The Mexican Experience In Chicago

Author by : Marc Zimmerman
Languange : en
Publisher by : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 71
Total Download : 995
File Size : 53,7 Mb
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Description : Chicagoland's Latino population developed in relation to labor needs in the steel mills, railroad lines and packing houses. First, the Mexican population grew slowly serving as a buffer against African American and striking workers. Many were deported during the Depression; but in spite of continuing deportations, the population grew, as Mexicans and Puerto Ricans arrived in great numbers after World War II. With the 60s, Cubans joined the wave, so that by the 1970s, the city had become a key Latino population center. With large-scale Mexican and Central American immigration in the 1980s, Chicago experienced a Latino population explosion, leading to intensified ethnic and transnational identifications as well as growing political struggle. Indeed, the evolving situation of Chicago Latinos and Mexicans highlights matters crucial to their own future and the future of the city and the nation itself. This book plots the history of Mexican Chicago and the development of Chicago Mexican and Latino studies. Essays about Chicago Latinos and Mexicans set the stage for a telling interview of Luis Leal, an iconic pioneer of Mexican and Chicano literature, and longtime Chicago resident, evoking the city's Mexican life. Next comes a compilation of comments made by and about early Chicago Mexicans as found in the first studies of this population. A final essay shows how the study of Chicago Mexicans from Guanajuato, can offer new insights affecting our overall view of Chicago's Mexican population. Taken together, these materials, sum up and enrich past work, but also anticipate, corroborate and at times challenge research that has been developing in recent years. The materials are a valuable contribution to the new wave of Chicago Latino and Mexican studies. Editor Marc Zimmerman is Emeritus Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at the U. of Illinois at Chicago and of World and Hispanic Cultures and Literature, at the U. of Houston. His many books and edited volumes feature several on U.S. and Chicago Latino themes, including studies of Latino transnational processes, Latinos in U.S. cities, U.S. Latino literature, U.S. Puerto Rican culture, and several studies about Chicago Latino artists and writers. His growing body of fiction includes Martín and Marvin: A Chicago Jewish Mexican and their Latin Worlds (2016).


Mexican Chicago

Author by : Gabriela F. Arredondo
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Illinois Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 28
Total Download : 197
File Size : 47,5 Mb
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Description : Becoming Mexican in early-twentieth-century Chicago


The Rough Guide To Chicago

Author by : Rough Guides
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rough Guides UK
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 22
Total Download : 674
File Size : 49,9 Mb
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Description : The Rough Guide to Chicago is the ultimate travel guide with clear maps and detailed coverage of all the best attractions Chicago has to offer. Discover the pulsating metropolis of Chicago from the Gospel brunch at the House of Blues, a heavenly but fattening experience, to the Oak Street Beach, the glorious summertime playground in a somewhat unexpected location. Packed with detailed, practical advice on what to see and do in Chicago, this guide provides reliable, up-to-date descriptions of the best hotels in Chicago, Chicago's best bars and recommended restaurants, and tips on the best shopping and festivals in Chicago for all budgets. Featuring detailed coverage on a full range of attractions; from the Maxwell Street Market and Steppenwolf Theatre, to boat trips on the Chicago River and the Ravinia Festival, you'll find expert tips on exploring Chicago's amazing attractions with an authoritative background on Chicago's rich culture and history. Explore all corners of Chicago with the clearest maps of any guide. Make the most of your holiday with The Rough Guide to Chicago.


Mexican Chicago

Author by : Rita Arias Jirasek
Languange : en
Publisher by : Arcadia Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 46
Total Download : 526
File Size : 44,8 Mb
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Description : Photographs from family archives, museums, and university collections capture the cultural, economic, and religious history of Chicago's Mexican communities, providing images of such neighborhoods as Pilsen, Little Village, Back of the Yards, and South Deering.


City Of Dreams

Author by : Wilfredo Cruz
Languange : en
Publisher by : University Press of Amer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 35
Total Download : 627
File Size : 51,8 Mb
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Description : City of Dreams: Latino Immigration to Chicago uses extensive oral interviews combined with scholarly documentation to richly describe the social history of the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Guatemalan, Salvadoran, and Cuban groups in Chicago. Drawing on the stories of one hundred diverse Latinos, this work attempts to give the largest minority population in America a voice, showing how they view themselves and their immigration experiences. This book, while discussing the reasons for immigration, focuses on the adjustments and adaptations of each Latino group; their aspirations; obstacles; relations with other ethnic groups; and overall survival in a new and sometimes hostile American city.


