Wilderness And Political Ecology

Author by : Charles Kay
Languange : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 77
Total Download : 143
File Size : 44,6 Mb
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Description : Environmental law and philosophy assume the existence of a fundamental state of nature: Before the arrival of Columbus, the Americas were a wilderness untouched by human hand, teeming with wildlife and almost void of native peoples. In Wilderness and Political Ecology Charles Kay and Randy Simmons state that this "natural" view of pre-European America is scientifically unsupportable. This volume brings together scholars from a variety of fields as they seek to demonstrate that native people were originally more numerous than once thought and that they were not conservationists in the current sense of the term. Rather, native peoples took an active part in managing their surroundings and wrought changes so extensive that the anthropogenic environment has long been viewed as the natural state of the American ecosystem.


Deep Power

Author by : David Kowalewski
Languange : en
Publisher by : Nova Science Pub Incorporated
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 35
Total Download : 757
File Size : 41,9 Mb
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Description : Civilization is trashing the earth faster than the earth can heal herself. The list of atrocities is endless: global warming, ozone depletion, deforestation, declining sperm-counts, desertification, topsoil erosion, fisheries depletion, hazardous waste dumping, outer space pollution, acid rain, overpopulation and so on. We are now on the brink of the earth's sixth mass extinction -- the only one caused by humans. The human species, as presently organized, has become maladaptive to the global environment. The author concludes that the answer to this problem is that we don't need to save civilization for humans, we need to save humans from civilization. Humans need to return to natural law, obeying the dictates of evolution. Only then can the earth heal herself. By separating us from the wild, civilization has cut us off from the energy of the universe. Since energy is power, separating humans from nature makes them powerless. Civilization's destruction of nature, therefore, is fundamentally a question of power. We need "deep power", namely the balancing of physical and material power with its underlying metaphysical or spiritual power. Without deep power, purely physical or shallow power becomes distorted and self-destructive. This book is about balancing -- balancing physical power with metaphysical power. Civilization has made humans unbalanced; when they start walking in balance, they will become deeply powerful and the earth will be able to heal herself. It is time that social scientists incorporate the metaphysical into their analyses; it can only make the social sciences more powerful and, above all, useful. In this book the author cites a wide array of research supporting thenotion of the metaphysical -- studies that have employed conventional scientific methods but have been all too conveniently -- and justifiably -- ignored.


Political Ecology And Tourism

Author by : Sanjay Nepal
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 31
Total Download : 684
File Size : 43,9 Mb
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Description : Political ecology explicitly addresses the relations between the social and the natural, arguing that social and environmental conditions are deeply and inextricably linked. Its emphasis on the material state of nature as the outcome of political processes, as well as the construction and understanding of nature itself as political is greatly relevant to tourism. Very few tourism scholars have used political ecology as a lens to examine tourism-centric natural resource management issues. This book brings together experts in the field, with a foreword from Piers Blaikie, to provide a global exploration of the application of political ecology to tourism. It addresses the underlying issues of power, ownership, and policies that determine the ways in which tourism development decisions are made and implemented. Furthermore, contributions document the complex array of relationships between tourism stakeholders, including indigenous communities, and multiple scales of potential conflicts and compromises. This groundbreaking book covers 15 contributions organized around four cross-cutting themes of communities and livelihoods; class, representation, and power; dispossession and displacement; and, environmental justice and community empowerment. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars in tourism, geography, anthropology, sociology, environmental studies, and natural resources management.


Critical Political Ecology

Author by : Timothy Forsyth
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 33
Total Download : 153
File Size : 41,6 Mb
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Description : Critical Political Ecology brings political debate to the science of ecology. As political controversies multiply over the science underlying environmental debates, there is an increasing need to understand the relationship between environmental science and politics. In this timely and wide-ranging volume, Tim Forsyth uses an innovative approach to apply political analysis to ecology, and demonstrates how more politicised approaches to science can be used in environmental decision-making. Critical Political Ecology examines: *how social and political factors frame environmental science, and how science in turn shapes politics *how new thinking in philosophy and sociology of science can provide fresh insights into the biophysical causes and impacts of environmental problems *how policy and decision-makers can acknowledge the political influences on science and achieve more effective public participation and governance.


Making Political Ecology

Author by : Rod Neumann
Languange : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 70
Total Download : 467
File Size : 51,6 Mb
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Description : Making Political Ecology presents a comprehensive view of an important new field in human geography and interdisciplinary studies of nature-society relations. Tracing the development of political ecology from its origins in geography and ecological anthropology in the 1970s, to its current status as an established field, the book investigates how late twentieth-century developments in social and ecological theories are brought together to create a powerful framework for comprehending environmental problems. Making Political Ecology argues for an inclusionary conceptualization of the field, which absorbs empirical studies from urban, rural, First World and Third World contexts and the theoretical insights of feminism, poststructuralism, neo-Marxism and non-equilibrium ecology. Throughout the book, excerpts from the writings of key figures in political ecology provide an empirical grounding for abstract theoretical concepts. Making Political Ecology will convince readers of political ecology's particular suitability for grappling with the most difficult questions concerning social justice, environmental change and human relationships with nature.


