Limits Of Doubt The

Author by : Petr Lom
Languange : en
Publisher by : SUNY Press
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Description : Shows how different forms of skepticism can lead to remarkably different moral and political implications.


Philosophy And The Limits Of Doubt

Author by : Arnold Edwin Johanson
Languange : en
Publisher by :
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Total Read : 66
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Faith Hope And Doubt In Times Of Uncertainty

Author by : George Ellis
Languange : en
Publisher by : ReadHowYouWant.com
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Total Read : 30
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Description : 'I propose there is a moral reality as well as a physical reality and a mathematical reality underlying the world and the universe, and that human moral life is a search to understand and implement that true nature of morality. I suggest to nature of that moral reality is centred in love, with the idea of kenosis (''letting go'') playing a key role in the human, moral and spiritual spheres because of its transformational qualities. This is only one of many intimations of transcendence available to us: these entail qualities in which much more than is necessary is present in the real world in which we live, an abundance leading to wonder and reverence as we realize and appreciate them. An integral view of existence takes these qualities into account. I suggest that true spirituality lies in seeing the integral whole, which includes science and all it discovers, but also includes deep views of ethics, aesthetics, and meaning, seeing them as based in and expressing the power of love. Science can be powerful in the service of this integral view, but must not attempt to supplant it.'


Doubt And Skepticism In Antiquity And The Renaissance

Author by : Michelle Zerba
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
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Total Read : 36
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Description : An interdisciplinary study of the forms and uses of uncertainty in important works of literature and philosophy in antiquity and the Renaissance.


Zeno And The Tortoise

Author by : Nicholas Fearn
Languange : en
Publisher by : Atlantic Monthly Press
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Total Read : 16
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Description : For those who don't know the difference between Protagoras's pigs and Bacon's chickens, Zeno and the Tortoise is a sharp and witty guide to the biggest ideas in philosophy and how to use them. Thinking rationally involves using the right philosophical tool at the right time, be it Hume's Fork, Nietzsche's hammer, or some other device from the thinker's toolbox.


Doubt And Religious Commitment

Author by : M. Jamie Ferreira
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
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Total Read : 79
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Doubt Time Violence

Author by : Piotr Hoffman
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
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Total Read : 68
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Description : In this work of original philosophy, Piotr Hoffman focuses on two of the central concerns of modern philosophy—doubt and time. He argues that both concerns stem from a suppressed but underlying feeling that life is an all-out, unrestrained struggle and that violence is inherent in the human condition. According to Hoffman, modern philosophy becomes fully intelligible and coherent only when the notion of human violence is given paramount importance. After briefly pointing out some significant parallels between Hobbes and Descartes, Hoffman undertakes a careful examination of ideas about doubt and time in the works of Descartes and Hegel, and, above all, in Heidegger's Being and Time. In a chapter on doubt, Hoffman shows that the skeptical predicament into which man is placed by Descartes's "evil demon" and Heidegger's "death" is grounded in the notion of complete vulnerability to an "other," a vulnerability revealed only in violent confrontation. Hoffman then compares Hegel's and Heidegger's views on time, showing that they presuppose the possibility of viewing the present as a complete break with the past. This possibility is again grounded in the experience of violent struggle with another human being. Hoffman concludes by linking philosophical concepts of doubt and time to ordinary experience. A lucid, intelligent, and persuasive work, firmly grounded in the texts it considers, Doubt, Time, Violence will challenge philosophers and interest all who ponder the significance of violence.


The Museum Of Doubt

Author by : James Meek
Languange : en
Publisher by : Canongate Books
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Total Read : 49
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Description : “Outstanding” stories from the bestselling author—“as though David Lynch had been let loose on the set of a drawing-room comedy” (The Times). The Museum of Doubt is a collection of surreal and unnerving short stories from award-winning writer James Meek. The array of characters who populate Meek’s vague and elusive worlds are driven by paranoia and doubts, as well as hopes and fears of things only half-glimpsed. “Ricochets between the supernatural and the suburban throughout . . . the writing fizzes . . . This is true experimental writing: careless of taboo, teeming with ideas, elusive yet utterly controlled.” —The Guardian “The maniac energy of Kerouac pulses throughout the prose, but there is also a hallucinatory horror and hyper-realist constraint miraculously balanced in a manner which suggests the perfect fusion of Kafka and Kelman.” —Scotsman “Demanding and rewarding, lyrical and vernacular, smart and entertaining.” —Times Literary Supplement “Bristling with wit and invention, these tales are full of hair-brained schemes, hair-raising moments, and incredibly close shaves . . . tongue-twisting wordplay, clipped dialogue and well-groomed characters . . . These stories are all collector’s items.” —The Sunday Herald “Stories of antler eaters, fish smokers and suburban psychopaths make up this often startling and always disturbing collection.” —Duncan McLean, author of Bunker Man “One of the country’s finest writers.” —GQ


Philosophy In Classical India

Author by : Jonardon Ganeri
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Total Read : 46
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Description : This original work focuses on the rational principles of Indian philosophical theory, rather than the mysticism more usually associated with it. Ganeri explores the philosophical projects of a number of major Indian philosophers and looks into the methods of rational inquiry deployed within these projects. In so doing, he illuminates a network of mutual reference, criticism, influence and response, in which reason is used to call itself into question. This fresh perspective on classical Indian thought unravels new philosophical paradigms, and points towards new applications for the concept of reason.


Spinoza And Dutch Cartesianism

Author by : Alexander X. Douglas
Languange : en
Publisher by : OUP Oxford
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Total Read : 56
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Description : Alexander X. Douglas offers a new understanding of Spinoza's philosophy by situating it in its immediate historical context. He defends a thesis about Spinoza's philosophical motivations and then bases an interpretation of his major works upon it. The thesis is that much of Spinoza's philosophy was conceived with the express purpose of rebutting a claim about the limitations of philosophy made by some of his contemporaries. They held that philosophy is intrinsically incapable of revealing anything of any relevance to theology, or in fact to any study of direct practical relevance to human life. Spinoza did not. He believed that philosophy reveals the true nature of God, and that God is nothing like what the majority of theologians, or indeed of religious believers in general, think he is. The practical implications of this change in the concept of God were profound and radical. As Douglas shows, many of Spinoza's theories were directed towards showing how the separation his opponents endeavoured to maintain between philosophical and non-philosophical (particularly theological) thought was logically untenable.