Ten Restaurants That Changed America

Ten Restaurants That Changed America
Author: Paul Freedman
Publsiher: Liveright Publishing
Total Pages: 528
Release: 2016-09-20
ISBN: 1631492462
Category: Cooking
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Ten Restaurants That Changed America Book Excerpt:

Featuring a new chapter on ten restaurants changing America today, a “fascinating . . . sweep through centuries of food culture” (Washington Post). Combining an historian’s rigor with a food enthusiast’s palate, Paul Freedman’s seminal and highly entertaining Ten Restaurants That Changed America reveals how the history of our restaurants reflects nothing less than the history of America itself. Whether charting the rise of our love affair with Chinese food through San Francisco’s fabled Mandarin; evoking the poignant nostalgia of Howard Johnson’s, the beloved roadside chain that foreshadowed the pandemic of McDonald’s; or chronicling the convivial lunchtime crowd at Schrafft’s, the first dining establishment to cater to women’s tastes, Freedman uses each restaurant to reveal a wider story of race and class, immigration and assimilation. “As much about the contradictions and contrasts in this country as it is about its places to eat” (The New Yorker), Ten Restaurants That Changed America is a “must-read” (Eater) that proves “essential for anyone who cares about where they go to dinner” (Wall Street Journal Magazine).

American Chinese Restaurants

American Chinese Restaurants
Author: Jenny Banh,Haiming Liu
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 310
Release: 2019-09-05
ISBN: 0429938896
Category: Business & Economics
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

American Chinese Restaurants Book Excerpt:

With case studies from the USA, Canada, Chile, and other countries in Latin America, American Chinese Restaurants examines the lived experiences of what it is like to work in a Chinese restaurant. The book provides ethnographic insights on small family businesses, struggling immigrant parents, and kids working, living, and growing up in an American Chinese restaurant. This is the first book based on personal histories to document and analyze the American Chinese restaurant world. New narratives by various international and American contributors have presented Chinese restaurants as dynamic agencies that raise questions on identity, ethnicity, transnationalism, industrialization, (post)modernity, assimilation, public and civic spheres, and socioeconomic differences. American Chinese Restaurants will be of interest to general readers, scholars, and college students from undergraduate to graduate level, who wish to know Chinese restaurant life and understand the relationship between food and society.

American Cuisine And How It Got This Way

American Cuisine  And How It Got This Way
Author: Paul Freedman
Publsiher: Liveright Publishing
Total Pages: 528
Release: 2019-10-15
ISBN: 1631494635
Category: Cooking
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

American Cuisine And How It Got This Way Book Excerpt:

With an ambitious sweep over two hundred years, Paul Freedman’s lavishly illustrated history shows that there actually is an American cuisine. For centuries, skeptical foreigners—and even millions of Americans—have believed there was no such thing as American cuisine. In recent decades, hamburgers, hot dogs, and pizza have been thought to define the nation’s palate. Not so, says food historian Paul Freedman, who demonstrates that there is an exuberant and diverse, if not always coherent, American cuisine that reflects the history of the nation itself. Combining historical rigor and culinary passion, Freedman underscores three recurrent themes—regionality, standardization, and variety—that shape a completely novel history of the United States. From the colonial period until after the Civil War, there was a patchwork of regional cooking styles that produced local standouts, such as gumbo from southern Louisiana, or clam chowder from New England. Later, this kind of regional identity was manipulated for historical effect, as in Southern cookbooks that mythologized gracious “plantation hospitality,” rendering invisible the African Americans who originated much of the region’s food. As the industrial revolution produced rapid changes in every sphere of life, the American palate dramatically shifted from local to processed. A new urban class clamored for convenient, modern meals and the freshness of regional cuisine disappeared, replaced by packaged and standardized products—such as canned peas, baloney, sliced white bread, and jarred baby food. By the early twentieth century, the era of homogenized American food was in full swing. Bolstered by nutrition “experts,” marketing consultants, and advertising executives, food companies convinced consumers that industrial food tasted fine and, more importantly, was convenient and nutritious. No group was more susceptible to the blandishments of advertisers than women, who were made feel that their husbands might stray if not satisfied with the meals provided at home. On the other hand, men wanted women to be svelte, sporty companions, not kitchen drudges. The solution companies offered was time-saving recipes using modern processed helpers. Men supposedly liked hearty food, while women were portrayed as fond of fussy, “dainty,” colorful, but tasteless dishes—tuna salad sandwiches, multicolored Jell-O, or artificial crab toppings. The 1970s saw the zenith of processed-food hegemony, but also the beginning of a food revolution in California. What became known as New American cuisine rejected the blandness of standardized food in favor of the actual taste and pleasure that seasonal, locally grown products provided. The result was a farm-to-table trend that continues to dominate. “A book to be savored” (Stephen Aron), American Cuisine is also a repository of anecdotes that will delight food lovers: how dry cereal was created by William Kellogg for people with digestive and low-energy problems; that chicken Parmesan, the beloved Italian favorite, is actually an American invention; and that Florida Key lime pie goes back only to the 1940s and was based on a recipe developed by Borden’s condensed milk. More emphatically, Freedman shows that American cuisine would be nowhere without the constant influx of immigrants, who have popularized everything from tacos to sushi rolls. “Impeccably researched, intellectually satisfying, and hugely readable” (Simon Majumdar), American Cuisine is a landmark work that sheds astonishing light on a history most of us thought we never had.

