The Black Infantry In The West 1869 1891

Author by : Arlen L. Fowler
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 61
Total Download : 597
File Size : 45,5 Mb
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Description : Records the fight against lawlessness carried on by the Twenty-Fourth and Twenty-Fifth infantries, composed of African American men, who were a part of a government experiment in the West.


Buffalo Soldier Regiment

Author by : John Henry Nankivell
Languange : en
Publisher by : U of Nebraska Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 19
Total Download : 229
File Size : 49,5 Mb
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Description : Personal recollections and official documents record the history, service, exploits, travels, traditions, and battles with racism experienced by one of the units comprising a black infantry regiment from 1869 to 1926.


Buffalo Soldiers In The West

Author by : Bruce A. Glasrud
Languange : en
Publisher by : Texas A&M University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 25
Total Download : 592
File Size : 44,5 Mb
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Description : In the decades following the Civil War, scores of African Americans served in the U.S. Army in the West. The Plains Indians dubbed them buffalo soldiers, and their record in the infantry and cavalry, a record full of dignity and pride, provides one of the most fascinating chapters in the history of the era. This anthology focuses on the careers and accomplishments of black soldiers, the lives they developed for themselves, their relationships to their officers (most of whom were white), their specialized roles (such as that of the Black Seminoles), and the discrimination they faced from the very whites they were trying to protect. In short, this volume offers important insights into the social, cultural, and communal lives of the buffalo soldiers. The selections are written by prominent scholars who have delved into the history of black soldiers in the West. Previously published in scattered journals, the articles are gathered here for the first time in a single volume, providing a rich and accessible resource for students, scholars, and interested general readers. Additionally, the readings in this volume serve in some ways as commentaries on each other, offering in this collected format a cumulative mosaic that was only fragmentary before. Volume editors Glasrud and Searles provide introductions to the volume and to each of its four parts, surveying recent scholarship and offering an interpretive framework. The bibliography that closes the book will also commend itself as a valuable tool for further research.


Sweet Freedom S Plains

Author by : Shirley Ann Wilson Moore
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 84
Total Download : 621
File Size : 52,8 Mb
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Description : The westward migration of nearly half a million Americans in the mid-nineteenth century looms large in U.S. history. Classic images of rugged Euro-Americans traversing the plains in their prairie schooners still stir the popular imagination. But this traditional narrative, no matter how alluring, falls short of the actual—and far more complex—reality of the overland trails. Among the diverse peoples who converged on the western frontier were African American pioneers—men, women, and children. Whether enslaved or free, they too were involved in this transformative movement. Sweet Freedom’s Plains is a powerful retelling of the migration story from their perspective. Tracing the journeys of black overlanders who traveled the Mormon, California, Oregon, and other trails, Shirley Ann Wilson Moore describes in vivid detail what they left behind, what they encountered along the way, and what they expected to find in their new, western homes. She argues that African Americans understood advancement and prosperity in ways unique to their situation as an enslaved and racially persecuted people, even as they shared many of the same hopes and dreams held by their white contemporaries. For African Americans, the journey westward marked the beginning of liberation and transformation. At the same time, black emigrants’ aspirations often came into sharp conflict with real-world conditions in the West. Although many scholars have focused on African Americans who settled in the urban West, their early trailblazing voyages into the Oregon Country, Utah Territory, New Mexico Territory, and California deserve greater attention. Having combed censuses, maps, government documents, and white overlanders’ diaries, along with the few accounts written by black overlanders or passed down orally to their living descendants, Moore gives voice to the countless, mostly anonymous black men and women who trekked the plains and mountains. Sweet Freedom’s Plains places African American overlanders where they belong—at the center of the western migration narrative. Their experiences and perspectives enhance our understanding of this formative period in American history.


Black Soldier White Army

Author by : William T. Bowers
Languange : en
Publisher by : DIANE Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 35
Total Download : 202
File Size : 44,8 Mb
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Description : The history of the 24th Infantry regiment in Korea is a difficult one, both for the veterans of the unit & for the Army. This book tells both what happened to the 24th Infantry, & why it happened. The Army must be aware of the corrosive effects of segregation & the racial prejudices that accompanied it. The consequences of the system crippled the trust & mutual confidence so necessary among the soldiers & leaders of combat units & weakened the bonds that held the 24th together, producing profound effects on the battlefield. Tables, maps & illustrations.


