The Irish Americans

Author by : Jay P. Dolan
Languange : en
Publisher by : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
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Description : Jay Dolan of Notre Dame University is one of America's most acclaimed scholars of immigration and ethnic history. In THE IRISH AMERICANS, he caps his decades of writing and teaching with this magisterial history of the Irish experience in the United States. Although more than 30 million Americans claim Irish ancestry, no other general account of Irish American history has been published since the 1960s. Dolan draws on his own original research and much other recent scholarship to weave an insightful, colorful narrative. He follows the Irish from their first arrival in the American colonies through the bleak days of the potato famine that brought millions of starving immigrants; the trials of ethnic prejudice and "No Irish Need Apply;" the rise of Irish political power and the heyday of Tammany politics; to the election of John F. Kennedy as president, a moment of triumph when an Irish American ascended to the highest office in the land. Dolan evokes the ghastly ships crowded with men and women fleeing the potato blight; the vibrant life of Catholic parishes in cities like New York and Chicago; the world of machine politics, where ward bosses often held court in the local saloon. Rich in colorful detail, balanced in judgment, and the most comprehensive work of its kind yet published, THE AMERICAN IRISH is a lasting achievement by a master historian that will become a must-have volume for any American with an interest in the Irish-American heritage.


The Irish Americans

Author by : William D. Griffin
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Description : Presents the powerful story of the forty million Irish Americans, descendants of the seven million who emigrated from Ireland to America over the last three centuries, in a richly textured portrait complete with paintings and vintage photographs.


The New Irish Americans

Author by : Ray O'Hanlon
Languange : en
Publisher by : Roberts Rinehart Publishers
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 56
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Description : Beginning in the early 1980s, tens of thousands of Irish nationals began settling in the U.S. Mostly young and mostly illegal, these new Irish soon began agitating for legal resident status--and making their mark on older Irish communities. Writing with wit and an eye for detail, O'Hanlon captures the travails and triumphs of these "new Irish" for the first time. 16 photos.


Irish In Michigan

Author by : Seamus P. Metress
Languange : en
Publisher by : MSU Press
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Total Read : 44
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Description : Irish immigration to the United States can be divided into five general periods, from 1640 to the present: the colonial, prestarvation, great starvation, post-starvation, and post- independence periods. Immigration to the Great Lakes region and, more specifically, to Michigan was differentially influenced during each of these times. The oppressive historical roots of the Irish in both Ireland and nineteenth century America are important to understand in gaining an appreciation for their concern with socioeconomic status. The Irish first entered the Great Lakes by way of the Ohio River and Appalachian passes, spreading north along the expanding frontier. After the War of 1812, the Irish were heavily represented in frontier military garrisons. Many Irish moved into the Detroit metropolitan area as well as to farming areas throughout Michigan. In the 1840s, a number of Irish began fishing in the waters off Beaver Island, Mackinac Island, Bay City, Saginaw, and Alpena. From 1853 to 1854, Irish emigrants from the Great Starvation dug the Ste. Marie Canal while others dug canals in Grand Rapids and Saginaw. Irish nationalism in both Michigan and the United States has been closely linked with the labor movement in which Irish Americans were among the earliest organizers and leaders. Irish American nationalism forced the Irish regardless of their local Irish origins to assume a larger Irish identity. Irish Americans have a long history of involvement in the struggle for Irish Freedom dating from the 1840s. As Patrick Ford, editor of Irish World has said, America led the Irish from the "littleness of countyism into a broad feeling of nationalism."