Red Sauce

Red Sauce
Author: Ian MacAllen
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 224
Release: 2022
ISBN: 1538162350
Category: Cooking, American
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Red Sauce Book Excerpt:

"A narrative social history tracing the evolution of traditional Italian American cuisine from its origins in Italy and its transformation in America into a distinct new cuisine"--

Taste Makers Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America

Taste Makers  Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America
Author: Mayukh Sen
Publsiher: W. W. Norton & Company
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2021-11-16
ISBN: 1324004525
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Taste Makers Seven Immigrant Women Who Revolutionized Food in America Book Excerpt:

A New York Times Editors' Choice pick Named a Best Book of the Year by NPR, Los Angeles Times, Vogue, Wall Street Journal, Food Network, KCRW, WBUR Here & Now, Emma Straub, and Globe and Mail One of the Millions's Most Anticipated Books of 2021 America’s modern culinary history told through the lives of seven pathbreaking chefs and food writers. Who’s really behind America’s appetite for foods from around the globe? This group biography from an electric new voice in food writing honors seven extraordinary women, all immigrants, who left an indelible mark on the way Americans eat today. Taste Makers stretches from World War II to the present, with absorbing and deeply researched portraits of figures including Mexican-born Elena Zelayeta, a blind chef; Marcella Hazan, the deity of Italian cuisine; and Norma Shirley, a champion of Jamaican dishes. In imaginative, lively prose, Mayukh Sen—a queer, brown child of immigrants—reconstructs the lives of these women in vivid and empathetic detail, daring to ask why some were famous in their own time, but not in ours, and why others shine brightly even today. Weaving together histories of food, immigration, and gender, Taste Makers will challenge the way readers look at what’s on their plate—and the women whose labor, overlooked for so long, makes those meals possible.

Classic Restaurants of New Orleans

Classic Restaurants of New Orleans
Author: Alexandra Kennon
Publsiher: Arcadia Publishing
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2019-11-04
ISBN: 1467142832
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Classic Restaurants of New Orleans Book Excerpt:

Every New Orleanian knows Leah Chase's gumbo, but few realize that the Freedom Fighters gathered and strategized over bowls of that very dish. Or that Parkway's roast beef po-boy originated in a streetcar conductors' strike. In a town where Antoine's Oysters Rockefeller is still served up by the founder's great-great-grandson, discover the chefs and restaurateurs who kept their gas flames burning through the Great Depression and Hurricane Katrina. Author Alexandra Kennon weaves the classic offerings of Creole grande dames together with contemporary neighborhood staples for a guide through the Crescent City's culinary soul. From Brennan's Bananas Foster to Galatoire's Souffle Potatoes, this collection also features a recipe from each restaurant, allowing readers to replicate iconic New Orleans cuisine at home.

