Utopia In The Anthropocene

Author by : Michael Harvey
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 57
Total Download : 669
File Size : 55,7 Mb
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Description : Utopia in the Anthropocene takes a cross-disciplinary approach to analyse our current world problems, identify the key resistance to change and take the reader step by step towards a more sustainable, equitable and rewarding world. It presents paradigm-shifting models of economics, political decision-making, business organization and leadership and community life. These are supported by psychological evidence, utopian literature and inspirational changes in history. The Anthropocene is in crisis, because human activity is changing almost everything about life on this planet at an unparalleled pace. Climate change, the environmental emergency, economic inequality, threats to democracy and peace and an onslaught of new technology: these planetwide risks can seem too big to comprehend, let alone manage. Our reckless pursuit of infinite economic growth on a finite planet could even take us towards a global dystopia. As an unprecedented frenzy of change grips the world, the case for utopia is stronger than ever. An effective change plan requires a bold, imaginative vision, practical goals and clarity around the psychological values necessary to bring about a transformation. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of the environmental humanities, sustainability studies, ecological economics, organizational psychology, politics, utopian philosophy and literature – and all who long for a better world.


Gardens And Human Agency In The Anthropocene

Author by : Maria Paula Diogo
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 60
Total Download : 558
File Size : 40,7 Mb
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Description : This volume discusses gardens as designed landscapes of mediation between nature and culture, embodying different levels of human control over wilderness, defining specific rules for this confrontation and staging different forms of human dominance. The contributing authors focus on ways of rethinking the garden and its role in contemporary society, using it as a crossover platform between nature, science and technology. Drawing upon their diverse fields of research, including History of Science and Technology, Environmental Studies, Gardens and Landscape Studies, Urban Studies, and Visual and Artistic Studies, the authors unveil various entanglements woven in the past between nature and culture, and probe the potential of alternative epistemologies to escape the predicament of fatalistic dystopias that often revolve around the Anthropocene debate. This book will be of great interest to those studying environmental and landscape history, the history of science and technology, historical geography, and the environmental humanities.


The Routledge Companion To The Environmental Humanities

Author by : Ursula K. Heise
Languange : en
Publisher by : Taylor & Francis
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 94
Total Download : 445
File Size : 44,6 Mb
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Description : The Routledge Companion to the Environmental Humanities provides a comprehensive, transnational, and interdisciplinary map to the field, offering a broad overview of its founding principles while providing insight into exciting new directions for future scholarship. Articulating the significance of humanistic perspectives for our collective social engagement with ecological crises, the volume explores the potential of the environmental humanities for organizing humanistic research, opening up new forms of interdisciplinarity, and shaping public debate and policies on environmental issues. Sections cover: The Anthropocene and the Domestication of Earth Posthumanism and Multispecies Communities Inequality and Environmental Justice Decline and Resilience: Environmental Narratives, History, and Memory Environmental Arts, Media, and Technologies The State of the Environmental Humanities The first of its kind, this companion covers essential issues and themes, necessarily crossing disciplines within the humanities and with the social and natural sciences. Exploring how the environmental humanities contribute to policy and action concerning some of the key intellectual, social, and environmental challenges of our times, the chapters offer an ideal guide to this rapidly developing field.


Anglophone Literature And Culture In The Anthropocene

Author by : Gina Comos
Languange : en
Publisher by : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 93
Total Download : 796
File Size : 45,7 Mb
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Description : Defined as an ecological epoch in which humans have the most impact on the environment, the Anthropocene poses challenging questions to literary and cultural studies. If, in the Anthropocene, the distinction between nature and culture increasingly collapses, we have to rethink our division between historiography and natural history, as well as notions of the subject and of agency since the Enlightenment. This anthology collects papers from literary and cultural studies that address various issues surrounding the topic. Even though the new epoch seems to require a collective self-understanding as a unified species, readings of the Anthropocene and conceptualizations of human-nature relationships largely differ in Anglophone literatures and cultures. These differing perspectives are reflected in the structure of this book, which is divided into five separate sections: the introductory part familiarizes the reader with the concept and the challenges it poses for the humanities in general and for literary and cultural studies in particular, and the three following sections combine broader, more theoretical, essays with in-depth critical readings of US, Canadian, and Australian representations of the Anthropocene in literature. The final part moves beyond literature to include media theoretical perspectives and discussions of photography and cinema in the Anthropocene.


The Human Planet

Author by : Simon L. Lewis
Languange : en
Publisher by : Penguin UK
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 67
Total Download : 228
File Size : 51,5 Mb
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Description : Meteorites, methane, mega-volcanoes and now human beings; the old forces of nature that transformed Earth many millions of years ago are joined by another: us. Our actions have driven Earth into a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. For the first time in our home planet's 4.5-billion year history a single species is dictating Earth's future. To some the Anthropocene symbolises a future of superlative control of our environment. To others it is the height of hubris, the illusion of our mastery over nature. Whatever your view, just below the surface of this odd-sounding scientific word, the Anthropocene, is a heady mix of science, philosophy, religion and politics linked to our deepest fears and utopian visions. Tracing our environmental impact through time to reveal when humans began to dominate Earth, Simon Lewis and Mark Maslin show what the new epoch means for the future of humanity, the planet and life itself.


