Sweetness and Power

Sweetness and Power
Author: Sidney W. Mintz
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 320
Release: 1986-08-05
ISBN: 1101666641
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Sweetness and Power Book Excerpt:

A fascinating persuasive history of how sugar has shaped the world, from European colonies to our modern diets In this eye-opening study, Sidney Mintz shows how Europeans and Americans transformed sugar from a rare foreign luxury to a commonplace necessity of modern life, and how it changed the history of capitalism and industry. He discusses the production and consumption of sugar, and reveals how closely interwoven are sugar's origins as a "slave" crop grown in Europe's tropical colonies with is use first as an extravagant luxury for the aristocracy, then as a staple of the diet of the new industrial proletariat. Finally, he considers how sugar has altered work patterns, eating habits, and our diet in modern times. "Like sugar, Mintz is persuasive, and his detailed history is a real treat." -San Francisco Chronicle

Refined Tastes

Refined Tastes
Author: Wendy A. Woloson
Publsiher: Johns Hopkins University Press+ORM
Total Pages: 376
Release: 2003-04-30
ISBN: 0801877180
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Refined Tastes Book Excerpt:

A look at sugar in 19th-century American culture and how it rose in popularity to gain its place in the nation’s diet today. American consumers today regard sugar as a mundane and sometimes even troublesome substance linked to hyperactivity in children and other health concerns. Yet two hundred years ago American consumers treasured sugar as a rare commodity and consumed it only in small amounts. In Refined Tastes: Sugar, Confectionery, and Consumers in Nineteenth-Century America, Wendy A. Woloson demonstrates how the cultural role of sugar changed from being a precious luxury good to a ubiquitous necessity. Sugar became a social marker that established and reinforced class and gender differences. During the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Woloson explains, the social elite saw expensive sugar and sweet confections as symbols of their wealth. As refined sugar became more affordable and accessible, new confections—children’s candy, ice cream, and wedding cakes—made their way into American culture, acquiring a broad array of social meanings. Originally signifying male economic prowess, sugar eventually became associated with femininity and women’s consumerism. Woloson’s work offers a vivid account of this social transformation—along with the emergence of consumer culture in America. “Elegantly structured and beautifully written . . . As simply an explanation of how Americans became such avid consumers of sugar, this book is superb and can be recommended highly.” —Ken Albala, Winterthur Portfolio “An enlightening tale about the social identity of sweets, how they contain not just chewy centers but rich meanings about gender, about the natural world, and about consumerism.” —Cindy Ott, Enterprise and Society

Sugar and Power in the Dominican Republic

Sugar and Power in the Dominican Republic
Author: Michael R. Hall
Publsiher: Greenwood Publishing Group
Total Pages: 163
Release: 2000
ISBN: 9780313311277
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Sugar and Power in the Dominican Republic Book Excerpt:

Examines the powerful impact and development that the sugar industry had on U.S.-Dominican relations as the primary vehicle of reciprocal manipulation from 1958 to 1962.

A History of Global Consumption

A History of Global Consumption
Author: Ina Baghdiantz McCabe
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 312
Release: 2014-08-27
ISBN: 1317652657
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A History of Global Consumption Book Excerpt:

In A History of Global Consumption: 1500 – 1800, Ina Baghdiantz McCabe examines the history of consumption throughout the early modern period using a combination of chronological and thematic discussion, taking a comprehensive and wide-reaching view of a subject that has long been on the historical agenda. The title explores the topic from the rise of the collector in Renaissance Europe to the birth of consumption as a political tool in the eighteenth century. Beginning with an overview of the history of consumption and the major theorists, such as Bourdieu, Elias and Barthes, who have shaped its development as a field, Baghdiantz McCabe approaches the subject through a clear chronological framework. Supplemented by illlustrations in every chapter and ranging in scope from an analysis of the success of American commodities such as tobacco, sugar and chocolate in Europe and Asia to a discussion of the Dutch tulip mania, A History of Global Consumption: 1500 – 1800 is the perfect guide for all students interested in the social, cultural and economic history of the early modern period.

