Timing And Turnout

Author by : Sarah F. Anzia
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 18
Total Download : 528
File Size : 55,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Public policy in the United States is the product of decisions made by more than 500,000 elected officials, and the vast majority of those officials are elected on days other than Election Day. And because far fewer voters turn out for off-cycle elections, that means the majority of officials in America are elected by a politically motivated minority of Americans. Sarah F. Anzia is the first to systemically address the effects of election timing on political outcomes, and her findings are eye-opening. The low turnout for off-cycle elections, Anzia argues, increases the influence of organized interest groups like teachers’ unions and municipal workers. While such groups tend to vote at high rates regardless of when the election is held, the low turnout in off-cycle years enhances the effectiveness of their mobilization efforts and makes them a proportionately larger bloc. Throughout American history, the issue of election timing has been a contentious one. Anzia’s book traces efforts by interest groups and political parties to change the timing of elections to their advantage, resulting in the electoral structures we have today. Ultimately, what might seem at first glance to be mundane matters of scheduling are better understood as tactics designed to distribute political power, determining who has an advantage in the electoral process and who will control government at the municipal, county, and state levels.


The Primary Rules

Author by : Caitlin E. Jewitt
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 21
Total Download : 105
File Size : 45,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The primary rules that political parties set limit voter influence, but do not always work as parties expect


The New Chicago Way

Author by : Edgar H. Bachrach
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 84
Total Download : 238
File Size : 53,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : For all the wrong reasons, a national spotlight is shining on Chicago. The city has become known for its violence, police abuse, parent and teacher unrest, population decline, and mounting municipal and pension debt. The underlying problem, contend Ed Bachrach and Austin Berg, is that deliberative democracy is dead in the city. Chicago is home to the last strongman political system in urban America. The mayor holds all the power, and any perceived checks on mayoral control are often proven illusory. Rash decisions have resulted in poor outcomes. The outrageous consequences of unchecked power are evident in government failures in elections, schools, fiscal discipline, corruption, public support for private enterprise, policing, and more. Rather than simply lament the situation, criticize specific leaders, or justify an ideology, Bachrach and Berg compare the decisions about Chicago's governance and finances with choices made in fourteen other large U.S. cities. The problems that seem unique to Chicago have been encountered elsewhere, and Chicagoans, the authors posit, can learn from the successful solutions other cities have embraced. Chicago government and its citizens must let go of the past to prepare for the future, argue Bachrach and Berg. A future filled with demographic, technological, and economic change requires a government capable of responding and adapting. Reforms can transform the city. The prescriptions for change provided in this book point toward a hopeful future: the New Chicago Way.


Government Against Itself

Author by : Daniel DiSalvo
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 82
Total Download : 532
File Size : 40,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : As workers in the private sector struggle with stagnant wages, disappearing benefits, and rising retirement ages, unionized public employees retire in their fifties with over $100,000 a year in pension and healthcare benefits. The unions defend tooth and nail the generous compensation packages and extensive job security measures they've won for their members. However, the costs they impose crowd out important government services on which the poor and the middle class rely. Attempts to rein in the unions, as in Wisconsin and New Jersey, have met with massive resistance. Yet as Daniel DiSalvo argues in Government against Itself, public sector unions threaten the integrity of our very democracy. DiSalvo, a third generation union member, sees the value in private sector unions. But in public sector, unions do not face a genuine adversary at the bargaining table. Moreover, the public sector can't go out of business no matter how much union members manage to squeeze out of it. Union members have no incentive to settle for less, and the costs get passed along to the taxpayer. States and municipalities strain under the weight of their pension obligations, and the chasm between well-compensated public sector employees and their beleaguered private sector counterparts widens. Where private sector unions can provide a necessary counterweight to the power of capital, public employee unionism is basically the government bargaining with itself; it's no wonder they almost always win. The left is largely in thrall to the unions, both ideologically and financially; the right would simply take a hatchet to the state itself, eliminating important and valuable government services. Neither side offers a realistic vision of well-run government that spends tax dollars wisely and serves the public well. Moving beyond stale and unproductive partisan divisions, DiSalvo argues that we can build a better, more responsive government that is accountable to taxpayers. But we cannot do it until we challenge the dominance of public sector unions in government. This carefully reasoned analysis of the power of public sector unions is a vital contribution to the controversial debates about public versus private unions, increasing inequality, and the role of government in American life