Lost Restaurants of Providence

Lost Restaurants of Providence
Author: David Norton Stone
Publsiher: Arcadia Publishing
Total Pages: 192
Release: 2008-07-01
ISBN: 143966658X
Category: Cooking
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Lost Restaurants of Providence Book Excerpt:

A culinary history of Providence and the memorable eateries that once made their homes there. In the city that invented the diner, so many amazing restaurants remain only in memories. The Silver Top had fresh coffee every twenty minutes, and the Ever Ready was hot dog heaven. Miss Dutton's Green Room and the Shepard Tea Room beckoned shoppers in their Sunday finest. At Childs, the griddle chef made butter cakes in the window for night owls, and Harry Houdini supped at midnight with H.P. Lovecraft at the Waldorf Lunch. Themed lounges like the Beachcomber and the Bacchante Room chased away the Prohibition blues. Downcity Diner offered a famous meatloaf, and Ming Garden’s Ming Wings were a staple for regulars. Author David Norton Stone details the restaurants that still hold a place in the hearts of locals

The Lost Southern Chefs

The Lost Southern Chefs
Author: Robert F. Moss
Publsiher: University of Georgia Press
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2022-02-15
ISBN: 0820360848
Category: Cooking
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Lost Southern Chefs Book Excerpt:

In recent years, food writers and historians have begun to retell the story of southern food. Heirloom ingredients and traditional recipes have been rediscovered, the foundational role that African Americans played in the evolution of southern cuisine is coming to be recognized, and writers are finally clearing away the cobwebs of romantic myth that have long distorted the picture. The story of southern dining, however, remains incomplete. The Lost Southern Chefs begins to fill that niche by charting the evolution of commercial dining in the nineteenth-century South. Robert F. Moss punctures long-accepted notions that dining outside the home was universally poor, arguing that what we would today call “fine dining” flourished throughout the region as its towns and cities grew. Moss describes the economic forces and technological advances that revolutionized public dining, reshaped commercial pantries, and gave southerners who loved to eat a wealth of restaurants, hotel dining rooms, oyster houses, confectionery stores, and saloons. Most important, Moss tells the forgotten stories of the people who drove this culinary revolution. These men and women fully embodied the title “chef,” as they were the chiefs of their kitchens, directing large staffs, staging elaborate events for hundreds of guests, and establishing supply chains for the very best ingredients from across the expanding nation. Many were African Americans or recent immigrants from Europe, and they achieved culinary success despite great barriers and social challenges. These chefs and entrepreneurs became embroiled in the pitched political battles of Reconstruction and Jim Crow, and then their names were all but erased from history.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Food and Popular Culture

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Food and Popular Culture
Author: Kathleen Lebesco,Peter Naccarato
Publsiher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Total Pages: 368
Release: 2017-12-14
ISBN: 147429622X
Category: Social Science
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Food and Popular Culture Book Excerpt:

The influence of food has grown rapidly as it has become more and more intertwined with popular culture in recent decades. The Bloomsbury Handbook of Food and Popular Culture offers an authoritative, comprehensive overview of and introduction to this growing field of research. Bringing together over 20 original essays from leading experts, including Amy Bentley, Deborah Lupton, Fabio Parasecoli, and Isabelle de Solier, its impressive breadth and depth serves to define the field of food and popular culture. Divided into four parts, the book covers: - Media and Communication; including film, television, print media, the Internet, and emerging media - Material Cultures of Eating; including eating across the lifespan, home cooking, food retail, restaurants, and street food - Aesthetics of Food; including urban landscapes, museums, visual and performance arts - Socio-Political Considerations; including popular discourses around food science, waste, nutrition, ethical eating, and food advocacy Each chapter outlines key theories and existing areas of research whilst providing historical context and considering possible future developments. The Editors' Introduction by Kathleen LeBesco and Peter Naccarato, ensures cohesion and accessibility throughout. A truly interdisciplinary, ground-breaking resource, this book makes an invaluable contribution to the study of food and popular culture. It will be an essential reference work for students, researchers and scholars in food studies, film and media studies, communication studies, sociology, cultural studies, and American studies.