Sugar and Spice

Sugar and Spice
Author: Jon Stobart
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2016-12-01
ISBN: 0192515624
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Sugar and Spice Book Excerpt:

Consumers in eighteenth-century England were firmly embedded in an expanding world of goods, one that incorporated a range of novel foods (tobacco, chocolate, coffee, and tea) and new supplies of more established commodities, including sugar, spices, and dried fruits. Much has been written about the attraction of these goods, which went from being novelties or expensive luxuries in the mid-seventeenth century to central elements of the British diet a century or so later. They have been linked to the rise of Britain as a commercial and imperial power, whilst their consumption is seen as transforming many aspects of British society and culture, from mealtimes to gender identity. Despite this huge significance to ideas of consumer change, we know remarkably little about the everyday processes through which groceries were sold, bought, and consumed. In tracing the lines of supply that carried groceries from merchants to consumers, Sugar and Spice reveals how changes in retailing and shopping were central to the broader transformation of consumption and consumer practices, but also questions established ideas about the motivations underpinning consumer choices. It demonstrates the dynamic nature of eighteenth-century retailing; the importance of advertisements in promoting sales and shaping consumer perceptions, and the role of groceries in making shopping an everyday activity. At the same time, it shows how both retailers and their customers were influenced by the practicalities and pleasures of consumption. They were active agents in consumer change, shaping their own practices rather than caught up in a single socially-inclusive cultural project such as politeness or respectability.

Inhuman Bondage

Inhuman Bondage
Author: David Brion Davis
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 440
Release: 2008-06-05
ISBN: 0195339444
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Inhuman Bondage Book Excerpt:

The author's lifetime of insight as the leading authority on slavery in the Western world is summed up in this compelling narrative that links together the profits of slavery, the pain of the enslaved, and the legacy of racism in a sweeping and compelling history of the institution of slavery in the United States. By the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture.

The History of Everyday Life

The History of Everyday Life
Author: Alf Ludtke
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 318
Release: 1995-05-21
ISBN: 9780691008929
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The History of Everyday Life Book Excerpt:

Alltagsgeschichte, or the history of everyday life, emerged during the 1980s as the most interesting new field among West German historians and, more recently, their East German colleagues. Partly in reaction to the modernization theory pervading West German social history in the 1970s, practitioners of alltagsgeschichte stressed the complexities of popular experience, paying particular attention, for instance, to the relationship of the German working class to Nazism. Now the first English translation of a key volume of essays (Alltagsgeschichte: Zur Rekonstruktion historischer Erfahrungen und Lebensweisen) presents this approach and shows how it cuts across the boundaries of established disciplines. The result is a work of great methodological, theoretical, and historiographical significance as well as a substantive contribution to German studies. Introduced by Alf Lüdtke, the volume includes two empirical essays, one by Lutz Niethammer on life courses of East Germans after 1945 and one by Lüdtke on modes of accepting fascism among German workers. The remaining five essays are theoretical: Hans Medick writes on ethnological ways of knowledge as a challenge to social history; Peter Schöttler, on mentalities, ideologies, and discourses and alltagsgeschichte; Dorothee Wierling, on gender relations and alltagsgeschichte; Wolfgang Kaschuba, on popular culture and workers' culture as symbolic orders; and Harald Dehne on the challenge alltagsgeschichte posed for Marxist-Leninist historiography in East Germany.

Bad Foods

Bad Foods
Author: Michael E Oakes
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 145
Release: 2017-10-24
ISBN: 135132294X
Category: Medical
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Bad Foods Book Excerpt:

Bad Foods demonstrates how a variety of historical or political events and personalities have shaped our current views of good nutrition. On several occasions in American history concerns have arisen over the safety of our food supply (e.g., harmful ingredients in processed foods) and the potential that processing might deplete foods of their nutrients. These concerns help explain how food characteristics such as freshness, natural, organic, and unprocessed have become important to Americans. Bad Foods traces how the food nutrients fat, salt, and sugar have acquired negative reputations for health as well as any controversies and outright misconceptions of the dangers of these nutrients. Bad Foods also explores confusion that can in part be attributed to biased media coverage about foods. Modern Americans are routinely bombarded with information about the health value of certain foods and the dangers of others. Frequently, health information about certain nutrients receives exaggerated coverage (e.g., dietary fat) while the importance of other nutrients gets ignored (e.g., vitamins and minerals). Moreover, health information about foods is often perceived as contradictory. While some readers may be startled by what they perceive to be a challenge to sacred beliefs about foods, others will see the honesty in both the research and the writing and recognize the social benefits of examining our beliefs about foods. Bad Foods will be of interest to sociologists, food science specialists, and social historians.

