The Native American In Long Fiction

Author by : Joan Beam
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 21
Total Download : 609
File Size : 45,9 Mb
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Description : A companion guide to the authors' 1996 work, The Native American in Long Fiction: An Annotated Bibliography, this supplement is a compilation of all identifiable novel-length fictional works by and about Native Americans published primarily between the years 1995 and 2002. Recently more Native Americans are writing their own stories and telling their contemporary experiences, and the novels included in this supplement reflect that shift. It identifies Native American authors who have written long fiction on themes relevant to their history, social conditions, culture, and people, and includes all works by non-Native American authors that either have Native Americans as central characters or Native American issues as central themes. Though it concentrates on fictional works published about native people in the United States and Alaska, it also includes many works that focus on tribes from other areas of North America, such as Canada, and includes all literary genres: mysteries, historical fiction, westerns, romances, and contemporary fiction. This is an imperative addition to the field that raises the awareness of Native American issues in either an historical context, a cultural or social context, or in contemporary society. For use by librarians and library collection development staff, teachers, educators and faculty in high schools and colleges, and by the general public eager to locate and identify novels on Native American themes. Includes short critical annotations, indexes by tribal affiliation, geographical location, time period, historical persons and events, a list of works not included, and a Best Books list of the authors' personal favorites.


The Native American In Long Fiction

Author by : Joan Beam
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 293
File Size : 49,8 Mb
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Description : Lists fiction by and about Native Americans, with synopsis, time period, location, and tribe


Mediation In Contemporary Native American Fiction

Author by : James Ruppert
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Oklahoma Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 94
Total Download : 894
File Size : 50,8 Mb
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Description : Mediation is the term James Ruppert uses to describe his important new theory of reading Native American fiction. Focusing on novels of six major contemporary American writers - N. Scott Momaday, James Welch, Leslie Silko, Gerald Vizenor, D'Arcy McNickle, and Louise Erdrich - Ruppert analyzes the ways in which these writers draw upon their bicultural heritage, guiding Native and non-Native readers alike to a different and expanded understanding of each other's worlds. While Native American writers may criticize white society, revealing its past and present injustices, their emphasis, Ruppert argues, is on healing, survival, and continuance. Their fiction aims to produce cross-cultural understanding rather than divisiveness. To that end they articulate the perspectives and values of competing world views. In particular they create characters who manifest what Ruppert calls "multiple identities" - determined by both Native and non-Native perceptions of the self. These writers use a variety of narrative techniques deriving from different cultural traditions. They might incorporate Native oral storytelling techniques, adapting them to written form, or they might reconstruct Native mythologies, investing them with new meaning and relevance by applying them to contemporary situations. As novel-writers, they also include features more characteristic of western European writing - such as the omniscient narrator or the detective-story plot.


Reckonings

Author by : Hertha D. Sweet Wong
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 44
Total Download : 229
File Size : 50,8 Mb
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Description : Unlike most anthologies that present a single story from many writers, this volume offers an in-depth sampling of two or three stories by a select number of both famous and emergent Native women writers. Here you will find much-loved stories (many made easily accessible for the first time) and vibrant new stories by such well-known contemporary Native American writers as Paula Gunn Allen, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, Linda Hogan, and Leslie Marmon Silko as well as the fresh voices of emergent writers such as Reid Gomez and Beth Piatote. These stories celebrate Native American life and provide readers with essential insight into this vibrant culture.


Shape Shifting

Author by : Andrew Macdonald
Languange : en
Publisher by : Praeger Pub Text
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 58
Total Download : 613
File Size : 51,5 Mb
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Description : A study of western, romance, detective, horror, and science fiction genres that highlights the range of Native American images in modern popular fiction and the numerous agendas these images serve.