Steel Barrio

Author by : Michael Innis-Jiménez
Languange : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 49
Total Download : 926
File Size : 40,6 Mb
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Description : "The richly documented history of Mexican South Chicago here yields a sophisticated, rounded, and compelling study of the evolution of an immigrant place. Attentive to structural factors shaping migration and assimilation, Innis-Jiménez also tells textured human stories of the work, play, and solidarity that created and recreated an enduring community, snatching life from discrimination and hardship." —David Roediger, University of Illinois Since the early twentieth century, thousands of Mexican Americans have lived, worked, and formed communities in Chicago’s steel mill neighborhoods. Drawing on individual stories and oral histories, Michael Innis-Jiménez tells the story of a vibrant, active community that continues to play a central role in American politics and society. Examining how the fortunes of Mexicans in South Chicago were linked to the environment they helped to build, Steel Barrio offers new insights into how and why Mexican Americans created community. This book investigates the years between the World Wars, the period that witnessed the first, massive influx of Mexicans into Chicago. South Chicago Mexicans lived in a neighborhood whose literal and figurative boundaries were defined by steel mills, which dominated economic life for Mexican immigrants. Yet while the mills provided jobs for Mexican men, they were neither the center of community life nor the source of collective identity. Steel Barrio argues that the Mexican immigrant and Mexican American men and women who came to South Chicago created physical and imagined community not only to defend against the ever-present social, political, and economic harassment and discrimination, but to grow in a foreign, polluted environment. Steel Barrio reconstructs the everyday strategies the working-class Mexican American community adopted to survive in areas from labor to sports to activism. This book links a particular community in South Chicago to broader issues in twentieth-century U.S. history, including race and labor, urban immigration, and the segregation of cities. Michael Innis-Jiménez is a native of Laredo, Texas and Assistant Professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of Alabama. He lives in Tuscaloosa where he working on his next book on Latino/a immigration to the American South. In the Culture, Labor, History series


Chicanas Of 18th Street

Author by : Leonard G. Ramírez
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Illinois Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 46
Total Download : 130
File Size : 43,6 Mb
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Description : Overflowing with powerful testimonies of six female community activists who have lived and worked in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago, Chicanas of 18th Street reveals the convictions and approaches of those organizing for social reform. In chronicling a pivotal moment in the history of community activism in Chicago, the women discuss how education, immigration, religion, identity, and acculturation affected the Chicano movement. Chicanas of 18th Street underscores the hierarchies of race, gender, and class while stressing the interplay of individual and collective values in the development of community reform. Highlighting the women's motivations, initiatives, and experiences in politics during the 1960s and 1970s, these rich personal accounts reveal the complexity of the Chicano movement, conflicts within the movement, and the importance of teatro and cultural expressions to the movement. Also detailed are vital interactions between members of the Chicano movement with leftist and nationalist community members and the influence of other activist groups such as African Americans and Marxists.


Proletarians Of The North

Author by : Zaragosa Vargas
Languange : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 65
Total Download : 916
File Size : 47,7 Mb
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Description : Between the end of World War I and the Great Depression, over 58,000 Mexicans journeyed to the Midwest in search of employment. Many found work in agriculture, but thousands more joined the growing ranks of the industrial proletariat. Relating the experiences of Mexicans in the workplace and neighborhood, and showing the roles of Mexican women, the Catholic Church, and labor unions, Vargas enriches our knowledge of immigrant urban life.--Publisher's description.


Border Crossings

Author by : John Mason Hart
Languange : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 92
Total Download : 649
File Size : 40,9 Mb
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Description : The history of Mexican and Mexican-American working classes has been segregated by the political boundary that separates the United States of America from the United States of Mexico. As a result, scholars have long ignored the social, cultural, and political threads that the two groups hold in common. Further, they have seldom addressed the impact of American values and organizations on the working class of that country. Compiled by one of the leading North American experts on the Mexican Revolution, the essays in Border Crossings: Mexican and Mexican-American Workers explore the historical process behind the formation of the Mexican and Mexican- American working classes. The volume connects the history of their experiences from the cultural beginnings and the rise of industrialism in Mexico to the late twentieth century in the U.S. Border Crossings notes the similar social experiences and strategies of Mexican workers in both countries, community formation and community organizations, their mutual aid efforts, the movements of people between Mexico and Mexican-American communities, the roles of women, and the formation of political groups. Finally, Border Crossings addresses the special conditions of Mexicans in the United States, including the creation of a Mexican-American middle class, the impact of American racism on Mexican communities, and the nature and evolution of border towns and the borderlands.


Brown In The Windy City

Author by : Lilia Fernández
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 59
Total Download : 696
File Size : 46,9 Mb
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Description : Brown in the Windy City is the first history to examine the migration and settlement of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans in postwar Chicago. Lilia Fernández reveals how the two populations arrived in Chicago in the midst of tremendous social and economic change and, in spite of declining industrial employment and massive urban renewal projects, managed to carve out a geographic and racial place in one of America’s great cities. Through their experiences in the city’s central neighborhoods over the course of these three decades, Fernández demonstrates how Mexicans and Puerto Ricans collectively articulated a distinct racial position in Chicago, one that was flexible and fluid, neither black nor white.