Political Ecology

Author by : Paul Robbins
Languange : en
Publisher by : John Wiley & Sons
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 31
Total Download : 615
File Size : 41,6 Mb
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Description : This fully updated new edition introduces the core concepts, central thinkers, and major works of the burgeoning field of political ecology. Explores the key arguments and contemporary explanatory challenges facing the sub-discipline Provides the first full history of the development of political ecology over the last century and its theoretical underpinnings Considers the major challenges facing the field now and for the future Study boxes introduce key figures in the development of the discipline and summarize their most important works Fully updated to include recent events, such as the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill, as well as both urban and rural examples, from the developed and underdeveloped world


Political Ecology

Author by : Karl S. Zimmerer
Languange : en
Publisher by : Guilford Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 55
Total Download : 626
File Size : 48,7 Mb
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Description : This volume offers a unique, integrative perspective on the political and ecological processes shaping landscapes and resource use across the global North and South. Twelve carefully selected case studies demonstrate how contemporary geographical theories and methods can contribute to understanding key environment-and-development issues and working toward effective policies. Topics addressed include water and biodiversity resources, urban and national resource planning, scientific concepts of resource management, and ideas of nature and conservation in the context of globalization. Giving particular attention to evolving conceptions of nature-society interaction and geographical scale, an introduction and conclusion by the editors provide a clear analytical focus for the volume and summarize important developments and debates in the field.


Aquanomics

Author by : B. Delworth Gardner
Languange : en
Publisher by : Transaction Publishers
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 16
Total Download : 471
File Size : 43,9 Mb
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Description : Water is becoming increasingly scarce. If recent usage trends continue, shortages are inevitable. Aquanomics discusses some of the instruments and policies that may be implemented to postpone, or even avoid, the onset of “water crises.” These policies include establishing secure andtransferable private water rights and extending these rights to uses that traditionally have not been allowed, includingaltering in-stream flows and ecosystem functions. The editors argue that such policies will help maximize water quantity and quality as water becomes scarcer and more valuable. Aquanomics contains many examples of how this is being accomplished, particularly in the formation of water markets and market-like exchanges of water rights. Many observers see calamity ahead unless water supplies are harnessed and effectively conserved, and unless water quality can be improved. It is also clear that declining water quality is a serious problem in much of the world, as increasing human activities induce high levels of water degradation. Those who voice these concerns, argue the contributors to this volume, fail to consider the forces for improvement inherent in market political-economic systems that can address water issues. The contributors see water quality in economically advanced countries as improving, and they believe this establishes the validity of market-based approaches.


Applied Urban Ecology

Author by : Matthias Richter
Languange : en
Publisher by : John Wiley & Sons
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 39
Total Download : 302
File Size : 42,5 Mb
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Description : Applied Urban Ecology: A Global Framework explores ways in which the environmental quality of urban areas can be improved starting with existing environmental conditions and their dynamics. Written by an internationally renowned selection of scientists and practitioners, the book covers a broad range of established and novel approaches to applied urban ecology. Approaches chosen for the book are placed in the context of issues such as climate change, green- and open-space development, flood-risk assessment, threats to urban biodiversity, and increasing environmental pollution (especially in the “megacities” of newly industrialized countries). All topics covered were chosen because they are socially and socio-politically relevant today. Further topics covered include sustainable energy and budget management, urban water resource management, urban land management, and urban landscape planning and design. Throughout the book, concepts and methods are illustrated using case studies from around the world. A closing synopsis draws conclusions on how the findings of urban ecological research can be used in strategic urban management in the future. Applied Urban Ecology: A Global Framework is an advanced textbook for students, researchers and experienced practitioners in urban ecology and urban environmental research, planning, and practice.


Making Meaning Out Of Mountains

Author by : Mark C.J. Stoddart
Languange : en
Publisher by : UBC Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 92
Total Download : 283
File Size : 49,7 Mb
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Description : Mountains bear the imprint of human activity. Scars from logging and surface mining sit alongside national parks and ski lodges. Although the environmental effects of extractive industries are well known, skiing is more likely to bring to mind images of luxury, wealth, and health. Drawing on interviews, field observations, and media analysis, Stoddart reveals the multiple, often conflicting meanings attached to skiing by skiers, mass media, First Nations, industry leaders, and environmentalists in British Columbia. Stoddart challenges us to reflect on skiing's negative effects as he exposes how certain groups came to be viewed as the "natural" inhabitants and legitimate managers of mountain environments.