Election Timing And The Political Influence Of The Organized

Author by : Sarah Frances Anzia
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 80
Total Download : 555
File Size : 51,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The vast majority of elected officials in the United States are elected on days other than national "Election Day." It is well documented that voter turnout in off-cycle elections is far lower than turnout in elections held concurrently with national elections. In this dissertation, I argue that the timing of elections affects not only how many people vote but also who votes, which candidates win, and how elected officials design public policy. I start in chapter 1 by summarizing the rules governing election timing in each of the 50 U.S. states. Then, in chapter 2, I present a theoretical framework for considering the causes and consequences of election timing. In the first part of the chapter, I argue that shifting from on-cycle to off-cycle election timing has the effect of increasing the electoral presence of organized interest groups. Because those who have a large stake in an election outcome turn out to vote at high rates regardless of when the election is held, and because low voter turnout enhances the effectiveness of interest groups' mobilization efforts, the members and mobilized supporters of organized interest groups make up a greater proportion of the active electorate in off-cycle elections than in on-cycle elections. In the second part of the chapter, I explain how the timing of elections shapes election outcomes and policymaking. I argue that organized interest groups that seek policies with concentrated benefits and distributed costs and that face relatively little organized competition should have greater success in securing the policies they favor when elections are held off-cycle rather than on-cycle. However, even when organized groups compete over policy, and even when voters on both sides of an issue are equally motivated to turn out, election timing can still tip the balance of power in favor of one group or its rival, with potential to change the outcomes of elections. In chapter 3, I test whether school boards that hold off-cycle elections make policy that is more responsive to the dominant interest group in school board elections -- teacher unions -- than school boards that hold elections concurrently with state and national elections. In a series of empirical tests, I find that school districts that hold off-cycle elections pay teachers significantly higher salaries than districts that hold on-cycle elections. In chapter 4, I apply this approach to municipal elections in California. I find that firefighters are better compensated in California cities that hold off-cycle elections, and I uncover some evidence that the same is true for police officers. Moreover, relative to cities that hold elections concurrently with state and national elections, cities with off-cycle elections spend more per capita on employee salaries, retirement costs, and health benefits. In chapter 5, I explore the histories of three large American cities, tracing what happened to their election schedules between the 1840s and the dawn of the Progressive Era. I find that prior to the Progressive municipal reform movement, the election timing of large cities changed frequently, and the decisions to change local election dates were politically contentious. The chapter also demonstrates that the timing of city elections has been an important determinant of voter turnout since before the Civil War. Chapters 6 and 7 investigate the politics of election timing choice in state legislatures in the 21st century. Using new data on electoral timing -- both public opinion data and data on the activity of state legislatures -- I find evidence that the politics of election timing choice today involves a struggle among groups for electoral influence.


Municipal Elections In California

Author by : Zoltan L Hajnal
Languange : en
Publisher by : Public Policy Instit. of CA
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 17
Total Download : 359
File Size : 52,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description :


Election Timing

Author by : Alastair Smith
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 42
Total Download : 523
File Size : 54,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The author explains when leaders call for elections and the consequences of their decisions.


Get Out The Vote

Author by : Donald P. Green
Languange : en
Publisher by : Brookings Institution Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 39
Total Download : 194
File Size : 46,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The most important element in every election is getting voters to the polls—these get-out-the-vote (GOTV) efforts make the difference between winning and losing office. With the first three editions of Get Out the Vote, Donald P. Green and Alan S. Gerber broke ground by introducing a new scientific approach to the challenge of voter mobilization and profoundly transformed how campaigns operate. Get Out the Vote has become the reference text for those who manage campaigns and study voter mobilization. In this expanded and updated edition, Green and Gerber incorporate data from a trove of recent studies that shed new light on the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of various campaign tactics, including door-to-door canvassing, e-mail, direct mail, and telephone calls. The new edition gives special attention to “relational organizing” through friend-to-friend communication and events. Available in time for the 2020 presidential campaign, this practical guide to voter mobilization will again be a must-read for consultants, candidates, and grassroots organizations.


Governing States And Localities

Author by : Kevin B. Smith
Languange : en
Publisher by : CQ Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 49
Total Download : 244
File Size : 42,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The partisan and ideological polarization associated with federal government plagues states and localities too, bringing with it significant implications for public policy and intergovernmental relations. The trusted and proven Governing States and Localities guides students through these issues and continues its focus on the role economic and budget pressures play. With their engaging journalistic writing and crisp storytelling, Kevin B. Smith and Alan Greenblatt employ a comparative approach to explain how and why states and localities are both similar and different in institutional structure, culture, history, economy, geography, and demographics. A great blend of high-quality academic analysis and the latest scholarship, the Sixth Edition is thoroughly updated to account for such major developments as state vs. federal conflicts over immigration reform, gun control, and voter rights; health and education reforms aimed at improving the effectiveness of state and local government service delivery; and the lingering effects of the Great Recession.