The Irish Voice In America

Author by : Charles Fanning
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Description : In this study, Charles Fanning has written the first general account of the origins and development of a literary tradition among American writers of Irish birth or background who have explored the Irish immigrant or ethnic experience in works of fiction. The result is a portrait of the evolving fictional self-consciousness of an immigrant group over a span of 250 years. Fanning traces the roots of Irish-American writing back to the eighteenth century and carries it forward through the traumatic years of the Famine to the present time with an intensely productive period in the twentieth century beginning with James T. Farrell. Later writers treated in depth include Edwin O'Connor, Elizabeth Cullinan, Maureen Howard, and William Kennedy. Along the way he places in the historical record many all but forgotten writers, including the prolific Mary Ann Sadlier. The Irish Voice in America is not only a highly readable contribution to American literary history but also a valuable reference to many writers and their works. For this second edition, Fanning has added a chapter that covers the fiction of the past decade. He argues that contemporary writers continue to draw on Ireland as a source and are important chroniclers of the modern American experience.


The Irish Americans

Author by : Karen Price Hossell
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Description : Reviews the reasons why millions of Irish have immigrated to America, what their passage was like, the kind of jobs most found, communities they formed, and the discrimination they faced.


Historical Archaeology Of The Irish Diaspora

Author by : Stephen A. Brighton
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ. of Tennessee Press
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Description : Anthropologist Brighton (Maryland) offers a historical archaeological investigation of the diaspora of Ireland, reflecting the migration of Irish immigrants to the US during a turbulent period in Irish history from the mid-1840s to the 1850s. Brighton's work is the first to offer a study through an archaeological lens connecting Irish communities spanning two continents and covering four sites: two in Ireland, specifically, in County Roscommon, and two in the US, the Five Points section of Manhattan, New York, as well as the historically Irish community in Paterson, New Jersey. There have been some recent diasporic studies on Irish migrations of the 19th century, such as Catherine Nash's Of Irish Descent: Origin Stories, Genealogy, and the Politics of Belonging (2008). However, Brighton's technique is inspired from transnational investigations of the African diaspora to the Atlantic world. This volume can serve as an excellent research tool for students of Ireland as well as diasporic archaeology. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All students of archaeology of the modern world." --B. C. Ryan, Syracuse University, Choice Between 1845 and 1852, a watershed event in Ireland's history--the Great Hunger--forced more than one million starved and dispossessed people, most of them poor tenant farmers, to leave their native country for the shores of the United States. Further weakened by the arduous voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, many sought refuge in the harbor cities in which they landed. Not surprisingly, Irish immigrants counted as one quarter of New York City's population during the 1850s. In Historical Archaeology of the Irish Diaspora, Stephen A. Brighton places Irish and Irish American material culture within a broad historical context, including the waves of immigration that preceded the Famine and the development of the Irish American communities that followed it. He meticulously details the archaeological research connected with excavations at two pre-Famine sites in County Roscommon, Ireland, and with several immigrant tenements located in the Five Points, Manhattan, and the Dublin section of nearby Paterson, New Jersey. Using this transnational approach to link artifacts and ceramics found in rural Ireland with those discovered in sites in the urban, northeastern United States, Brighton also employs contemporary diaspora studies to illustrate how various factions sustained a distinct homeland connection even as the Irish were first alienated from, and then gradually incorporated into, American society. With more than forty million Americans claiming Irish ancestry, fully understanding Ireland's traumatic history and its impact on the growth of the United States remains a vital task for researchers on both sides of the Atlantic. Brighton's study of lived experience follows a fascinating historical path that will aid scholars in a variety of disciplines. Stephen A. Brighton is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Maryland. His articles have appeared in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology and Historical Archaeology.


The Irish Americans

Author by : John Watney
Languange : en
Publisher by : Pitkin Unichrome, Limited
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How The Irish Became Americans

Author by : Joseph P. O'Grady
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Total Read : 45
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Irish Immigrants In New York City 1945 1995

