The Harlem Renaissance In Black And White

Author by : George Hutchinson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Harvard University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 18
Total Download : 668
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Description : By restoring interracial dimensions left out of accounts of the Harlem Renaissance--or blamed for corrupting it--George Hutchinson transforms our understanding of black (and white) literary modernism, interracial literary relations, and twentieth-century cultural nationalism in the United States.


Carl Van Vechten And The Harlem Renaissance

Author by : Emily Bernard
Languange : en
Publisher by : Yale University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 66
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File Size : 48,8 Mb
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Description : Carl Van Vechten was a white man with a passion for blackness who played a crucial role in helping the Harlem Renaissance, a black movement, come to understand itself. Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance is grounded in the dramas occasioned by the Harlem Renaissance, as it is called today, or New Negro Renaissance, as it was called in the 1920s, when it first came into being. Emily Bernard focuses on writing—the black and white of things—the articles, fiction, essays, and letters that Carl Van Vechten wrote to black people and about black culture, and the writing of the black people who wrote to and about him. Above all, she is interested in the interpersonal exchanges that inspired the writing, which are ultimately far more significant than the public records would suggest. This book is a partial biography of a once controversial figure. It is not a comprehensive history of an entire life, but rather a chronicle of one of his lives, his black life, which began in his boyhood and thrived until his death. The narrative at the core of Carl Van Vechten and the Harlem Renaissance is not an attempt to answer the question of whether Van Vechten was good or bad for black people, or whether or not he hurt or helped black creative expression during the Harlem Renaissance. As Bernard writes, the book instead “enlarges that question into something much richer and more nuanced: a tale about the messy realities of race, and the complicated tangle of black and white.”


Black Culture And The Harlem Renaissance

Author by : Cary D. Wintz
Languange : en
Publisher by : Texas A & M University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 72
Total Download : 140
File Size : 45,5 Mb
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Description : Harlem symbolized the urbanization of black America in the 1920s and 1930s. Home to the largest concentration of African Americans who settled outside the South, it spawned the literary and artistic movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. Its writers were in the vanguard of an attempt to come to terms with black urbanization. They lived it and wrote about it. First published in 1988, Black Culture and the Harlem Renaissance examines the relationship between the community and its literature. Author Cary Wintz analyzes the movement’s emergence within the framework of the black social and intellectual history of early twentieth-century America. He begins with Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, and others whose work broke barriers for the Renaissance writers to come. With an emphasis on social issues—like writers and politics, the role of black women, and the interplay between black writers and the white community—Wintz traces the rise and fall of the movement. Of special interest is material from the Knopf Collection and the papers of several Renaissance figures acquired by the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. It reveals much of interest about the relationship between the publishing world, its writers, and their patrons—both black and white.


Modernism And The Harlem Renaissance

Author by : Houston A. Baker
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 53
Total Download : 793
File Size : 49,9 Mb
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Description : Discusses the Harlem Renaissance as a crucial moment in the Afro-American form of expression.


The Harlem Renaissance

Author by : Harold Bloom
Languange : en
Publisher by : Infobase Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 43
Total Download : 307
File Size : 51,9 Mb
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Description : Harlem in the 1920s and '30s was the epicenter of a flourishing in African-American literature with the poetry and prose of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Claude McKay, to name a few. This volume examines the defining themes and styles of African-American literature during this period, which laid the groundwork for contemporary African-American writers.


The Ideologies Of African American Literature

Author by : Robert E. Washington
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 664
File Size : 49,7 Mb
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Description : This book challenges the long-held assumption that African American literature aptly reflects black American social consciousness. Offering a novel sociological approach, Washington delineates the social and political forces that shaped the leading black literary works. Washington shows that deep divisions between political thinkers and writers prevailed throughout the 20th century. Visit our website for sample chapters!


Gay Voices Of The Harlem Renaissance

Author by : A. B. Christa Schwarz
Languange : en
Publisher by : Indiana University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 20
Total Download : 514
File Size : 47,8 Mb
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Description : "Heretofore scholars have not been willing—perhaps, even been unable for many reasons both academic and personal—to identify much of the Harlem Renaissance work as same-sex oriented.... An important book." —Jim Elledge This groundbreaking study explores the Harlem Renaissance as a literary phenomenon fundamentally shaped by same-sex-interested men. Christa Schwarz focuses on Countée Cullen, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Richard Bruce Nugent and explores these writers' sexually dissident or gay literary voices. The portrayals of men-loving men in these writers' works vary significantly. Schwarz locates in the poetry of Cullen, Hughes, and McKay the employment of contemporary gay code words, deriving from the Greek discourse of homosexuality and from Walt Whitman. By contrast, Nugent—the only "out" gay Harlem Renaissance artist—portrayed men-loving men without reference to racial concepts or Whitmanesque codes. Schwarz argues for contemporary readings attuned to the complex relation between race, gender, and sexual orientation in Harlem Renaissance writing.


Hip Hop S Inheritance

Author by : Reiland Rabaka
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lexington Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 70
Total Download : 632
File Size : 47,7 Mb
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Description : Hip Hop's Inheritance arguably offers the first book-length treatment of what hip hop culture has, literally, 'inherited' from the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts movement, the Feminist Art movement, and 1980s and 1990s postmodern aesthetics. By comparing and contrasting the major motifs of the aforementioned cultural aesthetic traditions with those of hip hop culture, all the while critically exploring the origins and evolution of black popular culture from antebellum America through to 'Obama's America,' Hip Hop's Inheritance demonstrates that the Hip Hop generation is not the first generation of young black folk preoccupied with spirituality and sexuality, race and religion, entertainment and athletics, or ghetto culture and bourgeois culture.


Novels Of The Harlem Renaissance

Author by : Amritjit Singh
Languange : en
Publisher by : Penn State Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 66
Total Download : 969
File Size : 55,9 Mb
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Description :


In Search Of Nella Larsen

Author by : George Hutchinson
Languange : en
Publisher by : Harvard University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 86
Total Download : 448
File Size : 53,9 Mb
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Description : Born to a Danish seamstress and a black West Indian cook, Nella Larsen lived her life in the shadows of America's racial divide. Her writings about that life, briefly celebrated in her time, were lost to later generations--only to be rediscovered and hailed by many. In his search for Nella Larsen, George Hutchinson exposes the truths and half-truths surrounding her, as well as the complex reality they mask and mirror. His book is a cultural biography of the color line as it was lived by one person who truly embodied all of its ambiguities and complexities.