Voters Non Voters And The Implications Of Election Timing For Public Policy

Author by : Christopher R. Berry
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 54
Total Download : 232
File Size : 44,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This paper makes use of variation in the timing of local elections to shed light on one of the core questions in democratic politics: what would happen if everyone voted? Does a low voter turnout rate imply that a small subset of special interest voters controls politics and policy? Or, are voters largely representative of non-voters such that neither the outcomes of elections nor resulting public policies would change even if everyone participated? Rather than rely on surveys of nonvoters to extrapolate their hypothetical behavior, we rely on a natural experiment created by a 1980s change in the California Election Code, which allowed school districts to change their elections from off-cycle to on-cycle. Because we are able to observe very large within-district changes in voter turnout resulting from changes in election timing, we are able to isolate the effect of turnout on policy outcomes, including teacher salaries and student achievement tests. Our analysis demonstrates that changes in voter turnout do affect public policy, but modestly.


Veterinary Parasitology

Author by : M. A. Taylor
Languange : en
Publisher by : John Wiley & Sons
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 33
Total Download : 563
File Size : 50,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The recipient of much praise and acclaim, Veterinary Parasitology is widely considered to be the definitive veterinary parasitology reference for practitioners and students alike. This Fourth Edition has been developed and enhanced into a two-part reference to reflect recent advances in the field, modern teaching practice, and updated parasite taxonomic classification systems. Part One contains expanded individual parasite descriptions using current taxonomic status within three new chapters on Helminthology, Protozoology and Entomology. Further updated chapters are provided on: The laboratory diagnosis of parasitism, Antiparasitics, The epidemiology of parasitic diseases, and Host resistance to parasitic diseases. Host species chapters have been retained and expanded and are found in Part Two of the edition. KEY FEATURES Tailored for those directly involved in the diagnosis, treatment and control of parasitic diseases of domestic animals Compatible with the diversity of current parasitology teaching modules – both for teaching parasite systematics and diseases on a host-organ basis Offers the most detailed parasite descriptions available today for teachers, research groups, veterinarians in practice and in government service, and others involved in aspects of parasitic disease Thoroughly revised and restructured to reflect the most up-to-date advancements in the field, Veterinary Parasitology, Fourth Edition, enhances its stellar reputation as the gold standard reference text for the global veterinary profession.


Beyond Turnout

Author by : Shane P. Singh
Languange : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 26
Total Download : 401
File Size : 46,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Compulsory voting is widely used in the democratic world, and it is well established that it increases electoral participation. Beyond Turnout: How Compulsory Voting Shapes Citizens and Political Parties assesses the effects of compulsory voting beyond turnout. Singh first summarizes the normative arguments for and against compulsory voting, provides information on its contemporary use, reviews recent events pertaining to its (proposed) adoption and abolition, and provides an extensive account of extant research on its consequences. He then advances a theory that compulsory voting polarizes behavior and attitudes, and broadens gaps in political sophistication levels, among those with negative and positive orientations toward democracy. Recognizing the impact of mandatory voting on the electorate, political parties then alter the ways in which they seek votes, with mainstream parties moderating their platforms and smaller parties taking more extreme positions. Singh uses survey data from countries with compulsory voting to show that support for the requirement to vote is driven by individuals' orientations toward democracy. The theory is then comprehensively tested using: cross-national data; cross-cantonal data from Switzerland; and survey data from Argentina. Empirical results are largely indicative of the theorized process whereby compulsory voting has divergent effects on citizens and political parties. The book concludes with a discussion of future directions for academic research, implications for those who craft electoral policy, and alternative ways of boosting turnout. Comparative Politics is a series for researchers, teachers, and students of political science that deals with contemporary government and politics. Global in scope, books in the series are characterised by a stress on comparative analysis and strong methodological rigour. The series is published in association with the European Consortium for Political Research. For more information visit: www.ecprnet.eu. The series is edited by Susan Scarrow, Chair of the Department of Political Science, University of Houston, and Jonathan Slapin, Professor of Political Institutions and European Politics, Department of Political Science, University of Zurich.


