shoes until he was ten years old. Since he, like many Americans, had shoes collecting dust in the back of his closet, Emmanuel decided to put abandoned sneakers to good use. He started collecting gently used footwear to bring hope to his people. Together with his family, Emmanuel labored for two years until 10,000 pairs of shoes filled every inch of space in the family's house. His work united thousands across the country, even attracting the attention of NBA star Steph Curry to help double the shoe collection in one day. CONGO SOLE shows evangelical leaders, globally conscious human rights activists, students, and readers of all kinds not only a story of survival in the midst of unbelievable hardships, but how prayer and tenacious faith can change the course of a nation.


Empire Of Humanity

Author by : Michael Barnett
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cornell University Press
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Description : Empire of Humanity explores humanitarianism’s remarkable growth from its humble origins in the early nineteenth century to its current prominence in global life. In contrast to most contemporary accounts of humanitarianism that concentrate on the last two decades, Michael Barnett ties the past to the present, connecting the antislavery and missionary movements of the nineteenth century to today’s peacebuilding missions, the Cold War interventions in places like Biafra and Cambodia to post–Cold War humanitarian operations in regions such as the Great Lakes of Africa and the Balkans; and the creation of the International Committee of the Red Cross in 1863 to the emergence of the major international humanitarian organizations of the twentieth century. Based on extensive archival work, close encounters with many of today’s leading international agencies, and interviews with dozens of aid workers in the field and at headquarters, Empire of Humanity provides a history that is both global and intimate. Avoiding both romanticism and cynicism, Empire of Humanity explores humanitarianism’s enduring themes, trends, and, most strikingly, ethical ambiguities. Humanitarianism hopes to change the world, but the world has left its mark on humanitarianism. Humanitarianism has undergone three distinct global ages—imperial, postcolonial, and liberal—each of which has shaped what humanitarianism can do and what it is. The world has produced not one humanitarianism, but instead varieties of humanitarianism. Furthermore, Barnett observes that the world of humanitarianism is divided between an emergency camp that wants to save lives and nothing else and an alchemist camp that wants to remove the causes of suffering. These camps offer different visions of what are the purpose and principles of humanitarianism, and, accordingly respond differently to the same global challenges and humanitarianism emergencies. Humanitarianism has developed a metropolis of global institutions of care, amounting to a global governance of humanity. This humanitarian governance, Barnett observes, is an empire of humanity: it exercises power over the very individuals it hopes to emancipate. Although many use humanitarianism as a symbol of moral progress, Barnett provocatively argues that humanitarianism has undergone its most impressive gains after moments of radical inhumanity, when the "international community" believes that it must atone for its sins and reduce the breach between what we do and who we think we are. Humanitarianism is not only about the needs of its beneficiaries; it also is about the needs of the compassionate.


Turning Points In The Expansion Of Christianity

Author by : Alice T. Ott
Languange : en
Publisher by : Baker Academic
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Description : This readable survey on the history of missions tells the story of pivotal turning points in the expansion of Christianity, enabling readers to grasp the big picture of missional trends and critical developments. Alice Ott examines twelve key points in the growth of Christianity across the globe from the Jerusalem Council to Lausanne '74, an approach that draws on her many years of classroom teaching. Each chapter begins with a close-up view of a particularly compelling and paradigmatic episode in Christian history before panning out for a broader historical outlook. The book draws deeply on primary sources and covers some topics not addressed in similar volumes, such as the role of British abolitionism on mission to Africa and the relationship between imperialism and mission. It demonstrates that the expansion of Christianity was not just a Western-driven phenomenon; rather, the gospel spread worldwide through the efforts of both Western and non-Western missionaries and through the crucial ministry of indigenous lay Christians, evangelists, and preachers. This fascinating account of worldwide Christianity is suitable not only for the classroom but also for churches, workshops, and other seminars.


