The Great Fire Of London Of 1666

Author by : Magdalena Alagna
Languange : en
Publisher by : The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 75
Total Download : 488
File Size : 50,5 Mb
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Description : Recounts the events leading up to the 1666 fire that destroyed most of London, tracing its course and aftermath, as well as the city's recovery.


History Of The Plague In London 1665

Author by : Daniel Defoe
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 39
Total Download : 998
File Size : 41,6 Mb
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Description :


The Great Fire Of London

Author by : Samuel Pepys
Languange : en
Publisher by : Penguin UK
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 287
File Size : 49,6 Mb
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Description : 'With one's face in the wind you were almost burned with a shower of Firedrops' A selection from Pepys' startlingly vivid and candid diary, including his famous account of the Great Fire Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin's 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions. Samuel Pepys (1633-1703). The Diary of Samuel Pepys: A Selection is available in Penguin Classics


The Great Fire Of London In 1666

Author by : Walter George Bell
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 56
Total Download : 560
File Size : 48,8 Mb
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Description :


The Great Fire Of London

Author by : Neil Hanson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Turner Publishing Company
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 27
Total Download : 782
File Size : 40,9 Mb
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Description : The tragic story of the disastrous London fire is told here from both a human and architectural point of view, as the fire destroyed lives along with buildings such as the original St. Paul's cathedral.


The Great Fire Of London

Author by : Emma Adams
Languange : en
Publisher by : Hachette UK
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 74
Total Download : 830
File Size : 53,7 Mb
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Description : In 1666, London's citizens woke to see the skyline above their city's cramped wooden houses ablaze. The Great Fire of London is a hauntingly beautiful visual re-telling of one of the most well-known disasters in the city's history. To commemorate the 350th anniversary of the fire, powerful and sumptuous drawings from the new east London illustrator, James Weston Lewis, bring the events of November 1666 to life in this stunning gift book. Lewis's drawings take readers on a journey, from the single smouldering coal that falls out of the baker's oven to the swirling clouds of ash that engulf the city and then in to the very heart of the fire itself. As the pages turn, you can witness London burning to the ground and then rebuilding again. Children will love examining the rich detail of each spread, from the detailed city map to the drawings of London before, during and after the fire took hold. This book takes the dramatic historical information surrounding the Great Fire of London and transforms it into a breathtaking story that will transfix readers of all ages.


The Great Fire Of London

Author by : Stewart Ross
Languange : en
Publisher by : Evans Brothers
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 75
Total Download : 475
File Size : 43,7 Mb
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Description : An important historical moment in introduced in the context of both what led up to the fire and the changes that occurred as a result of it Children are introduced to words associated with buildings and fire and learn about the role of eyewitnesses in historical events in this guide to the Great Fire of London and how we came to know about it today. Using historical paintings, a timeline, and a simple map, children can discover why the fire started, how it spread, and the damage it caused. Included are activities that further encourage visual literacy and relate to the use of historical evidence sources.


All About The Great Fire Of London 1666

Author by : Pam Robson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Wayland
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 27
Total Download : 383
File Size : 46,9 Mb
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Description : London, Saturday 1 September 1666: lumbering wagons squeeze their way through the narrow streets, with fights often breaking out between drivers over right of way. Wooden bollards line the street; pavements have yet to be built. Filth and sewage lays waiting to be cleared by 'rakers', stinking in the hot dry weather. An easterly wind arises. At some time after midnight the Great Fire began. A great introduction to the Great Fire of London for children at KS1 and KS2 that includes extracts from Samuel Pepys' diary, photographs of historical artifacts and a look at fire fighting before the fire broke out and after.


Vlad And The Great Fire Of London

Author by : Kate Cunningham
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 288
File Size : 41,8 Mb
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Description : Vlad and the Great Fire of London is a full colour, 32 page fiction picture book. Supporting the KS1 English National Curriculum topic it is narrated by Vlad the flea. Vlad and his friend, Boxton the rat are living in London when one night by witness the start of the fire that destroys most of the City of London. The book also contains a fact file.


The Great Fire Of London

Author by : Charles River Charles River Editors
Languange : en
Publisher by : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 52
Total Download : 495
File Size : 40,7 Mb
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Description : *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fire written by survivors and government officials *Includes a bibliography for further reading "[A] wooden, northern, and inartificial congestion of Houses." - John Evelyn's description of London before the fire "So I was called for, and did tell the King and Duke of York what I saw, and that unless His Majesty did command houses to be pulled down nothing could stop the fire. They seemed much troubled, and the King commanded me to go to my Lord Mayor from him, and command him to spare no houses, but to pull down before the fire every way." - Samuel Pepys In the 17th century, the people of London could boast that they had developed some of the most advanced firefighting technology and methods in the world, including the use of primitive fire engines. There were even vendors of such machines who advertised in papers of their machines' abilities to quench great fires. Of course, even with trained firefighters and new devices, the most skillful efforts could still prove limited in the face of a giant fire, as Rome had learned over 1500 years earlier and as Chicago would learn nearly 200 years later. In fact, one of the primary reasons London developed ways to fight fires was the fact that the city was particularly vulnerable. Although London was over 1500 years old and sat at the heart of the British Empire, most of the buildings were made of wood, and the city was overcrowded, in part due to the fact that city planners worked with and around the ancient Roman fortifications that had been constructed to defend it. As such, while there were spacious areas for the elite and rich outside of the city, London itself had narrow streets full of wood buildings that were practically on top of each other. With some bad luck and bad timing, a potential disaster awaited the city, and that finally came in September 1666. As it turned out, the Great Fire of London was so bad that one author who studied the blaze described it as "the perfect fire," referring to the convergence in the largest city in England of spark, wood and wind in such a way that no one could stop the fire or even fight it effectively. John Evelyn, who had warned of the potential for a devastating fire given the layout of the city, noted that people seemed so stunned by the scope of the fire that they didn't know what to do: "The conflagration was so universal, and the people so astonished, that from the beginning, I know not by what despondency or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it, so that there was nothing heard or seen but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures without at all attempting to save even their goods, such a strange consternation there was upon them." While the fire quickly spread throughout the heart of the city, the only thing that saved London's suburbs was an ancient wall built around the city to keep the enemies of Rome out, not the fire in. By the time it was finished, most of the city's homes and churches lay in ashes, and nearly 90% of the city's citizens were left homeless. The only consolation taken away from the devastation was an astonishing low death rate; although London had about 80,000 residents, only a handful died as the fire raged across the city. The fire lasted three days, and by the end of it, Londoners were shocked by the wide-scale destruction, which was so great that Samuel Pepys remarked, "It made me weep to see it." In the aftermath, people looked for scapegoats, ranging from King Charles II to the Pope and his Catholic supporters, while England's leaders looked to rebuild the city. The civil and foreign strife ultimately posed obstacles to new plans to rebuild London, which actually meant that the rebuilding efforts were designed in ways that mimicked the old layout that had invited such a disaster in the first place.