Lost Restaurants of Napa Valley and Their Recipes

Lost Restaurants of Napa Valley and Their Recipes
Author: Alexandria Brown
Publsiher: Arcadia Publishing
Total Pages: 192
Release: 2020-04-13
ISBN: 143966966X
Category: Cooking
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Lost Restaurants of Napa Valley and Their Recipes Book Excerpt:

Alongside its vineyards, the Napa Valley boasts restaurants celebrated for their pioneering spirit. Stroll through the memories of this region's mouthwatering eateries with tales of the enterprising women and risk takers who helped make Napa a foodie haven. The Empire Saloon made history by being the first business to serve food in the fledgling city of Napa, and a little over a century later, the Magnolia Hotel set the standard for fine dining in Yountville. The A-1 Café made Chinese cuisine a local favorite, and Jonesy's set the aviation community aflutter with its tasty special potatoes. Join author Alexandria Brown as she delves into the history of Napa County's gone-but-not-forgotten restaurants and their classic dishes.

Burn the Ice

Burn the Ice
Author: Kevin Alexander
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2019-07-09
ISBN: 0525558039
Category: Social Science
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Burn the Ice Book Excerpt:

"Inspiring"—Danny Meyer, CEO, Union Square Hospitality Group; Founder, Shake Shack; and author, Setting the Table James Beard Award-winning food journalist Kevin Alexander traces an exhilarating golden age in American dining Over the past decade, Kevin Alexander saw American dining turned on its head. Starting in 2006, the food world underwent a transformation as the established gatekeepers of American culinary creativity in New York City and the Bay Area were forced to contend with Portland, Oregon. Its new, no-holds-barred, casual fine-dining style became a template for other cities, and a culinary revolution swept across America. Traditional ramen shops opened in Oklahoma City. Craft cocktail speakeasies appeared in Boise. Poke bowls sprung up in Omaha. Entire neighborhoods, like Williamsburg in Brooklyn, and cities like Austin, were suddenly unrecognizable to long-term residents, their names becoming shorthand for the so-called hipster movement. At the same time, new media companies such as Eater and Serious Eats launched to chronicle and cater to this developing scene, transforming nascent star chefs into proper celebrities. Emerging culinary television hosts like Anthony Bourdain inspired a generation to use food as the lens for different cultures. It seemed, for a moment, like a glorious belle epoque of eating and drinking in America. And then it was over. To tell this story, Alexander journeys through the travails and triumphs of a number of key chefs, bartenders, and activists, as well as restaurants and neighborhoods whose fortunes were made during this veritable gold rush--including Gabriel Rucker, an originator of the 2006 Portland restaurant scene; Tom Colicchio of Gramercy Tavern and Top Chef fame; as well as hugely influential figures, such as André Prince Jeffries of Prince's Hot Chicken Shack in Nashville; and Carolina barbecue pitmaster Rodney Scott. He writes with rare energy, telling a distinctly American story, at once timeless and cutting-edge, about unbridled creativity and ravenous ambition. To "burn the ice" means to melt down whatever remains in a kitchen's ice machine at the end of the night. Or, at the bar, to melt the ice if someone has broken a glass in the well. It is both an end and a beginning. It is the firsthand story of a revolution in how Americans eat and drink.

Getting What We Need Ourselves

Getting What We Need Ourselves
Author: Jennifer Jensen Wallach, author of How America Eats: A Social History of US Food and Culture
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2019-06-01
ISBN: 1538125250
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Getting What We Need Ourselves Book Excerpt:

This multi-generational story begins before the transatlantic slave trade in West Africa and ends with a discussion of contemporary African American vegans. Demonstrating that food has been both a tool of empowerment and a weapon of white supremacy, this study documents the symbolic power of food alongside an ongoing struggle for food access.