Colonization And The Origins Of Humanitarian Governance

Author by : Alan Lester
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
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Description : How did those responsible for creating Britain's nineteenth-century settler empire render colonization compatible with humanitarianism? Avoiding a cynical or celebratory response, this book takes seriously the humane disposition of colonial officials, examining the relationship between humanitarian governance and empire. The story of 'humane' colonial governance connects projects of emancipation, amelioration, conciliation, protection and development in sites ranging from British Honduras through Van Diemen's Land and New South Wales, New Zealand and Canada to India. It is seen in the lives of governors like George Arthur and George Grey, whose careers saw the violent and destructive colonization of indigenous peoples at the hands of British emigrants. The story challenges the exclusion of officials' humanitarian sensibilities from colonial history and places the settler colonies within the larger historical context of Western humanitarianism.


The Civilising Mission Of Portuguese Colonialism 1870 1930

Author by : Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
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Description : This book provides an historical, critical analysis of the doctrine of 'civilising mission' in Portuguese colonialism in the crucial period from 1870 to 1930. Exploring international contexts and transnational connections, this 'civilising mission' is analysed and assessed by examining the employment and distribution of African manpower.


Humanitarianism In Question

Author by : Michael Barnett
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cornell University Press
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Description : Table of Contents List of Abbreviations 1. Humanitarianism: A Brief History of the Present - MICHAEL BARNETT AND THOMAS G. WEISS 2. The Rise of Emergency Relief Aid - JAMES D. FEARON 3. The Imperative to Reduce Suffering: Charity, Progress, and Emergencies in the Field of Humanitarian Action - CRAIG CALHOUN 4. Saying "No" to Wal-Mart? Money and Morality in Professional Humanitarianism - STEPHEN HOPGOOD 5. Humanitarian Organizations: Accountable-Why, to Whom, for What, and How? - JANICE GROSS STEIN 6. The Grand Strategies of Humanitarianism - MICHAEL BARNLTT AND JACK SNYDER 7. The Power of Holding Humanitarianism in Hostage and the Myth of Protective Principles - LAURA HAMMOND 8. Sacrifice, Triage, and Global Humanitarianism - PETER REDFIELD 9. The Distributive Commitments of International NGOs - JENNIFER C. RUBENSTEIN 10. Humanitarianism as a Scholarly Vocation - MICHAEL BARNETT 11. Humanitarianism and Practitioners: Social Science Matters - PETER J. HOFFMAN AND THOMAS G. WEISS Contributors Index.


Encyclopedia Of Protestantism

Author by : Hans J. Hillerbrand
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Description : For more information including sample entries, full contents listing, and more, visit the Encyclopedia of Protestantism web site. Routledge is proud to announce the publication of a new major reference work from world-renowned scholar Hans J. Hillerbrand. The Encyclopedia of Protestantism is the definitive reference to the history and beliefs that continue to exert a profound influence on Western thought. Featuring entries written by an international team of specialists and scholars, the encyclopedia traces the course of Protestantism from its beginnings prior to 1517, when Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the door of Wittenberg Cathedral, to the vital and diverse international scene of the present day.


Travel Writing And Atrocities

Author by : Robert M. Burroughs
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Total Read : 41
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Description : This book examines eyewitness travel reports of atrocities committed in European-funded slave regimes in the Congo Free State, Portuguese West Africa, and the Putumayo district of the Amazon rainforest during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. During this time, British explorers, missionaries, consuls, journalists, soldiers, and traders produced evidence of misrule in the Congo, Angola, and the Putumayo, which they described their travel and witnessing of colonial violence in travelogues, ethnographic monographs, consular reports, diaries and letters, sketches, photography, and more. As well as bringing home to readers ongoing brutalities, eyewitness narratives contributed to debates on humanitarianism, trade, colonialism, and race and racial prejudice in late Victorian and Edwardian Britain. In particular, whereas earlier antislavery travelers had tended to promote British imperial expansion as a remedy to slavery, travel texts produced for the three major humanitarian campaigns of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century expressed — and, indeed, gave rise to — changes in the perception of Britain as a nation for whom the protection of Africans remained paramount. Burroughs's study charts the emergence of a subversive eyewitness response in travel writing, which implicated Britons and British industries in the continuing existence of slave labor in regions formally ruled by other nations.