Beyond the Fruited Plain

Beyond the Fruited Plain
Author: Kathryn Cornell Dolan
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2014-12
ISBN: 0803249888
Category: Business & Economics
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Beyond the Fruited Plain Book Excerpt:

Agriculture in the United States has changed dramatically in the last two hundred years. Economic transformation marked by the expansion of the industrial economy and big business has contributed to an increase in industrial food production. Amid this change, policymakers and cultural critics have debated the best way to produce food and wealth for an expanding population with imperialistic tendencies. In a sweeping overview, Beyond the Fruited Plain traces the connections between nineteenth-century literature, agriculture, and U.S. territorial and economic expansion. Bringing together theories of globalization and ecocriticism, Kathryn Cornell Dolan offers new readings on the texts of such literary figures as Herman Melville, Frank Norris, Mark Twain, Henry David Thoreau, and Harriet Beecher Stowe as they examine conflicts of food, labor, class, race, gender, and time—issues still influencing U.S. food politics today. Beyond the Fruited Plain shows how these authors use their literature to imagine agricultural alternatives to national practices and in so doing prefigure twenty-first-century concerns about globalization, resource depletion, food security, and the relation of industrial agriculture to pollution, disease, and climate change.

Consumption and the World of Goods

Consumption and the World of Goods
Author: John Brewer,Roy Porter
Publsiher: Psychology Press
Total Pages: 564
Release: 1994
ISBN: 9780415114783
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Consumption and the World of Goods Book Excerpt:

Provides an insight into the historical and cultural roots of mass consumerism.

Completing the Food Chain

Completing the Food Chain
Author: Paula M. Hirschoff
Publsiher: IRRI
Total Pages: 193
Release: 1989
ISBN: 9711042096
Category: Agricultural assistance
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Completing the Food Chain Book Excerpt:

Consumption and the Making of Respectability 1600 1800

Consumption and the Making of Respectability  1600 1800
Author: Woodruff D. Smith
Publsiher: Psychology Press
Total Pages: 339
Release: 2002
ISBN: 9780415933292
Category: Business & Economics
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Consumption and the Making of Respectability 1600 1800 Book Excerpt:

Tying together of several distinct cultural patterns during this century to create a culture of respectability and its impact on popular culture, trade, politics, social dynamics, and literature, this original and thoughtful work provides a comprehensive and much-needed understanding of the origins of modern consumption and all of its cultural implications.

Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology

Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology
Author: R. Jon McGee,Richard L. Warms
Publsiher: SAGE Publications
Total Pages: 1056
Release: 2013-08-28
ISBN: 1506307752
Category: Social Science
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology Book Excerpt:

Social and cultural anthropology and archaeology are rich subjects with deep connections in the social and physical sciences. Over the past 150 years, the subject matter and different theoretical perspectives have expanded so greatly that no single individual can command all of it. Consequently, both advanced students and professionals may be confronted with theoretical positions and names of theorists with whom they are only partially familiar, if they have heard of them at all. Students, in particular, are likely to turn to the web to find quick background information on theorists and theories. However, most web-based information is inaccurate and/or lacks depth. Students and professionals need a source to provide a quick overview of a particular theory and theorist with just the basics—the "who, what, where, how, and why," if you will. In response, SAGE Reference plans to publish the two-volume Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology: An Encyclopedia. Features & Benefits: Two volumes containing approximately 335 signed entries provide users with the most authoritative and thorough reference resource available on anthropology theory, both in terms of breadth and depth of coverage. To ease navigation between and among related entries, a Reader's Guide groups entries thematically and each entry is followed by Cross-References. In the electronic version, the Reader's Guide combines with the Cross-References and a detailed Index to provide robust search-and-browse capabilities. An appendix with a Chronology of Anthropology Theory allows students to easily chart directions and trends in thought and theory from early times to the present. Suggestions for Further Reading at the end of each entry and a Master Bibliography at the end guide readers to sources for more detailed research and discussion.