Dining Out

Dining Out
Author: Katie Rawson,Elliott Shore
Publsiher: Reaktion Books
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2019-08-12
ISBN: 1789140951
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Dining Out Book Excerpt:

A global history of restaurants beyond white tablecloths and maître d’s, Dining Out presents restaurants both as businesses and as venues for a range of human experiences. From banquets in twelfth-century China to the medicinal roots of French restaurants, the origins of restaurants are not singular—nor is the history this book tells. Katie Rawson and Elliott Shore highlight stories across time and place, including how chifa restaurants emerged from the migration of Chinese workers and their marriage to Peruvian businesswomen in nineteenth-century Peru; how Alexander Soyer transformed kitchen chemistry by popularizing the gas stove, pre-dating the pyrotechnics of molecular gastronomy by a century; and how Harvey Girls dispelled the ill repute of waiting tables, making rich lives for themselves across the American West. From restaurant architecture to technological developments, staffing and organization, tipping and waiting table, ethnic cuisines, and slow and fast foods, this delectably illustrated and profoundly informed and entertaining history takes us from the world’s first restaurants in Kaifeng, China, to the latest high-end dining experiences.

Postcards from the Baja California Border

Postcards from the Baja California Border
Author: Daniel D. Arreola
Publsiher: University of Arizona Press
Total Pages: 387
Release: 2021-10-05
ISBN: 0816542554
Category: Antiques & Collectibles
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Postcards from the Baja California Border Book Excerpt:

Postcards from the Baja California Border uses popular historical imagery--the vintage postcard--to tell a compelling, visually enriched geographical story about the border towns of Baja California.

Food in Time and Place

Food in Time and Place
Author: Paul Freedman,Joyce E. Chaplin,Ken Albala
Publsiher: University of California Press
Total Pages: 424
Release: 2014-10-31
ISBN: 0520283589
Category: Cooking
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Food in Time and Place Book Excerpt:

Food and cuisine are important subjects for historians across many areas of study. Food, after all, is one of the most basic human needs and a foundational part of social and cultural histories. Such topics as famines, food supply, nutrition, and public health are addressed by historians specializing in every era and every nation. Food in Time and Place delivers an unprecedented review of the state of historical research on food, endorsed by the American Historical Association, providing readers with a geographically, chronologically, and topically broad understanding of food cultures—from ancient Mediterranean and medieval societies to France and its domination of haute cuisine. Teachers, students, and scholars in food history will appreciate coverage of different thematic concerns, such as transfers of crops, conquest, colonization, immigration, and modern forms of globalization.

A Place at the Nayarit

A Place at the Nayarit
Author: Natalia Molina
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 318
Release: 2022-04-19
ISBN: 0520385497
Category: History
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

A Place at the Nayarit Book Excerpt:

In a world that sought to reduce Mexican immigrants to invisible labor, the Nayarit was a place where people could become visible once again, where they could speak out, claim space, and belong. In 1951, Doña Natalia Barraza opened the Nayarit, a Mexican restaurant in Echo Park, Los Angeles. With A Place at the Nayarit, historian Natalia Molina traces the life’s work of her grandmother, remembered by all who knew her as Doña Natalia––a generous, reserved, and extraordinarily capable woman. Doña Natalia immigrated alone from Mexico to L.A., adopted two children, and ran a successful business. She also sponsored, housed, and employed dozens of other immigrants, encouraging them to lay claim to a city long characterized by anti-Latinx racism. Together, the employees and customers of the Nayarit maintained ties to their old homes while providing one another safety and support. The Nayarit was much more than a popular eating spot: it was an urban anchor for a robust community, a gathering space where ethnic Mexican workers and customers connected with their patria chica (their “small country”). That meant connecting with distinctive tastes, with one another, and with the city they now called home. Through deep research and vivid storytelling, Molina follows restaurant workers from the kitchen and the front of the house across borders and through the decades. These people's stories illuminate the many facets of the immigrant experience: immigrants' complex networks of family and community and the small but essential pleasures of daily life, as well as cross-currents of gender and sexuality and pressures of racism and segregation. The Nayarit was a local landmark, popular with both Hollywood stars and restaurant workers from across the city and beloved for its fresh, traditionally prepared Mexican food. But as Molina argues, it was also, and most importantly, a place where ethnic Mexicans and other Latinx L.A. residents could step into the fullness of their lives, nourishing themselves and one another. A Place at the Nayarit is a stirring exploration of how racialized minorities create a sense of belonging. It will resonate with anyone who has felt like an outsider and had a special place where they felt like an insider.