The Rise And Fall Of Modern Empires Volume Iv

Author by : Martin Shipway
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Description : The collection of essays in this volume offers an overview of scholarly approaches to the ways in which diverse actors, representing the colonised or the colonising nations, or indeed the international community, reacted to colonialism during the lifetime of the modern colonial empires or in their aftermath. The coverage is broad in terms of geographical scope and historical period, with articles on the major colonial empires in Asia and Africa and the imperial centres of Paris, London and Berlin, from the conquests of the late nineteenth century to the period of decolonisation. The selection also reflects recent academic trends by focusing on countries whose colonial past and experience of decolonisation have been studied and debated with particular intensity, such as Algeria, Kenya and India. The volume draws on previously published articles and book chapters by leading international scholars writing in, or translated into, English and includes a critical introduction which situates each essay in relation to recent debates in this dynamic and expanding field of study.


Against Massacre

Author by : Davide Rodogno
Languange : en
Publisher by : Princeton University Press
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Description : "A timely, ambitious, and clearheaded account of the complex history of humanitarian intervention in the nineteenth century. Rodogno astutely shows how European humanitarianism fed on views of the Ottoman Empire as barbaric and moribund, and its Christian subjects as uniquely deserving of sympathy. Stressing the selectivity of interventions and the mixed motives of their agents, Rodogno traces the interplay between public opinion, the journalism that fueled it, and European states' imperial and geopolitical agendas."--Jennifer Pitts, University of Chicago "This excellent book offers a fresh and imaginative look at the history of humanitarian intervention by focusing on European action or inaction in the Ottoman Empire during episodes of violence against some of its Christian populations. Its well-researched and nuanced analysis illuminates the theory and practice of such interventions that remain very relevant for our own day. It also recasts through this prism the much-vexed 'Eastern Question' in highly original ways."--Aron Rodrigue, Stanford University "Against Massacre is a comprehensive and readable account of the first modern humanitarian interventions by Western powers in the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire. While the new 'responsibility to protect' norm is making more impact than Rodogno concedes, he is right to suggest that broad consensus on military action in mass atrocity cases will long be elusive: the nineteenth-century legacy of selective response lives on."--Gareth Evans, cochair, International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty "In this outstanding, elegant, and informative book, Rodogno makes a powerful case for reexamining humanitarian intervention from a historical perspective by exploring cases of European involvement in the Ottoman Empire during the nineteenth century. With impressive research and insightful analysis, Against Massacre will have a major impact in international history and be of great importance to humanities and political science scholars."--J. P. Daughton, Stanford University "Studying the emergence of humanitarian intervention in the nineteenth century and its implementation in the Ottoman Empire, Rodogno provides a new and interesting view on the concept as a whole. Rodogno's topic is excellent, his approach original, and his arguments sound and well-grounded. I know of no similar book."--Stevan K. Pavlowitch, emeritus professor of history, University of Southampton


God S Internationalists

Author by : David P. King
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Pennsylvania Press
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Description : Over the past seventy years, World Vision has grown from a small missionary agency to the largest Christian humanitarian organization in the world, with 40,000 employees, offices in nearly one hundred countries, and an annual budget of over $2 billion. While founder Bob Pierce was an evangelist with street smarts, the most recent World Vision U.S. presidents move with ease between megachurches, the boardrooms of Fortune 500 companies, and the corridors of Capitol Hill. Though the organization has remained decidedly Christian, it has earned the reputation as an elite international nongovernmental organization managed efficiently by professional experts fluent in the language of both marketing and development. God's Internationalists is the first comprehensive study of World Vision—or any such religious humanitarian agency. In chronicling the organization's transformation from 1950 to the present, David P. King approaches World Vision as a lens through which to explore shifts within post-World War II American evangelicalism as well as the complexities of faith-based humanitarianism. Chronicling the evolution of World Vision's practices, theology, rhetoric, and organizational structure, King demonstrates how the organization rearticulated and retained its Christian identity even as it expanded beyond a narrow American evangelical subculture. King's pairing of American evangelicals' interactions abroad with their own evolving identity at home reframes the traditional narrative of modern American evangelicalism while also providing the historical context for the current explosion of evangelical interest in global social engagement. By examining these patterns of change, God's Internationalists offers a distinctive angle on the history of religious humanitarianism.


