Race Religion And Politics

Author by : Stephanie Y. Mitchem
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 69
Total Download : 666
File Size : 48,6 Mb
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Description : This book examines race, religion, and politics in the United States, illuminating their intersections and what they reveal about power and privilege. Drawing on both historic and recent examples, Stephanie Mitchem discusses human rights throughout and concludes with a chapter looking toward possibilities for increased rights and justice for all.


Race Religion And Politics

Author by : Fred Butler
Languange : en
Publisher by : Xulon Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 89
Total Download : 282
File Size : 53,6 Mb
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Description : Have the American people departed from the path the Founding Fathers envisioned? This history of American politics explores the influence of race and religion on the issues, the choice of candidates, and the effects on our culture.


Adam S Ancestors

Author by : David N. Livingstone
Languange : en
Publisher by : JHU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 61
Total Download : 330
File Size : 53,6 Mb
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Description : He reveals how what began as biblical criticism became a theological apologetic to reconcile religion with science—evolution in particular—and was later used to support arguments for white supremacy and segregation. From heresy to orthodoxy, from radicalism to conservatism, from humanitarianism to racism, Adam's Ancestors tells an intriguing tale of twists and turns in the cultural politics surrounding the age-old question, "Where did we come from?"


A Flock Divided

Author by : Matthew D. O'Hara
Languange : en
Publisher by : Duke University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 62
Total Download : 196
File Size : 44,5 Mb
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Description : Catholicism, as it developed in colonial Mexico, helped to create a broad and remarkably inclusive community of Christian subjects, while it also divided that community into countless smaller flocks. Taking this contradiction as a starting point, Matthew D. O’Hara describes how religious thought and practice shaped Mexico’s popular politics. As he shows, religion facilitated the emergence of new social categories and modes of belonging in which individuals—initially subjects of the Spanish crown, but later citizens and other residents of republican Mexico—found both significant opportunities for improving their place in society and major constraints on their ways of thinking and behaving. O’Hara focuses on interactions between church authorities and parishioners from the late-colonial era into the early-national period, first in Mexico City and later in the surrounding countryside. Paying particular attention to disputes regarding caste status, the category of “Indian,” and the ownership of property, he demonstrates that religious collectivities from neighborhood parishes to informal devotions served as complex but effective means of political organization for plebeians and peasants. At the same time, longstanding religious practices and ideas made colonial social identities linger into the decades following independence, well after republican leaders formally abolished the caste system that classified individuals according to racial and ethnic criteria. These institutional and cultural legacies would be profound, since they raised fundamental questions about political inclusion and exclusion precisely when Mexico was trying to envision and realize new forms of political community. The modes of belonging and organizing created by colonialism provided openings for popular mobilization, but they were always stalked by their origins as tools of hierarchy and marginalization.


Bonds Of Union

Author by : Bridget Ford
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNC Press Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 75
Total Download : 632
File Size : 44,6 Mb
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Description : This vivid history of the Civil War era reveals how unexpected bonds of union forged among diverse peoples in the Ohio-Kentucky borderlands furthered emancipation through a period of spiraling chaos between 1830 and 1865. Moving beyond familiar arguments about Lincoln's deft politics or regional commercial ties, Bridget Ford recovers the potent religious, racial, and political attachments holding the country together at one of its most likely breaking points, the Ohio River. Living in a bitterly contested region, the Americans examined here--Protestant and Catholic, black and white, northerner and southerner--made zealous efforts to understand the daily lives and struggles of those on the opposite side of vexing human and ideological divides. In their common pursuits of religious devotionalism, universal public education regardless of race, and relief from suffering during wartime, Ford discovers a surprisingly capacious and inclusive sense of political union in the Civil War era. While accounting for the era's many disintegrative forces, Ford reveals the imaginative work that went into bridging stark differences in lived experience, and she posits that work as a precondition for slavery's end and the Union's persistence.