Creole Italian

Creole Italian
Author: Justin A. Nystrom
Publsiher: University of Georgia Press
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2018-08-01
ISBN: 0820353574
Category: Cooking
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Creole Italian Book Excerpt:

In Creole Italian, Justin A. Nystrom explores the influence Sicilian immigrants have had on New Orleans foodways. His culinary journey follows these immigrants from their first impressions on Louisiana food culture in the mid-1830s and along their path until the 1970s. Each chapter touches on events that involved Sicilian immigrants and the relevancy of their lives and impact on New Orleans. Sicilian immigrants cut sugarcane, sold groceries, ran truck farms, operated bars and restaurants, and manufactured pasta. Citing these cultural confluences, Nystrom posits that the significance of Sicilian influence on New Orleans foodways traditionally has been undervalued and instead should be included, along with African, French, and Spanish cuisine, in the broad definition of “creole.” Creole Italian chronicles how the business of food, broadly conceived, dictated the reasoning, means, and outcomes for a large portion of the nearly forty thousand Sicilian immigrants who entered America through the port of New Orleans in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries and how their actions and those of their descendants helped shape the food town we know today.

Designing San Francisco

Designing San Francisco
Author: Alison Isenberg
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 432
Release: 2017-08-29
ISBN: 0691172544
Category: Architecture
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Designing San Francisco Book Excerpt:

A major new urban history of the design and development of postwar San Francisco Designing San Francisco is the untold story of the formative postwar decades when U.S. cities took their modern shape amid clashing visions of the future. In this pathbreaking and richly illustrated book, Alison Isenberg shifts the focus from architects and city planners—those most often hailed in histories of urban development and design—to the unsung artists, activists, and others who played pivotal roles in rebuilding San Francisco between the 1940s and the 1970s. Previous accounts of midcentury urban renewal have focused on the opposing terms set down by Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs—put simply, development versus preservation—and have followed New York City models. Now Isenberg turns our attention west to colorful, pioneering, and contentious San Francisco, where unexpectedly fierce battles were waged over iconic private and public projects like Ghirardelli Square, Golden Gateway, and the Transamerica Pyramid. When large-scale redevelopment came to low-rise San Francisco in the 1950s, the resulting rivalries and conflicts sparked the proliferation of numerous allied arts fields and their professionals, including architectural model makers, real estate publicists, graphic designers, photographers, property managers, builders, sculptors, public-interest lawyers, alternative press writers, and preservationists. Isenberg explores how these centrally engaged arts professionals brought new ideas to city, regional, and national planning and shaped novel projects across urban, suburban, and rural borders. San Francisco’s rebuilding galvanized far-reaching critiques of the inequitable competition for scarce urban land, and propelled debates over responsible public land stewardship. Isenberg challenges many truisms of this renewal era—especially the presumed male domination of postwar urban design, showing how women collaborated in city building long before feminism’s impact in the 1970s. An evocative portrait of one of the world’s great cities, Designing San Francisco provides a new paradigm for understanding past and present struggles to define the urban future.

Food in Memory and Imagination

Food in Memory and Imagination
Author: Beth Forrest,Greg de St. Maurice
Publsiher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2022-01-13
ISBN: 1350096172
Category: Social Science
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Food in Memory and Imagination Book Excerpt:

How do we engage with food through memory and imagination? This expansive volume spans time and space to illustrate how, through food, people have engaged with the past, the future, and their alternative presents. Beth M. Forrest and Greg de St. Maurice have brought together first-class contributions, from both established and up-and-coming scholars, to consider how imagination and memory intertwine and sometimes diverge. Chapters draw on cases around the world-including Iran, Italy, Japan, Kenya, and the US-and include topics such as national identity, food insecurity, and the phenomenon of knowledge. Contributions represent a range of disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. This volume is a veritable feast for the contemporary food studies scholar.

Why Food Matters

Why Food Matters
Author: Paul Freedman
Publsiher: Yale University Press
Total Pages: 216
Release: 2021-09-28
ISBN: 030025377X
Category: Social Science
Language: EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Why Food Matters Book Excerpt:

An award-winning historian makes the case for food's cultural importance, stressing its crucial role throughout human history