Author by : Linda Dowling Almeida
Languange : en
Publisher by : Indiana University Press
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Total Read : 58
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Description : Irish Immigrants in New York City, 1945-1995 Linda Dowling Almeida The story of one of the most visible groups of immigrants in the major city of immigrants in the last half of the 20th century. "Almeida offers a dynamic portrait of Irish New York, one that keeps reinventing itself under new circumstances." —Hasia Diner, New York University "[Almeida's] close attention to changes in economics, culture, and politics on both sides of the Atlantic makes [this book] one of the more accomplished applications of the 'new social history' to a contemporary American ethnic group." —Roger Daniels, University of Cincinnati It is estimated that one in three New York City residents is an immigrant. No other American city has a population composed of so many different nationalities. Of these "foreign born," a relatively small percentage come directly from Ireland, but the Irish presence in the city—and America—is ubiquitous. In the 1990 census, Irish ancestry was claimed by over half a million New Yorkers and by 44 million nationwide. The Irish presence in popular American culture has also been highly visible. Yet for all the attention given to Irish Americans, surprisingly little has been said about post–World War II immigrants. Almeida's research takes important steps toward understanding modern Irish immigration. Comparing 1950s Irish immigrants with the "New Irish" of the 1980s, Almeida provides insights into the evolution of the Irish American identity and addresses the role of the United States and Ireland in shaping it. She finds, among other things, that social and economic progress in Ireland has heightened expectations for Irish immigrants. But at the same time they face greater challenges in gaining legal residence, a situation that has led the New Irish to reject many organizations that long supported previous generations of Irish immigrants in favor of new ones better-suited to their needs. Linda Dowling Almeida, Adjunct Professor of History at New York University, has published articles on the "New Irish" in America and is a longtime member of the New York Irish History Roundtable. She also edited Volume 8 of the journal New York Irish History. March 2001 232 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4, index, append. cloth 0-253-33843-3 $35.00 s / £26.5


The Irish American Heritage

Author by : David M. Brownstone
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Description : Explores the history, culture, and contributions of Irish-Americans from colonial times to the present day.


The Exiles Of Erin

Author by : Charles Fanning
Languange : en
Publisher by : Dufour Editions
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Total Read : 35
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Description : Of immense value to anyone interested in the Irish story in America.--The Boston Globe. This collection of three generations of Irish immigrant fiction excerpted from novels, magazines, and newspapers provides new insight into the nineteenth-century immigrant experience. It captures the spirit of those who were experiencing the traumas of adjustment and assimilation. The men and women authors of these pieces vividly render the details of immigrant life in a variety of settings, from Virginia and Nebraska to San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, and Boston, from 1820 to 1906. Fanning places each selection in its historical and cultural context by means of introductory notes. Together, they provide the most extended, continuous body of literature available to us by members of a single American ethnic group. This new edition provides some additional selections as well as new background material. Charles Fanning is Professor of English at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale


The Irish In New Jersey

Author by : Dermot Quinn
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rutgers University Press
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Description : Since Irish immigrants began settling in New Jersey during the seventeenth century, they have made a sizable impact on the state's history and development. As the budding colony established an identity in the New World, the Irish grappled with issues of their own: What did it mean to be Irish American, and what role would "Irishness" play in the creation of an American identity? In this richly illustrated history, Dermot Quinn uncovers the story of how the Irish in New Jersey maintained their cultural roots while also laying the foundations for the social, economic, political, and religious landscapes of their adopted country. Quinn chronicles the emigration of families from a conflict-torn and famine-stricken Ireland to the unfamiliar land whose unwelcoming streets often fell far short of being paved with gold. Using case histories from Paterson, Jersey City, and Newark, Quinn examines the transition of the Irish from a rejected minority to a middle-class, secular, and suburban identity. The Irish in New Jersey will appeal to everyone with an interest in the cultural heritage of a proud and accomplished people.