Reforming The Presidential Nominating Process

Author by : Lisa K. Parshall
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 50
Total Download : 892
File Size : 55,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The 2020 presidential selection process is already underway. As the political parties finalize their nominating rules and the states jostle for an advantageous contest date, potential challengers are being identified and sized up by party insiders. Once again, media and popular attention will be disproportionately focused on the candidates’ performance in the first and earliest of the state nominating contests—and on how quickly the sequence of primaries and caucuses winnows the field and identifies the presumptive nominees. But what are the implications of a sequential and front-loaded nominating calendar that gives some voters outsized influence while leaving many others with a constrained choice—or no choice—in the selection of their party’s presidential nominee? Reforming the Presidential Nominating Process: Front-Loading's Consequences and the National Primary Solution critiques the contemporary nominating process from the perspective of voters and their right to effectively participate in their parties’ selection of a presidential nominee. Employing both a common-sense and legal, rights-based framework to invite a constitutionally grounded conversation on the legitimacy of the current presidential nominating process, Lisa K. Parshall argues that timing of participation in the nomination goes hand-in-hand with the right to choose a candidate and the fairest way to restore the promise of meaningful and timely participation for all voters is by adopting a same-day national primary. Viewed from the party membership perspective, this work illuminates the fundamental interests at stake that should be considered in any potential reform of the presidential nominating system.


Electoral Management Institutions And Practices In An Established Democracy

Author by : Fiona Buckley
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 78
Total Download : 398
File Size : 40,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Over the last three decades, electoral reform has moved centre stage in both new and established democracies. In Europe, the post 1989 democratisation wave brought important debates about electoral system choice and free and fair elections. But electoral reform also emerged on the agenda in a number of established democracies. Declining political participation, corruption scandals and party finance irregularities put the management of the democratic process on the political agenda. Election administration problems such as those in the Gore Bush election of 2000 thrust electoral integrity into the global political spotlight. In this edited collection, we are primarily concerned with the mechanics of how elections are run. Elections are complex administrative tasks and as International IDEA points out, they are also usually administered against a politically charged backdrop. This book brings together specialists to consider the election management process using diverse theoretical approaches and, addressing both emerging and perennial election debates such as the role of voter advice applications, election management bodies, districting, ballot design and media practices in the coverage of elections. The volume includes a number of comparative chapters which utilise data from large international datasets (VDem and CSES), several Irish case studies and an important Dutch study of voter advice applications with pioneering data. Collectively, the chapters provide insights into election administration in Ireland and many other established democracies. This book was previously published as a special issue of Irish Political Studies.


Classifying Elections In Britain

Author by : Christopher Kirkland
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer Nature
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 91
Total Download : 256
File Size : 53,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book seeks to understand and classify differences that exist between a variety of elections in Britain. It moves beyond first- and second-order classifications developed following the European Parliamentary Elections in 1979 to include elections of devolved administrations such as the Scottish Parliament, local mayors or the Police and Crime Commissioner Elections. Drawing upon a range of elections, the book develops a new classification based on the interactions that exist between voters, the media and political parties. In doing so, it argues that alongside voters, political parties and the media can, and do, prioritize certain elections. The author explores the role of each group within elections individually through case studies. The final chapter then offers an overall means of understanding the levels of salience attached to each election.


Gerrymandering In America

Author by : Anthony J. McGann
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 96
Total Download : 432
File Size : 48,9 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book considers the political and constitutional consequences of Vieth v. Jubelirer (2004), where the Supreme Court held that partisan gerrymandering challenges could no longer be adjudicated by the courts. Through a rigorous scientific analysis of US House district maps, the authors argue that partisan bias increased dramatically in the 2010 redistricting round after the Vieth decision, both at the national and state level. From a constitutional perspective, unrestrained partisan gerrymandering poses a critical threat to a central pillar of American democracy, popular sovereignty. State legislatures now effectively determine the political composition of the US House. The book answers the Court's challenge to find a new standard for gerrymandering that is both constitutionally grounded and legally manageable. It argues that the scientifically rigorous partisan symmetry measure is an appropriate legal standard for partisan gerrymandering, as it logically implies the constitutional right to individual equality and can be practically applied.