Epilogue To On My Ancestors Planet

Author by : Ethan Leners
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 13
Total Download : 651
File Size : 55,5 Mb
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Description : On My Ancestors' Planet is a story that turns to the past to craft a queer, speculative future. The fundamental concern is finding the means to navigate queer utopia from the wreckage of the Anthropocene. What do we do with what we've inherited from our ancestors? What role does race and sex play in this? How does non-linear storytelling position us in spacetime? This is the epilogue to On My Ancestors' Planet. It is the account of a conversation held within this fictional world by a group of fictional scholars.


Greening Citizenship

Author by : A. Scerri
Languange : en
Publisher by : Springer
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 18
Total Download : 528
File Size : 45,5 Mb
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Description : The greening of citizenship, the state and ideology has created both opportunities and bottlenecks for progressive political movements. Scerri argues that these are pursuing justice by making holistic demands for: fair distribution and status recognition, adequate representation and effective participation.


Know Your World A Geographer S Guide To The Anthropocene Age

Author by : John J. Moran
Languange : en
Publisher by : Lulu.com
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
Total Download : 307
File Size : 52,5 Mb
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Description : Darwin named Geography as 'Queen of the sciences'. His observations of geographical connections had revealed the phenomenon of Life in a remarkably structured Earth-world as inter-locked dynamic systems. This 'Systems View of Life' is reviving at a time when we are facing a crisis of collapse in world systems, and the prospect of a breaking world, as a result of reckless human activities driven by amoral values. We are all geographers, embarked on a voyage in search of the optimum location with the promise of support and betterment of our future living conditions. But, for most of the world's people, this is an experience of Life fraught with hardship and deprivation. Compelled to take stock of our deteriorating environment, as well as to question the values we hold, the message is that we have the collective restorative power of geographical knowledge which can be applied to achieve a better world.


Anthropocene Fictions

Author by : Adam Trexler
Languange : en
Publisher by : University of Virginia Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 80
Total Download : 905
File Size : 42,7 Mb
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Description : Since the Industrial Revolution, humans have transformed the Earth’s atmosphere, committing our planet to more extreme weather, rising sea levels, melting polar ice caps, and mass extinction. This period of observable human impact on the Earth’s ecosystems has been called the Anthropocene Age. The anthropogenic climate change that has impacted the Earth has also affected our literature, but criticism of the contemporary novel has not adequately recognized the literary response to this level of environmental crisis. Ecocriticism’s theories of place and planet, meanwhile, are troubled by a climate that is neither natural nor under human control. Anthropocene Fictions is the first systematic examination of the hundreds of novels that have been written about anthropogenic climate change. Drawing on climatology, the sociology and philosophy of science, geography, and environmental economics, Adam Trexler argues that the novel has become an essential tool to construct meaning in an age of climate change. The novel expands the reach of climate science beyond the laboratory or model, turning abstract predictions into subjectively tangible experiences of place, identity, and culture. Political and economic organizations are also being transformed by their struggle for sustainability. In turn, the novel has been forced to adapt to new boundaries between truth and fabrication, nature and economies, and individual choice and larger systems of natural phenomena. Anthropocene Fictions argues that new modes of inhabiting climate are of the utmost critical and political importance, when unprecedented scientific consensus has failed to lead to action. Under the Sign of Nature: Explorations in Ecocriticism


Molecular Red

Author by : Mckenzie Wark
Languange : en
Publisher by : Verso Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 57
Total Download : 155
File Size : 53,7 Mb
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Description : In Molecular Red, McKenzie Wark creates philosophical tools for the Anthropocene, our new planetary epoch, in which human and natural forces are so entwined that the future of one determines that of the other. Wark explores the implications of Anthropocene through the story of two empires, the Soviet and then the American. The fall of the former prefigures that of the latter. From the ruins of these mighty histories, Wark salvages ideas to help us picture what kind of worlds collective labor might yet build. From the Russian revolution, Wark unearths the work of Alexander Bogdanov—Lenin’s rival—as well as the great Proletkult writer and engineer Andrey Platonov. The Soviet experiment emerges from the past as an allegory for the new organizational challenges of our time. From deep within the Californian military-entertainment complex, Wark retrieves Donna Haraway’s cyborg critique and science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson’s Martian utopia as powerful resources for rethinking and remaking the world that climate change has wrought. Molecular Red proposes an alternative realism, where hope is found in what remains and endures.