Visions Of The Irish Dream

Author by : Marguerite Quintelli-Neary
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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Total Read : 79
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Description : Visions of the Irish Dream assembles essays that examine the elusive dream of the Irish and Irish Americans, looking at aspirations of 19th-century emigrants to Canada and the United States, political and educational goals of the Irish, historic trauma, contemporary xenophobia, and artists’ renditions of “Irishness.” Whether the dreams are fulfilled or deferred, they all strive to come to terms with what it means to be Irish; sometimes the definition involves bringing a piece of the old country with you, buying facsimiles of “genuine Irish goods,” or redefining self in a way that frees Ireland of the colonial model. This study explores the conflicted and shifting visions of the people who inhabit or have left an isolated island that has moved from a search for independence to integration into a European union. From discussion of the politics of translation in Ferguson and Mangan to the establishment of the National schools, the movement of the Celts from continental Europe as evidenced in Joyce to the translatlantic flight of the Irish to the Americas in a drama by Nicola McCartney, and the re-invention of the feminine force in the writings of novelists Jennifer Johnston and Roddy Doyle to the feminine voice expressed in the work of poet Eiléan NíChuilleanáin, the collection underscores the significance of the dream in Irish history and the arts.


The Irish Relations

Author by : Dennis Clark
Languange : en
Publisher by : Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
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Description : An extensively documented collection of essays examining various aspects of Irish-American life in Philadelphia over a major portion of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


Paddy Whacked

Author by : T. J. English
Languange : en
Publisher by : Harper Collins
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Description : Here is the shocking true saga of the Irish American mob. In Paddy Whacked, bestselling author and organized crime expert T. J. English brings to life nearly two centuries of Irish American gangsterism, which spawned such unforgettable characters as Mike "King Mike" McDonald, Chicago's subterranean godfather; Big Bill Dwyer, New York's most notorious rumrunner during Prohibition; Mickey Featherstone, troubled Vietnam vet turned Westies gang leader; and James "Whitey" Bulger, the ruthless and untouchable Southie legend. Stretching from the earliest New York and New Orleans street wars through decades of bootlegging scams, union strikes, gang wars, and FBI investigations, Paddy Whacked is a riveting tour de force that restores the Irish American gangster to his rightful preeminent place in our criminal history -- and penetrates to the heart of the American experience.


The Irish Americans

Author by : Jim F. Watts
Languange : en
Publisher by : Chelsea House Publications
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 66
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Description : Discusses the history, culture, and religion of the Irish, factors encouraging their emigration, and their acceptance as an ethnic group in North America.


I Am Irish American

Author by : Ellwood Connor
Languange : en
Publisher by : Taylor & Francis US
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 93
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Description : Discusses an Irish American's heritage, including famous Irish Americans and information about Ireland.


The Irish Patriot

Author by : Daniel O'Connell
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
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Total Read : 33
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Textures Of Irish America

Author by : Lawrence J. McCaffrey
Languange : en
Publisher by : Irish Studies
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Total Read : 26
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Description : Discusses how the Irish adapted to urban life in America, progressing from unskilled working class to solid middle class, and achieved both through politics and the Catholic Church, and looks at the role played by Irish nationalism


Politics Culture And The Irish American Press

Author by : Debra Reddin van Tuyll
Languange : en
Publisher by : Syracuse University Press
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Total Read : 82
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Description : From the Revolutionary War forward, Irish immigrants have contributed significantly to the construction of the American Republic. Scholars have documented their experiences and explored their social, political, and cultural lives in countless books. Offering a fresh perspective, this volume traces the rich history of the Irish American diaspora press, uncovering the ways in which a lively print culture forged significant cultural, political, and even economic bonds between the Irish living in America and the Irish living in Ireland. As the only mass medium prior to the advent of radio, newspapers served to foster a sense of identity and a means of acculturation for those seeking to establish themselves in the land of opportunity. Irish American newspapers provided information about what was happening back home in Ireland as well as news about the events that were occurring within the local migrant community. They framed national events through Irish American eyes and explained the significance of what was happening to newly arrived immigrants who were unfamiliar with American history or culture. They also played a central role in the social life of Irish migrants and provided the comfort that came from knowing that, though they may have been far from home, they were not alone. Taking a long view through the prism of individual newspapers, editors, and journalists, the authors in this volume examine the emergence of the Irish American diaspora press and its profound contribution to the lives of Irish Americans over the course of the last two centuries.