Native American Mystery Writing

Author by : Mary Stoecklein
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lexington Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 70
Total Download : 890
File Size : 46,8 Mb
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Description : Native American Mystery Writing: Indigenous Investigations examines Native-authored mystery novels as a way to consider how Native American writers use a popular and accessible literary genre to make social, cultural, and political critiques. Though mystery/crime/detective fiction is one of the most popular forms of fiction in the world, little scholarship currently exists regarding Native American writers and how they add new dimensions to the widely read genre. Rather, the majority of scholarship examines the depiction of Native characters from the perspective of non-Native authors. This book analyzes how Native authors use the genre to foreground centuries of settler-colonial crimes and comment upon the ways in which these crimes continue to impact Native individuals and communities today. Considering fourteen novels and two made-for-TV films, this book analyzes a spectrum of settler-colonial crimes: the Osage oil murders, sexual assault against Native women, missing/murdered Indigenous women, the California mission system, spiritual beliefs and freedom of religion, conceptions of healing, theft—of land, children, and cultural items—and, of course, murder. Examination of these texts shows how Native authors working with the mystery/crime/detective fiction format are able to entertain readers while also shedding light on settler-colonial crimes, arguing for strengthened tribal sovereignty, and illustrating the resilience of Indigenous peoples—all in order to promote discussions about creating a more just system for Native Nations.


Native American Fiction

Author by : David Treuer
Languange : en
Publisher by : Graywolf Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 27
Total Download : 803
File Size : 40,8 Mb
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Description : An entirely new approach to reading, understanding, and enjoying Native American fiction This book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about at all, it is worth thinking about as literature. The vast majority of thought that has been poured out onto Native American literature has puddled, for the most part, on how the texts are positioned in relation to history or culture. Rather than create a comprehensive cultural and historical genealogy for Native American literature, David Treuer investigates a selection of the most important Native American novels and, with a novelist's eye and a critic's mind, examines the intricate process of understanding literature on its own terms. Native American Fiction: A User's Manual is speculative, witty, engaging, and written for the inquisitive reader. These essays—on Sherman Alexie, Forrest Carter, James Fenimore Cooper, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch—are rallying cries for the need to read literature as literature and, ultimately, reassert the importance and primacy of the word.


Handbook Of Native American Literature

Author by : Andrew Wiget
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 47
Total Download : 156
File Size : 46,9 Mb
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Description : The Handbook of Native American Literature is a unique, comprehensive, and authoritative guide to the oral and written literatures of Native Americans. It lays the perfect foundation for understanding the works of Native American writers. Divided into three major sections, Native American Oral Literatures, The Historical Emergence of Native American Writing, and A Native American Renaissance: 1967 to the Present, it includes 22 lengthy essays, written by scholars of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. The book features reports on the oral traditions of various tribes and topics such as the relation of the Bible, dreams, oratory, humor, autobiography, and federal land policies to Native American literature. Eight additional essays cover teaching Native American literature, new fiction, new theater, and other important topics, and there are bio-critical essays on more than 40 writers ranging from William Apes (who in the early 19th century denounced white society's treatment of his people) to contemporary poet Ray Young Bear. Packed with information that was once scattered and scarce, the Handbook of Native American Literature -a valuable one-volume resource-is sure to appeal to everyone interested in Native American history, culture, and literature. Previously published in cloth as The Dictionary of Native American Literature


Native American Fiction

Author by : Grey Eagle Thornton
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lulu.com
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 95
Total Download : 809
File Size : 40,6 Mb
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Description : A collection of original Native American short stories.


Reckonings

Author by : Hertha Dawn Wong
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press, USA
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 12
Total Download : 896
File Size : 50,6 Mb
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Description : Unlike most anthologies that present a single story from many writers, this volume offers an in-depth sampling of two or three stories by a select number of both famous and emergent Native women writers. Here you will find much-loved stories (many made easily accessible for the first time)and vibrant new stories by such well-known contemporary Native American writers as Paula Gunn Allen, Louise Erdrich, Joy Harjo, Linda Hogan, and Leslie Marmon Silko as well as the fresh voices of emergent writers such as Reid Gomez and Beth Piatote. Although diverse in style, language, and tone, all of these stories are reckonings with the brutal history of colonization and its ongoing consequences: they reveal Native epistemologies; testify to historic wrongs; and insist upon an accounting. A reckoning requires diving inward and resurfacingwith new insights. These stories share an understanding of Native women's lives in their various modes of loss and struggle, resistance and acceptance, and rage and compassion, ultimately highlighting the individual and collective will to endure. These contemporary stories reflect cycles--mythiccycles, life cycles, cycles of resistance, and healing cycles--that insure Native survival. These are the stories told and retold by Native women who refuse to be silenced. Their collection celebrates survival and provides readers with an essential new resource.