The Grassroots Of Democracy

Author by : Norman R. Luttbeg
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lexington Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 43
Total Download : 332
File Size : 44,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : American cities provide many of the governmental services that contribute to a greater quality of life for their inhabitants. Local governments are seen as those closest to the people and most responsive to them, more so than state and national governments. Yet typical turnout in municipal elections is below 30 percent of those eligible; few people want to be candidates for low-paying positions in city governments; and seldom are elections competitive--rarely do they offer voters a choice of policy positions among candidates. In The Grassroots of Democracy, Norman Luttbeg provides the results of a comparative study of two rounds of elections in the late 1980s and early 1990s in 118 randomly chosen cities whose populations exceed 25,000. Luttbeg seeks to account for why some cities had competitive elections while others did not; to assess the impact of competition on municipal policies, such as achieving growth or lowering taxes; and to examine the interaction between competition and accurate representation of minorities and women. Never before has a study comparatively assessed elections and policies in American cities in sufficient numbers that the idiosyncrasies of cities do not swamp the general patterns. The Grassroots of Democracy will thus hold significant interest for political scientists, sociologists, urban planners, and public administrators.


America S Uneven Democracy

Author by : Zoltan L. Hajnal
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 42
Total Download : 674
File Size : 42,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Although there is a widespread belief that uneven voter turnout leads to biased outcomes in American democracy, existing empirical tests have found few effects. By offering a systematic account of how and where turnout matters in local politics, this book challenges much of what we know about turnout in America today. It demonstrates that low and uneven turnout, a factor at play in most American cities, leads to sub-optimal outcomes for racial and ethnic minorities. Low turnout results in losses in mayoral elections, less equitable racial and ethnic representation on city councils, and skewed spending policies. The importance of turnout confirms long held suspicions about the under-representation of minorities and raises normative concerns about local democracy. Fortunately, this book offers a solution. Analysis of local participation indicates that a small change to local election timing - a reform that is cost effective and relatively easy to enact - could dramatically expand local voter turnout.


The Segmentation Of Europe

Author by : Mark Baimbridge
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 15
Total Download : 189
File Size : 49,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This book explores economic developments across Europe in relation to its apparent segmentation, as disparities widen between core and periphery countries. In contrast to previous literature, the scope of analysis is extended to Europe as a continent rather than confining it solely to the European Union, thereby providing the reader with greater insight into the core/periphery nexus. The authors commence with a critical appraisal of economic thinking in relation to regional trade agreements and monetary integration. In relation to a number of EU economies, the book addresses issues of a liquidity trap, deflation, and twin deficits, together with the interconnection between exchange rates and current account balances. Importantly, they extend the discussion of segmentation through a series of focused case studies on Russia, Brexit and emergence of the mega-regionals.


How The States Shaped The Nation

Author by : Melanie Jean Springer
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Chicago Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 62
Total Download : 235
File Size : 51,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : The United States routinely has one of the lowest voter turnout rates of any developed democracy in the world. That rate is also among the most internally diverse, since the federal structure allows state-level variations in voting institutions that have had—and continue to have—sizable local effects. But are expansive institutional efforts like mail-in registration, longer poll hours, and “no-excuse” absentee voting uniformly effective in improving voter turnout across states? With How the States Shaped the Nation, Melanie Jean Springer places contemporary reforms in historical context and systematically explores how state electoral institutions have been instrumental in shaping voting behavior throughout the twentieth century. Although reformers often assume that more convenient voting procedures will produce equivalent effects wherever they are implemented, Springer reveals that this is not the case. In fact, convenience-voting methods have had almost no effect in the southern states where turnout rates are lowest. In contrast, the adverse effects associated with restrictive institutions like poll taxes and literacy tests have been persistent and dramatic. Ultimately, Springer argues, no single institutional fix will uniformly resolve problems of low or unequal participation. If we want to reliably increase national voter turnout rates, we must explore how states’ voting histories differ and better understand the role of political and geographical context in shaping institutional effects.


British Elections And Parties Yearbook

Author by : David Broughton
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 21
Total Download : 524
File Size : 43,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : This volume looks at the political events and discusses the major issues of 1994, most notably the European parliament elections.


Hometown Inequality

Author by : Brian F. Schaffner
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 74
Total Download : 665
File Size : 46,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Local governments play a central role in American democracy, providing essential services such as policing, water, and sanitation. Moreover, Americans express great confidence in their municipal governments. But is this confidence warranted? Using big data and a representative sample of American communities, this book provides the first systematic examination of racial and class inequalities in local politics. We find that non-whites and less-affluent residents are consistent losers in local democracy. Residents of color and those with lower incomes receive less representation from local elected officials than do whites and the affluent. Additionally, they are much less likely than privileged community members to have their preferences reflected in local government policy. Contrary to the popular assumption that governments that are “closest” govern best, we find that inequalities in representation are most severe in suburbs and small towns. Typical reforms do not seem to improve the situation, and we recommend new approaches.