God And Race In American Politics

Author by : Mark A. Noll
Languange : en
Publisher by : Princeton University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 89
Total Download : 465
File Size : 54,8 Mb
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Description : Religion has been a powerful political force throughout American history. When race enters the mix the results have been some of our greatest triumphs as a nation--and some of our most shameful failures. In this important book, Mark Noll, one of the most influential historians of American religion writing today, traces the explosive political effects of the religious intermingling with race. Noll demonstrates how supporters and opponents of slavery and segregation drew equally on the Bible to justify the morality of their positions. He shows how a common evangelical heritage supported Jim Crow discrimination and contributed powerfully to the black theology of liberation preached by Martin Luther King Jr. In probing such connections, Noll takes readers from the 1830 slave revolt of Nat Turner through Reconstruction and the long Jim Crow era, from the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s to "values" voting in recent presidential elections. He argues that the greatest transformations in American political history, from the Civil War through the civil rights revolution and beyond, constitute an interconnected narrative in which opposing appeals to Biblical truth gave rise to often-contradictory religious and moral complexities. And he shows how this heritage remains alive today in controversies surrounding stem-cell research and abortion as well as civil rights reform. God and Race in American Politics is a panoramic history that reveals the profound role of religion in American political history and in American discourse on race and social justice.


Rhetorics Of Race And Religion On The Christian Right

Author by : Samuel P. Perry
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lexington Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 588
File Size : 40,7 Mb
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Description : As the first African American president, Barack Obama faced unique challenges and obstacles when addressing issues of race. While rhetorical attacks on the basis of race directed at Obama were not unexpected, many of the most consistent racially-motivated criticisms of Obama were associated with his religious identity. The Jeremiah Wright controversy gave way to the birther and ‘secret Muslim’ conspiracy theories, while anxieties about Obama’s identity proved particularly potent as modes of political attack in the context of the war on terror. This book examines the ways in which those attacks often originated in the rhetoric of the Christian Right and the ways in which these theories circulated amongst the Christian Right. Perry argues that the intersections of race and religion in American politics produced rhetoric that often caricatured Obama as un-American, anti-Christian, and an enemy of the state. By exploring the arguments used to cultivate these characterizations and tracing the roots of conspiracies that worked to delegitimize Obama’s religious identity through racial claims and stereotypes, a clearer picture emerges of what is at stake when people can no longer separate religious convictions from political arguments.


Race And Political Theology

Author by : Vincent Lloyd
Languange : en
Publisher by : Stanford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 45
Total Download : 793
File Size : 50,5 Mb
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Description : In this volume, senior scholars come together to explore how Jewish and African American experiences can make us think differently about the nexus of religion and politics, or political theology. Some wrestle with historical figures, such as William Shakespeare, W. E. B. Du Bois, Nazi journalist Wilhelm Stapel, and Austrian historian Otto Brunner. Others ponder what political theology can contribute to contemporary politics, particularly relating to Israel's complicated religious/racial/national identity and to the religious currents in African American politics. Race and Political Theology opens novel avenues for research in intellectual history, religious studies, political theory, and cultural studies, showing how timely questions about religion and politics must be reframed when race is taken into account.


Religion And Politics In The United States

Author by : Kenneth D. Wald
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 57
Total Download : 869
File Size : 42,6 Mb
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Description : In this edition, updated to reflect recent events and trends, Wald (political science, U. of Florida, Gainesville) and Calhoun-Brown (political science, Georgia State U., Atlanta) show how religious ideas, institutions, movements and communities figure in American political life. They cover whether the US is in fact a secular society, the relations


Democracy In 21st Century America

Author by : Ronald B. Neal
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 26
Total Download : 533
File Size : 40,9 Mb
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Description : Democracy in Twenty-First Century America: Notes on Race, Class, Religion, and Region is an exercise in religious and political philosophy. Fundamentally concerned with the racial and economic crisis of democracy in the United States, this book engages the new face of inequality in America and the new challenges presented to the American democratic project.