Citizen Coke The Making of Coca Cola Capitalism

Citizen Coke  The Making of Coca Cola Capitalism
Author: Bartow J. Elmore
Publsiher: W. W. Norton & Company
Total Pages: 432
Release: 2014-11-03
ISBN: 0393245934
Category: Business & Economics
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Citizen Coke The Making of Coca Cola Capitalism Book Excerpt:

"Citizen Coke demostrate[s] a complete lack of understanding about . . . the Coca-Cola system—past and present." —Ted Ryan, the Coca-Cola Company How did Coca-Cola build a global empire by selling a low-price concoction of mostly sugar, water, and caffeine? The easy answer is advertising, but the real formula to Coke’s success was its strategy, from the start, to offload costs and risks onto suppliers, franchisees, and the government. For most of its history the company owned no bottling plants, water sources, cane- or cornfields. A lean operation, it benefited from public goods like cheap municipal water and curbside recycling programs. Its huge appetite for ingredients gave it outsized influence on suppliers and congressional committees. This was Coca-Cola capitalism. In this new history Bartow J. Elmore explores Coke through its ingredients, showing how the company secured massive quantities of coca leaf, caffeine, sugar, and other inputs. Its growth was driven by shrewd leaders such as Asa Candler, who scaled an Atlanta soda-fountain operation into a national empire, and “boss” Robert Woodruff, who nurtured partnerships with companies like Hershey and Monsanto. These men, and the company they helped build, were seen as responsible citizens, bringing jobs and development to every corner of the globe. But as Elmore shows, Coke was usually getting the sweet end of the deal. It continues to do so. Alongside Coke’s recent public investments in water purification infrastructure, especially in Africa, it has also built—less publicly—a rash of bottling plants in dangerously arid regions. Looking past its message of corporate citizenship, Elmore finds a strategy of relentless growth. The costs shed by Coke have fallen on the public at large. Its annual use of many billions of gallons of water has strained an increasingly scarce global resource. Its copious servings of high-fructose corn syrup have threatened public health. Citizen Coke became a giant in a world of abundance. In a world of scarcity it is a strain on resources and all who depend on them.

Dietary Sugars and Health

Dietary Sugars and Health
Author: Michael I. Goran,Luc Tappy,Kim-Anne Le
Publsiher: CRC Press
Total Pages: 418
Release: 2014-12-10
ISBN: 1466593784
Category: Medical
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Dietary Sugars and Health Book Excerpt:

Sugar consumption is suspected to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, fatty liver disease, and some forms of cancers. Dietary sugars-fructose in particular-also have a potential role in obesity and metabolic diseases.Dietary Sugars and Health presents all aspects of dietary sugars as they relate to heal

Sugar and Civilization

Sugar and Civilization
Author: April Merleaux
Publsiher: UNC Press Books
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2015-07-13
ISBN: 1469622521
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Sugar and Civilization Book Excerpt:

In the weeks and months after the end of the Spanish-American War, Americans celebrated their nation's triumph by eating sugar. Each of the nation's new imperial possessions, from Puerto Rico to the Philippines, had the potential for vastly expanding sugar production. As victory parties and commemorations prominently featured candy and other sweets, Americans saw sugar as the reward for their global ambitions. April Merleaux demonstrates that trade policies and consumer cultures are as crucial to understanding U.S. empire as military or diplomatic interventions. As the nation's sweet tooth grew, people debated tariffs, immigration, and empire, all of which hastened the nation's rise as an international power. These dynamics played out in the bureaucracies of Washington, D.C., in the pages of local newspapers, and at local candy counters. Merleaux argues that ideas about race and civilization shaped sugar markets since government policies and business practices hinged on the racial characteristics of the people who worked the land and consumed its products. Connecting the history of sugar to its producers, consumers, and policy makers, Merleaux shows that the modern American sugar habit took shape in the shadow of a growing empire.