The Irish Patriot

Author by : O'Connell O'Connell
Languange : en
Publisher by : Forgotten Books
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Description : Excerpt from The Irish Patriot: Daniel O'connel's Legacy to Irish Americans With the abolitionists, and never to cease your efforts until perfect liberty be granted to every one of her inhabitants, the black man as well as the white man. We are all children of the same gracious God; all equally entitled to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


Irish Stereotypes In Vaudeville 1865 1905

Author by : Jennifer Mooney
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
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Description : Vaudeville is often viewed as the source of some of the crude stereotypes that positioned the Irish immigrant in America as the antithesis of native-born American citizens. Using primary archival material, Mooney argues that the vaudeville stage was an important venue in which an Irish-American identity was constructed, negotiated, and refined.


The Shamrock And The Cross

Author by : Eileen P. Sullivan
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Notre Dame Pess
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Total Read : 36
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Description : In The Shamrock and the Cross: Irish American Novelists Shape American Catholicism, Eileen P. Sullivan traces changes in nineteenth-century American Catholic culture through a study of Catholic popular literature. Analyzing more than thirty novels spanning the period from the 1830s to the 1870s, Sullivan elucidates the ways in which Irish immigration, which transformed the American Catholic population and its institutions, also changed what it meant to be a Catholic in America. In the 1830s and 1840s, most Catholic fiction was written by American-born converts from Protestant denominations; after 1850, most was written by Irish immigrants or their children, who created characters and plots that mirrored immigrants’ lives. The post-1850 novelists portrayed Catholics as a community of people bound together by shared ethnicity, ritual, and loyalty to their priests rather than by shared theological or moral beliefs. Their novels focused on poor and working-class characters; the reasons they left their homeland; how they fared in the American job market; and where they stood on issues such as slavery, abolition, and women’s rights. In developing their plots, these later novelists took positions on capitalism and on race and gender, providing the first alternative to the reigning domestic ideal of women. Far more conscious of American anti-Catholicism than the earlier Catholic novelists, they stressed the dangers of assimilation and the importance of separate institutions supporting a separate culture. Given the influence of the Irish in church institutions, the type of Catholicism they favored became the gold standard for all American Catholics, shaping their consciousness until well into the next century.


Waterbury Irish

Author by : Janet Maher
Languange : en
Publisher by : Arcadia Publishing
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Description : The hard work of nineteenth-century Irish immigrants in Waterbury helped place the city on the map as the Brass Capital of the World. In the early years of immigration, Irish Catholics held Mass in secret, but eventually beautiful churches were built, attracting the most revered clergy in Connecticut. Soon Irish and Irish Americans established themselves as city leaders and professionals in the community. Dr. Charles A. Monagan was a founding member of St. Mary’s Hospital, while his son John later became mayor. Some achieved fame through their excellence in sports, such as Roger Connor, who held a long-standing record for career home runs until it was broken by Babe Ruth. Detailed research and oral histories from living descendants bring to light the remarkable Waterbury Irish legacy.


Irish Americans

Author by : Margaret Hall
Languange : en
Publisher by : Heinemann/Raintree
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Total Read : 13
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Description : Describes the conditions in Ireland that led people to immigrate to the United States and what their daily lives are like in their new home.


The Irish Way

Author by : James R. Barrett
Languange : en
Publisher by : Penguin Press HC
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 76
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Description : A lively history of turn-of-the-20th-century urban life in major cities as experienced and influenced by Irish Americans makes a case that urban culture was largely shaped by people with a distinctly Hibernian heritage, explaining that the descendants of Irish immigrants imposed their own values, beliefs and prejudices on subsequent newcomers. By the author of The Tragedy of American Radicalism. 30,000 first printing.


Making The Irish American

Author by : J.J. Lee
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
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Description : Explores the history of the Irish in America, offering an overview of Irish history, immigration to the United States, and the transition of the Irish from the working class to all levels of society.