The Apartisan American Dealignment And Changing Electoral Politics

Author by : Russell J. Dalton
Languange : en
Publisher by : CQ Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 53
Total Download : 753
File Size : 49,7 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Party identification is often considered the most important concept in modern electoral research--yet Americans' party ties have eroded. Today, independents comprise the largest portion of voters, outnumbering either Democrats or Republicans. This provocative book sheds new light on the dealignment trend with the emergence of an independent voter Dalton is calling the Apartisan American. Utilizing 60 years of electoral surveys, Dalton's friendly and concise narrative shows students just who these apartisans are and how they're introducing new volatility into electoral politics, changing the calculus of electoral decision making, and altering the behavior of political parties. Dalton also shows the same dealignment trend happening in other established democracies. Understanding these apartisans is key to understanding the 2012 election as well as party and electoral politics into the future.


Voter Participation And Election Timing In Public Measure And Local Option Tax Elections

Author by : Clinton Michael Fichter
Languange : en
Publisher by : Unknown
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 32
Total Download : 961
File Size : 51,5 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : Using several different techniques, both descriptive and inferential, this study examines the effect of election timing on voter turnout in these elections. Local public measure and local option tax elections rarely attract high levels of voter participation from the citizens of Iowa. Public measure and local option tax elections decide many local policy issues and are the most common form of direct democracy in Iowa. When public measure and local option tax elections are held concurrently with presidential, and to a lesser degree mid-term elections, voter turnout tends to be significantly higher than holding them as separate special elections. Another finding of this study is that public measure elections to build or refurbish a school tend to attract a much higher level of participation than other types of public measure elections. This study presents a limited analysis of the potential social characteristics driving voter turnout.


Encyclopedia Of U S Campaigns Elections And Electoral Behavior

Author by : Kenneth F. Warren
Languange : en
Publisher by : SAGE Publications
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 62
Total Download : 771
File Size : 47,6 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : "Overall, a first-rate resource, and yes, pleasantly readable." —School Library Journal The Encyclopedia of U.S. Campaigns, Elections, and Electoral Behavior covers virtually everything one would want to know about American political campaigns. With more than 450 entries, these two comprehensive volumes present a significant array topics of campaigns, elections, and electoral behavior. The encyclopedia's diverse content shows that although the subject matter of campaigns, elections, and electoral behavior is inherently related, each topic has a distinct focus. Key Features Presents topics in a straightforward, easy-to-understand manner, intentionally avoiding unnecessary technical language Includes entries written by electoral behavior scholars from around the country Focuses on American campaigns, elections, and electoral behavior but also provides a culturally and politically diverse perspective of American democratic practices and institutions Offers a rich campaign history by looking at many colorful candidates, corrupt yet intriguing political machines, rapidly changing technologies, campaign organizations, and strategies Provides a description and scholarly analysis for all presidential elections, including state and general elections Presents and simplifies complicated election laws that govern federal, state, and local elections Examines various efforts throughout the decades to reform elections, especially from social upheaval and the resulting political realignments Includes extensive electoral research into the development of political opinions, attitudes, and ideologies in American voters Key Themes Ballot Issue Campaigns Campaigns, Elections and the Law Corruption in American Campaigns and Elections Electoral Behavior of Various Groups Local Campaigns and Elections Media's Role in American Campaigns and Elections People Political Parties, Interest Groups, and American Campaigns and Elections Political Theory and Democratic Elections in America Polls, Public Opinion, and Campaigns and Elections Presidential Campaigns and Elections Reforming American Campaigns and Elections Running Political Campaigns: Management, Organization, and Strategies Social and Psychological Dynamics of Electoral Behavior State and Congressional Campaigns and Elections: History and State Profiles The Encyclopedia of U.S. Campaigns, Elections, and Electoral Behavior is an especially useful reference, published to coincide with the 2008 presidential election. This informative yet intriguing resource is a welcome addition to any academic or public library.


The Political Mobilization Of The European Left 1860 1980

Author by : Stefano Bartolini
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 35
Total Download : 880
File Size : 47,8 Mb
GET BOOK

Description : In an in-depth comparative analysis, Stefano Bartolini studies the history of socialism and working-class politics in Western Europe. While examining the social contexts, organizational structures, and political developments of thirteen socialist experiences from the 1860s to the 1980s, he reconstructs the steps through which social conflict was translated and structured into an opposition, as well as how it developed its different organizational and ideological forms, and how it managed more or less successfully to mobilize its reference groups politically.