What Is a World

What Is a World
Author: Pheng Cheah
Publsiher: Duke University Press
Total Pages: 408
Release: 2016-01-01
ISBN: 0822374536
Category: Literary Criticism
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

What Is a World Book Excerpt:

In What Is a World? Pheng Cheah, a leading theorist of cosmopolitanism, offers the first critical consideration of world literature’s cosmopolitan vocation. Addressing the failure of recent theories of world literature to inquire about the meaning of world, Cheah articulates a normative theory of literature’s world-making power by creatively synthesizing four philosophical accounts of the world as a temporal process: idealism, Marxist materialism, phenomenology, and deconstruction. Literature opens worlds, he provocatively suggests, because it is a force of receptivity. Cheah compellingly argues for postcolonial literature’s exemplarity as world literature through readings of narrative fiction by Michelle Cliff, Amitav Ghosh, Nuruddin Farah, Ninotchka Rosca, and Timothy Mo that show how these texts open up new possibilities for remaking the world by negotiating with the inhuman force that gives time and deploying alternative temporalities to resist capitalist globalization.

Sweet Negotiations

Sweet Negotiations
Author: Russell R. Menard
Publsiher: University of Virginia Press
Total Pages: 181
Release: 2006
ISBN: 9780813925400
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Sweet Negotiations Book Excerpt:

Russell Menard argues that the emergence of black slavery in Barbados preceded the rise of sugar. He shows that Barbados was well on its way to becoming a plantation colony and a slave society before sugar emerged as the dominant crop. He sheds light on the origins of the integrated plantation, gang labour, and slave economy.

The Global Lives of Things

The Global Lives of Things
Author: Anne Gerritsen,Giorgio Riello
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 282
Release: 2015-11-19
ISBN: 1317374568
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Global Lives of Things Book Excerpt:

The Global Lives of Things considers the ways in which ‘things’, ranging from commodities to works of art and precious materials, participated in the shaping of global connections in the period 1400-1800. By focusing on the material exchange between Asia, Europe, the Americas and Australia, this volume traces the movements of objects through human networks of commerce, colonialism and consumption. It argues that material objects mediated between the forces of global economic exchange and the constantly changing identities of individuals, as they were drawn into global circuits. It proposes a reconceptualization of early modern global history in the light of its material culture by asking the question: what can we learn about the early modern world by studying its objects? This exciting new collection draws together the latest scholarship in the study of material culture and offers students a critique and explanation of the notion of commodity and a reinterpretation of the meaning of exchange. It engages with the concepts of ‘proto-globalization’, ‘the first global age’ and ‘commodities/consumption’. Divided into three parts, the volume considers in Part One, Objects of Global Knowledge, in Part Two, Objects of Global Connections, and finally, in Part Three, Objects of Global Consumption. The collection concludes with afterwords from three of the leading historians in the field, Maxine Berg, Suraiya Faroqhi and Paula Findlen, who offer their critical view of the methodologies and themes considered in the book and place its arguments within the wider field of scholarship. Extensively illustrated, and with chapters examining case studies from Northern Europe to China and Australia, this book will be essential reading for students of global history.

The Sugar Plantation in India and Indonesia

The Sugar Plantation in India and Indonesia
Author: Ulbe Bosma
Publsiher: Cambridge University Press
Total Pages: 323
Release: 2013-10-07
ISBN: 110703969X
Category: Business & Economics
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Sugar Plantation in India and Indonesia Book Excerpt:

European markets almost exclusively relied on Caribbean sugar produced by slave labor until abolitionist campaigns began around 1800. Thereafter, importing Asian sugar and transferring plantation production to Asia became a serious option for the Western world. In this book, Ulbe Bosma details how the British and Dutch introduced the sugar plantation model in Asia and refashioned it over time. Although initial attempts by British planters in India failed, the Dutch colonial administration was far more successful in Java, where it introduced in 1830 a system of forced cultivation that tied local peasant production to industrial manufacturing. A century later, India adopted the Java model in combination with farmers' cooperatives rather than employing coercive measures. Cooperatives did not prevent industrial sugar production from exploiting small farmers and cane cutters, however, and Bosma finds that much of modern sugar production in Asia resembles the abuses of labor by the old plantation systems of the Caribbean.