Brothers To The Buffalo Soldiers

Author by : Bruce A. Glasrud
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Missouri Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 30
Total Download : 326
File Size : 50,6 Mb
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Description : During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, African American men were seldom permitted to join the United States armed forces. There had been times in early U.S. history when black and white men fought alongside one another; it was not uncommon for integrated units to take to battle in the Revolutionary War. But by the War of 1812, the United States had come to maintain what one writer called “a whitewashed army.” Yet despite that opposition, during the early 1800s, militia units made up of free black soldiers came together to aid the official military troops in combat. Many black Americans continued to serve in times of military need. Nearly 180,000 African Americans served in units of the U.S. Colored Troops during the Civil War, and others, from states such as Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Missouri, and Kansas, participated in state militias organized to protect local populations from threats of Confederate invasion. As such, the Civil War was a turning point in the acceptance of black soldiers for national defense. By 1900, twenty-two states and the District of Columbia had accepted black men into some form of military service, usually as state militiamen—brothers to the “buffalo soldiers” of the regular army regiments, but American military men regardless. Little has been published about them, but Brothers to the Buffalo Soldiers: Perspectives on the African American Militia and Volunteers, 1865–1919, offers insights into the varied experiences of black militia units in the post–Civil War period. The book includes eleven articles that focus either on “Black Participation in the Militia” or “Black Volunteer Units in the War with Spain.” The articles, collected and introduced by author and scholar Bruce A. Glasrud, provide an overview of the history of early black citizen-soldiers and offer criticism from prominent academics interested in that experience. Brothers to the Buffalo Soldiers discusses a previously little-known aspect of the black military experience in U.S. history, while deliberating on the discrimination these men faced both within and outside the military. Chosen on the bases of scholarship, balance, and readability, these articles provide a rare composite picture of the black military man’s life during this period. Brothers to the Buffalo Soldiers offers both a valuable introductory text for students of military studies and a solid source of material for African American historians.


The Buffalo Soldiers Their Epic Story And Major Campaigns

Author by : Debra J. Sheffer Ph.D.
Languange : en
Publisher by : ABC-CLIO
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 47
Total Download : 294
File Size : 49,7 Mb
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Description : This riveting narrative focuses on the Buffalo Soldiers, tracing the legacy of black military service and its social, economic, and political impact from the colonial era through the end of the 19th century. • Illustrates the events leading to the original formation of the Buffalo Soldiers • Examines the wars, campaigns, and battles in which the Buffalo Soldiers served significant roles, with a focus on the Indian Wars of the American frontier • Covers the American Revolution, the First Seminole War, the War of 1812, the Second Seminole War, the American Civil War, the Indian Campaigns, the Spanish-American War, the Philippine Insurrection, the Punitive Expedition, World War I, World War II, and the Korean War • Addresses the political, social, economic, and military conditions under which the Buffalo Soldiers served in America


Black Slaves Indian Masters

Author by : Barbara Krauthamer
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNC Press Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 60
Total Download : 409
File Size : 51,7 Mb
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Description : From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.


The Ordeal Of The Reunion

Author by : Mark Wahlgren Summers
Languange : en
Publisher by : UNC Press Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 23
Total Download : 960
File Size : 43,9 Mb
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Description : For a generation, scholarship on the Reconstruction era has rightly focused on the struggles of the recently emancipated for a meaningful freedom and defined its success or failure largely in those terms. In The Ordeal of the Reunion, Mark Wahlgren Summers goes beyond this vitally important question, focusing on Reconstruction's need to form an enduring Union without sacrificing the framework of federalism and republican democracy. Assessing the era nationally, Summers emphasizes the variety of conservative strains that confined the scope of change, highlights the war's impact and its aftermath, and brings the West and foreign policy into an integrated narrative. In sum, this book offers a fresh explanation for Reconstruction's demise and a case for its essential successes as well as its great failures. Indeed, this book demonstrates the extent to which the victors' aims in 1865 were met--and at what cost. Summers depicts not just a heroic, tragic moment with equal rights advanced and then betrayed but a time of achievement and consolidation, in which nationhood and emancipation were placed beyond repeal and the groundwork was laid for a stronger, if not better, America to come.


Phil Sheridan And His Army

Author by : Paul Andrew Hutton
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 47
Total Download : 194
File Size : 40,7 Mb
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Description : "Paul Hutton’s study of Phil Sheridan in the West is authoritative, readable, and an important contribution to the literature of westward expansion. Although headquartered in Chicago, Sheridan played a crucial role in the opening of the West. His command stretched from the Missouri to the Rockies and from Mexico to Canada, and all the Indian Wars of the Great Plains fell under his direction. Hutton ably narrates and interprets Sheridan’s western career from the perspective of the top command rather than the battlefield leader. His book is good history and good reading."–Robert M. Utley