Strange Dislocations

Author by : Carolyn Steedman
Languange : en
Publisher by : Harvard University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 61
Total Download : 877
File Size : 40,8 Mb
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Description : Using the perspectives of social and cultural history, and the history of psychology and physiology, Strange Dislocations traces a search for the self, for a past that is lost and gone, and the ways in which, over the last hundred years, the lost vision has come to assume the form of a child.


Strange Dislocations

Author by : C. Steedman
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 89
Total Download : 601
File Size : 44,7 Mb
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Description :


The Peripheral Child In Nineteenth Century Literature And Its Criticism

Author by : N. Cocks
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 56
Total Download : 185
File Size : 55,8 Mb
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Description : Established accounts of the child in nineteenth century literature tend to focus on those who occupy a central position within narratives. This book is concerned with children who are not so easily recognized or remembered, the peripheral or overlooked children to be read in works by Dickens, Brontë, Austen and Rossetti.


The Government Of Childhood

Author by : K. Smith
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 63
Total Download : 874
File Size : 50,9 Mb
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Description : Grounded in the Foucauldian literature on governmentality and drawing on a broad range of disciplines, this book examines the government of childhood in the West from the early modern period to the present. The book deals with three key time-periods and examines shifts in the conceptualization and regulation of childhood and child-rearing.


On Creating A Usable Culture

Author by : Maureen Molloy
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Hawaii Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 556
File Size : 42,6 Mb
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Description : Margaret Mead's career took off in 1928 with the publication of 'Coming of Age in Samoa'. In this book, Maureen Molloy explores how Mead was influenced by, and influenced, the meaning of American culture and secured for herself a unique place in the American popular imagination.


Nostalgia In Transition 1780 1917

Author by : Linda Marilyn Austin
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Virginia Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 19
Total Download : 124
File Size : 43,8 Mb
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Description : In Nostalgia in Transition, 1780-1917, Linda M. Austin traces the development of nostalgia from a memory disorder in the eighteenth century to its modern formulation as a pleasant recreational distraction. Offering a paradigm for and analysis of nostalgic memory as it operates in various attempts to reenact the past, Austin explains both the early and the modern understanding of this phenomenon. For students and scholars interested in the Victorian era as well as in Romanticism and modernism, Nostalgia in Transition provides a well-rounded perspective on how and why our understanding of nostalgia has changed over time.


Haunted Museum

Author by : Jonah Siegel
Languange : en
Publisher by : Princeton University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 84
Total Download : 714
File Size : 45,9 Mb
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Description : Less about place than about the haunting forms of inspiration, more about the desire to arrive than about arrival, 'The Haunted Museum' is an ambitious study of the influential literary fantasy of Italy represented in a tradition including the works of Goethe, Byron, Hawthorne, Freud & Mann.


Racial Innocence

Author by : Robin Bernstein
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 77
Total Download : 853
File Size : 43,9 Mb
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Description : 2013 Book Award Winner from the International Research Society in Children's Literature 2012 Outstanding Book Award Winner from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education 2012 Winner of the Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize presented by the New England American Studies Association 2012 Runner-Up, John Hope Franklin Publication Prize presented by the American Studies Association 2012 Honorable Mention, Distinguished Book Award presented by the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Part of the American Literatures Initiative Series Beginning in the mid nineteenth century in America, childhood became synonymous with innocence—a reversal of the previously-dominant Calvinist belief that children were depraved, sinful creatures. As the idea of childhood innocence took hold, it became racialized: popular culture constructed white children as innocent and vulnerable while excluding black youth from these qualities. Actors, writers, and visual artists then began pairing white children with African American adults and children, thus transferring the quality of innocence to a variety of racial-political projects—a dynamic that Robin Bernstein calls “racial innocence.” This phenomenon informed racial formation from the mid nineteenth century through the early twentieth. Racial Innocence takes up a rich archive including books, toys, theatrical props, and domestic knickknacks which Bernstein analyzes as “scriptive things” that invite or prompt historically-located practices while allowing for resistance and social improvisation. Integrating performance studies with literary and visual analysis, Bernstein offers singular readings of theatrical productions from blackface minstrelsy to Uncle Tom’s Cabin to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; literary works by Joel Chandler Harris, Harriet Wilson, and Frances Hodgson Burnett; material culture including Topsy pincushions, Uncle Tom and Little Eva handkerchiefs, and Raggedy Ann dolls; and visual texts ranging from fine portraiture to advertisements for lard substitute. Throughout, Bernstein shows how “innocence” gradually became the exclusive province of white children—until the Civil Rights Movement succeeded not only in legally desegregating public spaces, but in culturally desegregating the concept of childhood itself. Check out the author's blog for the book here.


Childhood And Cinema

Author by : Vicky Lebeau
Languange : en
Publisher by : Reaktion Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 28
Total Download : 446
File Size : 52,7 Mb
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Description : From Lolita to The Sixth Sense, the figure of the child in cinematic works has been a contested site of symbolism and controversy. Childhood and Cinema examines how the child in film has ultimately been used to embody the anxieties and aspirations of modern life. Vicky Lebeau investigates how films use children to probe such themes as sexuality, death, imagination, the terrors of childhood, and hope. The book ranges over the whole history of Western cinema, from the Lumière brothers’ 1895 Feeding the Baby to Walt Disney’s animation classics to Truffaut’s L’enfant sauvage and recent works such as Capturing the Friedmans and Kids. The figure of the child in film, Lebeau argues, is fundamentally ambivalent—always hovering on the edge between hope and despair, vulnerability and violence, or pleasure and trauma—and it ultimately offers a unique way of thinking about the significance of cinema itself. By turns engaging, thought-provoking, and informative, Childhood and the Cinema challenges us to reconsider the child figure as a conduit for critical reflection on what it means to be human.


Savage Girls And Wild Boys

Author by : Michael Newton
Languange : en
Publisher by : Macmillan
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 28
Total Download : 160
File Size : 54,7 Mb
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Description : Savage Girls and Wild Boys is a fascinating history of extraordinary children---brought up by animals, raised in the wilderness, or locked up for long years in solitary confinement. Wild or feral children have fascinated us through the centuries, and continue to do so today. In a haunting and hugely readable study, Michael Newton deftly investigates a number of infamous cases. He looks at Peter the Wild Boy, who gripped the attention of Swift and Defoe, and at Victor of Aveyron, who roamed wild in the forests of revolutionary France. He tells the story of a savage girl lost on the streets of Paris, of two children brought up by wolves in the jungles of India, and of a Los Angeles girl who emerged from thirteen years locked in a room to international celebrity. He describes, too, a boy brought up among monkeys in Uganda; and in Moscow, the child found living with a pack of wild dogs. Savage Girls and Wild Boys examines the lives of these children and of the adults who "rescued" them, looked after them, educated, or abused them. How can we explain the mixture of disgust and envy that such children can provoke? And what can they teach us about our notions of education, civilization, and man's true nature?