Light On Darkness

Author by : T. Jack Thompson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
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Description : In its earliest days, photography was seen as depicting its subjects with such objectivity as to be inherently free of ideological bias. Today we are rightly more skeptical -- at least most of the time. When it comes to photography from the past, we tend to set some of our skepticism aside. But should we? In Light on Darkness? T. Jack Thompson, a leading historian of African Christianity, revisits the body of photography generated by British missionaries to sub-Saharan Africa in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and demonstrates that much more is going on in these images than meets the eye. This volume offers a careful reassessment of missionary photographers, their photographs, and their African and European audiences. Several dozen fascinating photographs from the period are included.


Mission And State In The Congo

Author by : David Lagergren
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Total Read : 28
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Description :


Presbyterian Reformers In Central Africa

Author by : Benedetto
Languange : en
Publisher by : BRILL
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Total Read : 48
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Description : This volume contains 123 documents which illustrate the early history of the American Presbyterian Congo Mission and its struggle for human rights in the Congo from 1890-1918. The documents, many of which have never been published, are crucial to a full understanding of both the work of the Presbyterian Mission and its impact on the social, political, and religious life of the Congo. The documents are annotated and the volume contains an introduction and an index.


Internationalisms

Author by : Glenda Sluga
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
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Total Read : 39
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Description : This book offers a new view of the twentieth century, placing international ideas and institutions at its heart.


Images Out Of Africa

Author by : Virginia Garner
Languange : en
Publisher by : University Press of America
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Total Read : 61
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Description : Missionaries played a fundamental role in introducing cinema into the developing world in the early twentieth century. These representatives of the Christian community diligently produced films about far-flung cultures to bolster fundraising for mission efforts around the globe. By the interwar period, a few husband-and-wife teams in Africa were making an array of films about vanishing cultures and the struggle to bring Christianity to indigenous populations. Images Out of Africa brings to light the remarkable expedition of one such team of filmmakers. In 1938, Virginia and Ray Garner, working for the Africa Motion Picture Project, ambitiously began making films in the Belgian Congo and French Cameroons, introducing film into villages for the first time. This book features Virginia Garner's recently rediscovered diaries, which highlight the challenges of making films in Africa in the 1930s and include rich descriptions of cross-cultural interactions and micro-negotiations with chiefs, headmen, and villagers.


The Story Of Faith Missions

Author by : Klaus Fiedler
Languange : en
Publisher by : OCMS
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Total Read : 55
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Description :


Encyclopedia Of Christianity In The Global South

Author by : Mark A. Lamport
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 42
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Description : The rapid growth of Christianity in the global south is not just a demographic shift—it is transforming the faith itself. The Encyclopedia of Christianity in the Global South traces both the history and the contemporary themes of Christianity in more than 150 countries and regions. It includes maps, images, and a detailed timeline of key events.


King Leopold S Congo And The Scramble For Africa

Author by : Michael A. Rutz
Languange : en
Publisher by : Hackett Publishing
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Description : "King Leopold of Belgium's exploits up the Congo River in the 1880s were central to the European partitioning of the African continent. The Congo Free State, Leopold's private colony, was a unique political construct that opened the door to the savage exploitation of the Congo's natural and human resources by international corporations. The resulting 'red rubber' scandal—which laid bare a fundamental contradiction between the European propagation of free labor and 'civilization' and colonial governments' acceptance of violence and coercion for productivity's sake—haunted all imperial powers in Africa. Featuring a clever introduction and judicious collection of documents, Michael Rutz's book neatly captures the drama of one king's quest to build an empire in Central Africa—a quest that began in the name of anti-slavery and free trade and ended in the brutal exploitation of human lives. This volume is an excellent starting point for anyone interested in the history of colonial rule in Africa." —Jelmer Vos, University of Glasgow


Imperial Powers And Humanitarian Interventions

Author by : Raphaël Cheriau
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 70
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Description : In the second half of the nineteenth century, the Zanzibar Sultanate became the focal point of European imperial and humanitarian policies, most notably Britain, France, and Germany. In fact, the Sultanate was one of the few places in the world where humanitarianism and imperialism met in the most obvious fashion. This crucial encounter was perfectly embodied by the iconic meeting of Dr. Livingstone and Henry Morton Stanley in 1871. This book challenges the common presumption that those humanitarian concerns only served to conceal vile colonial interests. It brings the repression of the East African slave trade at sea and the expansion of empires into a new light in comparing French and British archives for the first time.